Power Consumption

Intel isn't really exploiting 22nm for significantly higher default or max turbo frequencies. While it does seem like you'll hit turbo frequencies more often with Ivy, most of what 22nm offers will be realized as power savings.

The data in the charts below is from our original 3770K preview, however I've also provided a table comparing the 3770K to the 2700K using Intel's own Z77 motherboard which is a bit more power hungry than our typical testbed:

Power Consumption Comparison
Intel DZ77GA-70K Idle Load (x264 2nd pass)
Intel Core i7 3770K 80.1W 146.4W
Intel Core i7 2700K 79.4W 177.6W

As you can see, there are no savings at idle and a reasonably significant improvement under load.

The same is echoed on our earlier chip in a more power efficient platform:

Power Consumption—Idle

Power Consumption—Load (x264 HD 3.03 2nd Pass)

I was also curious to see what power consumption would look like compared to other low-end GPUs. For these next results I used the 3770K alone, without a discrete card and measured power consumption. I then added in discrete GPUs from our HD 4000 comparisons and looked at both idle and load power while playing Metro 2033:

GPU Power Consumption—Idle

Obviously at idle it's impossible to beat the HD 4000, the GPU is largely stopped/gated when idle keeping power consumption to a minimum. Under load is where things get interesting:

GPU Power Consumption—Load (Metro 2033)

Ivy's GPU is much more power efficient than SNB's, however Intel still has a way to go before it starts to equal the power efficiency of modern discrete GPU architectures. Remember the HD 4000 is on Intel's 22nm process here while the GT 440 is built on TSMC's 40nm process.

Intel HD 4000 Performance: Compute & Synthetics Quick Sync Image Quality & Performance
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  • Tujan - Tuesday, April 24, 2012 - link

    cause how I see it :
    " If you're constantly transcoding movies to get them onto your smartphone or tablet, you need Ivy Bridge. In less than 7 minutes, and with no impact to CPU usage, I was able to transcode a complete 130 minute 1080p video to an iPad friendly format—that's over 15x real time."

    The majority of trancoding is going the other way- from an ipad friendly format to another friendly type format (device or not). Cell phone to pc,ipad to youtube etc.
    I like the concept of the transcode,encode,but as much as with the bandwidth necesary to utilize them they are as they are 'bandwidth hungry'. And here is the first I have noticed that of telling there is hardware to facilitate the h.264 type encoding. "Hardware" to do this.
    The screens from all of those cell phones in high resolution 'still'require bandwidth to utilize them. .. and so on.

    I dont understand it completely but I'll attempt to stay tuned.
    Reply
  • androticus - Tuesday, April 24, 2012 - link

    I find this review enormously confusing. You mix IB and SB parts/sku's throughout, without clearly highlighting which is which. On page 2, at first I thought the chart was of IB CPUs, but then realized it was a mishmash of both. Likewise on all the benchmark charts, and I couldn't even distinguish various SB/IB/core counts apart.

    Was this article written solely for people who have a PhD in Intel sku's ???
    Reply
  • Dudenell - Tuesday, April 24, 2012 - link

    Could we actually see comparison with the i7-920 or i7-950 in there? Reply
  • Pjotr - Wednesday, April 25, 2012 - link

    Thanks for the Compile test, this is all I look at to decide purchases at work. Reply
  • sld - Wednesday, April 25, 2012 - link

    The A8 is conspicuously missing from the 2 charts showing idle and load system consumption. Why is this so? Reply
  • greggm2000 - Wednesday, April 25, 2012 - link

    Anand/Ryan,

    According to the article linked below from today, it seems that Intel may be using TIM paste instead of fluxless solder in the IB chips, and if so, does this seem like a reasonable explanation for the high temperatures that people are seeing?

    I'm interested in your thoughts on this... and if it's true, and if the article is correct, then Intel deliberately handicapping their chips (to possibly preserve SB-E sales?) is quite troubling to me.

    http://www.overclockers.com/ivy-bridge-temperature...
    Reply
  • slickr - Thursday, April 26, 2012 - link

    Hi, is this good enough of an upgrade over a Pentium 4 for office, internet and movies?

    And will the HD4000 beat a ATI x1650XT?
    Reply
  • Death666Angel - Friday, April 27, 2012 - link

    Hey guys!
    Good review overall, thanks for that!
    But the Quicksync section was kinda strange. No way that an x86 software solution generates worse IQ than any accelerated stuff. Unless you were comparing IQ with settings that have the x86 do recode the file in the same time it takes the other solutions. Anyway, I don't understand what you did in that section. :-)
    Reply
  • kevith - Friday, April 27, 2012 - link

    Great review.

    Would it be interesting to see how it fared in a series 6 motherboard, now that it actually is backwards compatible?
    Reply
  • pwnsweet - Saturday, April 28, 2012 - link

    The only thing I care about is how much faster this new slab of silicon will power though my x264 encoding and that's the one part of the review that was left out!

    Why anand, why!?
    Reply

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