Gaming Performance

At this point, the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680's gaming prowess should be relatively well known. AVADirect has elected not to pursue any performance tuning on the GTX 680, but the boost clock should do most of the work for them anyhow given the high thermal headroom of the massive heatsink and fan unit on the card. I do appreciate that NVIDIA got with the times with the Kepler generation and supports more than two simultaneous video outputs (allowing us to test single card systems at surround resolutions); they've even done one better than AMD in this case by not requiring the third video output to be DisplayPort.

Batman: Arkham City

Battlefield 3

Civilization V

DiRT 3

The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim

Portal 2

Total War: Shogun 2

1080p hasn't been an issue for the top end of this generation or the last one; we frequently run into situations where systems are CPU limited. Surround testing is what really pushes modern graphics hardware.

Batman: Arkham City

Battlefield 3

DiRT 3

The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim

Portal 2

Total War: Shogun 2

For the most part, the surround results line up about where you'd expect. The GTX 680 is a strong performer that really only loses its footing in Batman: Arkham City (with its abysmal DirectX 11 implementation) and Battlefield 3 (which just punishes graphics hardware anyhow). People who want to game in surround on this system will have no problem doing so.

Application and Futuremark Performance Build, Noise, Heat, and Power Consumption
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  • StevoLincolnite - Monday, August 27, 2012 - link

    I would even argue that the CPU was a bit of a downgrade. especially going from a 6-core processor to a 4 core processor.
    Heck, for $2,700 I would hope for a Core i7 3930K or at-least an x79 motherboard paired up with the Core i7 3820, so you could at-least drop in an Ivy-Bridge E when they become available.
    Reply
  • Paul Tarnowski - Monday, August 27, 2012 - link

    The last AVADirect PC had a 2700K. The reviewer was comparing the acoustics of that system to his then-current i7-990X. Although yes, that sentence is confusing if you don't follow the link to the review of the previous system. Reply
  • Flunk - Monday, August 27, 2012 - link

    This is a gaming system, single thread performance is key so having 6 slower cores is a detriment. Reply
  • cknobman - Monday, August 27, 2012 - link

    While I am not arguing 4 vs 6 core when it comes to gaming I agree with OP on the point he was trying to make.

    For the absurd price I would expect a 6 core processor in this thing and for everything else outside of games this processor is in fact a downgrade.

    I just built a very very similar rig to this one listed with an i7 3770k for far under $2000.
    Reply
  • Death666Angel - Tuesday, August 28, 2012 - link

    "and for everything else outside of games this processor is in fact a downgrade."
    Did you even read the review of the comments just above you? The predecessor had a i7 2700k @ 4.6GHz at its heart. No 6 core CPU!
    Reply
  • infoilrator - Monday, August 27, 2012 - link

    You can argue the two points, you have to be doing very specialized computing to benefit from more CPU. Second, if you can afford this level of purchase, I suppose an entire new build is practical as a new tech toy.

    It is too bad you cannot transfer the bits into a case you like more.
    Reply
  • Jambe - Monday, August 27, 2012 - link

    Speaking of pre-built computers you're likely to pay too much for; what are the chances you could get a Falcon Northwest Tiki for review? I remember seeing that some time ago and haven't looked to see if there are reviews of it from credible sources.

    I guess I might do a quick search for that.
    Reply
  • Wolfpup - Wednesday, September 12, 2012 - link

    Yeah, I'm actually wondering how the Tiki or Dell's x51 would hold up to being used as a "notebook", thrown in a bag every day and hauled back and forth. They don't seem that much bigger than a large notebook...

    Don't know if they'd physically hold up though.
    Reply
  • iSayuSay - Monday, August 27, 2012 - link

    As usual, spec is okay. But come on, for the price, one would demand more, especially on the look. I never find any sexier case than MacPro, why? These PCs can be more costly than basic quad MacPro. And again, I'm not talking about spec, purely just about look and neat interior placement.
    Can't somebody out there design a great looking case for these boutique design tower?

    My office still have a few 2010 MP laying around and yeah, these babies are just IT tech-wonder, looks clean, easy to upgrade. Everything is in order and super organized. Specs are obviously suck for the money, as usual. But you gotta admit it's the sexiest tower around. Externally and internally.

    Now imagine something like MacMini, only bigger like MacPro. Smooth silver aluminum, less holes and screws and no unnecessary LED would be great. And I'm willing to pay $200 more for the case alone. Thank you.
    Reply
  • Grzesiu - Monday, August 27, 2012 - link

    The only one I can think of would be the HP/Voodoo Blacbird 002 which was ridiculously expensive. I owned one up until a week ago. Fully equipped with C2Q qx9770, 8GB DDR3 1600MHz, SLI GTX280s and a 1300watt modular psu. I still own the hardware which will soon be up for sale on eBay, but I sold the case alone for $850! Reply

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