The basic building block of Bulldozer is the dual-core module, pictured below. AMD wanted better performance than simple SMT (ala Hyper Threading) would allow but without resorting to full duplication of resources we get in a traditional dual core CPU. The result is a duplication of integer execution resources and L1 caches, but a sharing of the front end and FPU. AMD still refers to this module as being dual-core, although it's a departure from the more traditional definition of the word. In the early days of multi-core x86 processors, dual-core designs were simply two single core processors stuck on the same package. Today we still see simple duplication of identical cores in a single processor, but moving forward it's likely that we'll see...

Microsoft Releases Hotfix to Improve Bulldozer Performance UPDATE: Pulled

The launch of Bulldozer in October wasn't exactly a success for AMD. In our review, Anand ended up recommending the Intel i5-2500K over AMD FX-8150. One of the reasons...

76 by Kristian Vättö on 12/16/2011

AMD Revises Bulldozer Transistor Count: 1.2B, not 2B

This is a bit unusual. I got an email from AMD PR this week asking me to correct the Bulldozer transistor count in our Sandy Bridge E review...

42 by Anand Lal Shimpi on 12/2/2011

Bulldozer Does It Again: Overclocked to 8.58GHz

Last week, we reported that Andre Yang had managed to overclock AMD's FX-8150 CPU to 8.46GHz, breaking the former record set by AMD. Andre Yang has now been able...

45 by Kristian Vättö on 11/3/2011

The Bulldozer Review: AMD FX-8150 Tested

AMD has been trailing Intel in the x86 performance space for years now. Ever since the introduction of the first Core 2 processors in 2006, AMD hasn't been able...

428 by Anand Lal Shimpi on 10/12/2011

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