The Next iPhone

Historically the iPad has been the launch vehicle for Apple's next-generation iPhone SoC. It's safe to say that the 45nm A5X we've seen here today won't be finding its way into a smartphone. Instead what we're likely to see in the next iPhone this year is a 28/32nm shrink of the A5, coupled with Qualcomm's 28nm MDM9615 instead of the 45nm MDM9600 enabling LTE support.

It'll be next year before we see the introduction of the A6 in the fourth generation iPad, which will likely bring ARM's Cortex A15 to the table as well as Imagination Technologies' PowerVR Series 6 (codename Rogue) GPU. Apple isn't done driving GPU performance. There's still a chance we'd see the introduction of a Cortex A15 based SoC late this year for the new iPhone but I still believe the timing is too aggressive for that to happen.

Haswell

In working on this review, Vivek IMed me and told me the best part of using an iPad instead of a notebook is the battery life. When the battery indicator reads only 20% left, chances are you've still got a good couple of hours of battery life left on the new iPad. On a MacBook Pro? You're lucky if you get half of that.

The question is, must this gap always exist? The MacBook Pro has much more power hungry silicon, and it's running a much more power hungry OS and application set. I won't go too far into this but one of the promises Intel is making with Haswell, its 2013 microprocessor architecture, is for a > 20x decrease in connected standby power. Intel's goal is to be able to deliver an Ultrabook in 2013 that can remain in connected standby (still receiving emails, Twitter updates, push notfications, etc...) for up to 10 days on a single charge.

What about for a lighter, more tablet like usage model? Will Haswell be able to deliver more iPad-like battery life for most tasks, but offer the horsepower and flexibility to run a traditional OS? I'm hearing very exciting things about next year...

Windows 8

A while ago I made a list of the top 10 things I did with my computer. It looked something like this:

Web Browsing
IM
Photo/Video Editing
Excel
Editing Reviews (HTML)
Publishing Reviews (FTP, CMS access)
3D Gaming
Writing
Email
Twitter

Of that list of 10, most of them could be done on a tablet, but only a couple of them delivered a better experience on a tablet than on a desktop/notebook (web browsing and email). You could argue that interacting with Twitter is also better on a tablet as well. Regardless of where you draw the line however, the fact of the matter is that for a user like me I can't replace a notebook with a tablet or vice versa. I need both. I don't like the idea of needing both, I'd rather just have one that could always deliver the best experience possible.

It's this problem I believe Microsoft is trying to address with Windows 8. Put Windows 8 on a convertible or dockable tablet (ala ASUS' Transformer Prime), with x86 hardware, and you've got a very real solution to this problem. When you want a touchscreen tablet, you've got one. When you want a more traditional workhorse notebook, you've got one there as well. I make the x86 reference because that way you don't lose out on compatibility with all of your older desktop apps that you may rely on.

For years Microsoft has failed to deliver a consumer friendly tablet by forcing a desktop UI on it. Its experience with Media Center taught us all that vastly different usage models need different user interfaces. It took Microsoft a long time to realize this, but with Windows 8 I believe it has one solution to the tablet problem. It is ironic/funny/depressing that with Windows 8 Microsoft is simply making the same mistake it made for years with tablets, in reverse. This time around the desktop experience suffers (or at best, just isn't moved forward) in order to focus more on the tablet experience. Sigh, one of these days they'll figure it out.

The point of this sidebar on Windows 8 is to talk about the iOS equivalent. Apple advocated so strongly with the iPhone for the consolidation of devices, I can't help but assume that we'll see a similar move in the MacBook Air/iPad space. iOS is far more multitasking friendly today than it was a couple of years ago. The support for multitasking gestures alone on the iPad is huge. But there clearly has to be more. I don't even know if iOS 6 is really when we'll see this intersection between tablet and ultra portable happen. Like Haswell, this may also be a 2013 thing...

WiFi, GPS & AirPlay Vivek's Impressions
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  • kwamayze - Friday, March 30, 2012 - link

    WOW!!! What a nice review!!! Well done Reply
  • michalkaznowski - Saturday, March 31, 2012 - link

    Just to say as always a brilliant view. Your site is a must view for any enthusiast here in the UK. I also have appreciated your wireless router reviews of the Airport Extreme Base Station. Only you have pointed out that it has a quantum leap stability when compared to other makes of routers, something that a group of us have had to find out a very hard, frustrating and long way!

    Michal
    Reply
  • x0rg - Saturday, March 31, 2012 - link

    I have a suggestion. Instead of taking pictures you could take screenshots of these devices when you show how beautiful the screen is while working with Remote Desktop. Pictures taken with the camera look terrible and the whole concept of taking pictures instead of screenshots seems unprofessional for the portal like AnandTech. Things like focus, gamma, apperture are not affecting the picture quality when you just take a screenshot (Home+Power on iPad, you know that). Please replace these terrible pictures with screenshots. Thank you. Reply
  • slashbinslashbash - Sunday, April 01, 2012 - link

    You missed the whole point of that part of the review. The point of the photos was to show that the text over Remote Desktop is actually readable in real-world use. A screenshot wouldn't convey that information.

    Imagine this. Say you took an iPhone 4 screenshot of the same scene in Remote Desktop, and you posted it on the site. This would be a 640x960 pixel image. Text would be readable on a desktop monitor, but it would probably not be readable on the actual 3.5" iPhone screen. That is the question, and it applies equally to the iPad3 review. A screenshot just shows you what pixels the iPad is showing; a photo shows you how those pixels look in real-life.
    Reply
  • x0rg - Thursday, April 05, 2012 - link

    I agree, my bad. Reply
  • TekFanChris - Sunday, April 01, 2012 - link

    Thank you Anand and Vivek! You guys always take the iPad reviews to the next level. Comprehensive and complete.

    Cheers.
    Reply
  • Death666Angel - Monday, April 02, 2012 - link

    That kinda reminded me of the PS2 vs PC quality back in the days. :D Reply
  • josemonmaliakal - Monday, April 02, 2012 - link

    Hi Your article seems be so good . And i have got something about the upcoming iPhone 5 of Apple here @ http://wp.me/p2gN9B-lq Reply
  • Wardawg - Thursday, April 05, 2012 - link

    You forget the new iPad just came out 95% of the apps have not upgraded for the new retina display yet. So all of these comparisons are very inaccurate. It doesn't matter that the iPad has higher res and 3.1 million pixels if the app isn't upgraded for retina display it won't display as such you would expect. I expect you guys to make a new article soon fixing these concerns of mine with this article. Reply
  • Noobuser45 - Monday, April 09, 2012 - link

    Anand, you're the only tech expert that I trust so I would love to have my mind put at ease with a definitive answer from you. Is it fine to charge the iPad whenever you want? Can I charge without running it down first? Can I charge for a while and unplug it before it has reached a full charge? Can I use it while it's charging? I just don't want to screw up the battery life. Reply

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