The Lineup

Intel will initially launch quad-core SKUs on the desktop. Ivy Bridge will be branded as Intel's 3rd generation Core microarchitecture and use model numbers below 3800. The 3800 - 3900 series are reserved for Sandy Bridge E for the time being, while the 2000 series refers to last year's Sandy Bridge parts. Just like we saw with Sandy Bridge, Ivy will be available in fully unlocked (K-series), partially unlocked (any part with Turbo support) and fully locked (anything without Turbo support) SKUs.

What we know about the lineup today is summarized in the table below:

Processor Core Clock Cores / Threads L3 Cache Max Turbo Intel HD Graphics TDP Price
Intel Core i7 3960X 3.3GHz 6 / 12 15MB 3.9GHz N/A 130W $990
Intel Core i7 3930K 3.2GHz 6 / 12 12MB 3.8GHz N/A 130W $555
Intel Core i7 3820 3.6GHz 4 / 8 10MB 3.9GHz N/A 130W $285
Intel Core i7 3770K 3.5GHz 4 / 8 8MB 3.9GHz 4000 77W $332 est
Intel Core i7 3770 3.4GHz 4 / 8 8MB 3.9GHz 4000 77W $294 est
Intel Core i5 3570K 3.4GHz 4 / 4 6MB 3.8GHz 4000 77W TBD
Intel Core i5 3570 3.4GHz 4 / 4 6MB 3.8GHz 2500 77W TBD
Intel Core i5 3550 3.3GHz 4 / 4 6MB 3.7GHz 2500 77W TBD
Intel Core i5 3470 3.2GHz 4 / 4 6MB 3.6GHz 2500 77W TBD
Intel Core i5 3450 3.1GHz 4 / 4 6MB 3.5GHz 2500 77W TBD
Intel Core i5 3330 3.0GHz 4 / 4 6MB 3.2GHz 2500 77W TBD
Intel Core i7 2700K 3.5GHz 4 / 8 8MB 3.9GHz 3000 95W $332
Intel Core i7 2600K 3.4GHz 4 / 8 8MB 3.8GHz 3000 95W $317
Intel Core i7 2600 3.4GHz 4 / 8 8MB 3.8GHz 2000 95W $294
Intel Core i5 2500K 3.3GHz 4 / 4 6MB 3.7GHz 3000 95W $216
Intel Core i5 2500 3.3GHz 4 / 4 6MB 3.7GHz 2000 95W $205

Unlike the initial Sandy Bridge launch, both fully and partially unlocked Ivy Bridge parts will ship with Intel HD 4000 graphics - although that's still reserved for the high-end on the desktop. I am also seeing movement towards removing core-count restrictions on turbo frequencies. Today max turbo is defined in most cases by the highest frequency you can reach with only one core active. I would not be surprised to see Intel eventually move to a setup where max turbo can be reached regardless of number of active cores and just base it on current power consumption and thermal conditions.

Chipset Support

Ivy Bridge uses the same LGA-1155 socket as Sandy Bridge. Provided there's BIOS/UEFI support from your board maker, you can use Ivy Bridge CPUs in older 6-series motherboards. Doing so won't give you access to some of the newer 7-series chipset features like PCIe Gen 3 (some 6-series boards are claiming 3.0 support), native USB 3.0 (many 6-series boards have 3rd party USB 3.0 controllers) and Intel's Rapid Start Technology.

Chipset Comparison
  Z77 Z75 H77 Z68 P67 H67
CPU Support IVB
LGA-1155
IVB
LGA-1155
IVB
LGA-1155
SNB/IVB
LGA-1155
SNB/IVB
LGA-1155
SNB/IVB
LGA-1155
CPU Overclocking Yes Yes No Yes Yes No
CPU PCIe Config 1 x16 or
2 x8 or
1 x8 + 2 x4
PCIe 3.0
1 x16 or
2 x8 PCIe 3.0
1 x16 PCIe 3.0 1 x16 or
2 x8 or
1 x8 + 2 x4
PCIe 3.0
1 x16 or
2 x8 PCIe 3.0
1 x16 PCIe 3.0
Processor Graphics Support Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes
Intel SRT (SSD caching) Yes No Yes Yes No No
RAID Support Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
USB 2.0 Ports (3.0) 14 (4) 14 (4) 14 (4) 14 14 14
SATA Total (Max Number of 6Gbps Ports) 6 (2) 6 (2) 6 (2) 6 (2) 6 (2) 6 (2)
PCIe Lanes 8 (5GT/s) 8 (5GT/s) 8 (5GT/s) 8 (5GT/s) 8 (5GT/s) 8 (5GT/s)

The big change this year is that all 7-series chipsets support processor graphics, while last year Intel had the silly P vs. H split until Z68 arrived and simplified everything.

Ivy Bridge Architecture Recap The State of Ivy Bridge Silicon
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  • tipoo - Wednesday, March 07, 2012 - link

    Thankfully the comments of a certain troll were removed so mine no longer makes sense, for any future readers. Reply
  • Articuno - Tuesday, March 06, 2012 - link

    Just like how overclocking a Pentium 4 resulted in it beating an Athlon 64 and had lower power consumption to boot-- oh wait. Reply
  • SteelCity1981 - Tuesday, March 06, 2012 - link

    That's a stupid comment only a stupid fanboy would make AMD is way ahead of Intel in the graphics department and is very competitive with Intel in the mobile segment now. Reply
  • tipoo - Tuesday, March 06, 2012 - link

    Your comments would do nothing to inform regular readers of sites like this, we already know more. So please, can it. Reply
  • tipoo - Tuesday, March 06, 2012 - link

    Not what I asked little troll. Give a source that says Apple will get a special HD4000 like no other. Reply
  • Operandi - Tuesday, March 06, 2012 - link

    What are you talking about? As long as AMD has a better iGPU there is plenty of reason for them to be viable choice today. And if gaming iGPU performance holds on against Intel there is more than just hope of them getting back in the game in terms of high performance comput tomorrow. Reply
  • tipoo - Tuesday, March 06, 2012 - link

    I'm pretty sure even 16x AF has a sub 2% performance hit on even the lowest end of todays GPUs, is it different with the HD Graphics? If not, why not just enable it like most people would, even on something like a 4670 I max out AF without thinking twice about it, AA still hurts performance though. Reply
  • IntelUser2000 - Tuesday, March 06, 2012 - link

    AF has greater performance impact on low end GPUs. Typically its about 10-15%. It's less on the HD Graphics 3000, only because their 16x AF really only works at much lower levels. It's akin to having option for 1280x1024 resolution, but performing like 1024x768 because it looks like the latter.

    If Ivy Bridge improved AF quality to be on par with AMD/Nvidia, performance loss should be similar as well.
    Reply
  • tipoo - Wednesday, March 07, 2012 - link

    Hmm I did not know that, what component of the GPU is involved in that performance hit (shaders, ROPs, etc)? My card is fairly low end and 16x AF performs nearly no different than 0x. Reply
  • Exophase - Wednesday, March 07, 2012 - link

    AF requires more samples in cases of high anisotropy so I guess the TMU load increases, which may also increase bandwidth requirements since it could force higher LOD in these cases. You'll only see a performance difference if the AF causes the scene to be TMU/bandwidth limited instead of say, ALU limited. I'd expect this to happen more as you move up in performance, not down, since ALU:TEX ratio tends to go up along the higher end.. but APUs can be more bandwidth sensitive and I think Intel's IGPs never had a lot of TMUs.

    Of course it's also very scene dependent. And maybe an inferior AF implementation could end up sampling more than a better one.
    Reply

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