Today Microsoft announced some very substantial changes to OneDrive storage. OneDrive is of course Microsoft’s consumer cloud storage product, formerly named SkyDrive. When the service first launched in 2007, early users received 5 GB of online storage. This amount was increased to 25 GB per user in 2008. The service was changed again though in 2012 limiting new users to 7 GB of free storage, however existing users could be grandfathered into the old 25 GB tier, and at that time the free storage tier was more storage than competing cloud storage solutions such as Google Drive and Dropbox.

Times have changed though, and responding to the recent free storage increases and paid storage price drops implemented by Google, Microsoft has now increased the free storage pool to 15 GB. According to Microsoft’s internal data, 75% of users have less than 15 GB in their OneDrive at the moment, with the remainder likely being on some sort of paid tier. This is certainly a bonus to anyone who is using OneDrive or thinking of using it, but the big news comes attached to a subscription service.

On April 28th, OneDrive for Business announced a file storage increased from 25 GB per user to 1 TB per user coming in the next couple of months, and now that same 1 TB per user is coming to all subscribers of Office 365. Office 365 Home, Personal, and University subscriptions will all include the 1 TB of storage starting in July. Let’s go over what each tier gives you and their pricing:

 

Office 365 Consumer Versions
  University Personal Home
Number of Users 1 1 5
Number of Devices 2 PCs, Macs, or Tablets 1 PC or Mac, and 1 Tablet 5 PCs or Macs, and 5 Tablets
Included Applications Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, Outlook, Publisher, Access
Skype Minutes 60 Skype world minutes per month
OneDrive Storage 1 TB 1 TB x 5 Users (5 TB total)
Pricing $79.99/4 years $6.99/month
$69.99/year
$9.99/month
$99.99/year

Office 365 Home has just had a big amount of value added to it. For $100/year, users now have access to 5 TB of online storage, as well as the complete Office Suite for five people. Even if just looking at the storage available, this is a big advantage for OneDrive over the competition right now with Google offering 1 TB of storage for $120 alone.

But what if you don’t need Office? OneDrive has also had its price slashed for just storage tiers by 70% to be competitive with Google Drive:

 

Consumer Cloud Offerings
  OneDrive Google Drive iCloud DropBox Box Amazon Cloud Drive
Free Storage 15 GB 15 GB 5 GB 2 GB 10 GB 5 GB
Paid Storage (USD/year) 100 GB - $24
200 GB - $48
1 TB - $70 (With Office 365 Personal)
5 TB - $100 (5 x 1 TB w/Office 365 Home)
100 GB - $24
1 TB - $120
10 TB - $1200
20 TB - $2400
30 TB - $3600
20 GB - $12
200 GB - $50
Tiers up to 1 TB not priced yet
100 GB - $99
200 GB - $199
500 GB - $499
100 GB - $120 20 GB - $10
50 GB - $25
100 GB - $50
200 GB - $100
500 GB - $250
1 TB - $500
Versioning Office files (30 days) Yes (30 days) No Yes (30 days)
Unlimited with PackRat addon
No (Personal Tier) No
File Restore Yes (30 days) Yes (30 days) No Yes (30 days)
Unlimited with PackRat addon
Yes (30 days) Yes
Operating System Support Windows
OS X
Android
iOS
Windows Phone
Windows
OS X
Chrome OS
Android
iOS
Windows
OS X
iOS
Windows
OS X
Linux
Android
iOS
BlackBerry
Kindle Fire
Windows
OS X
Android
iOS
Windows Phone
BlackBerry
Windows
OS X
Android
iOS
Kindle Fire

Clearly Microsoft is hoping to get some consumer lock-in with these tiers as it would be difficult to move away from their services if you have a couple of hundred gigabytes of data stored with them. Whether it works or not will remain to be seen but it’s an impressive offering, and something that other cloud storage vendors can’t really compete against because like it or not, Office is still an important tool for a lot of people. When Office 365 first launched, it was an interesting idea to try to migrate people from pay once own forever software to a subscription service, but at the time the value-add wasn’t really there other than always having the latest version. Considering a lot of people may only have bought Office Home and Student for around $100 (which allowed up to three installs) it was a tough sell to try and get people to switch over to paying $100/year for basically the same service. Today’s addition as well as the recent tie-in of Office365 with both the iPad and Android versions of Office can possibly sway people who were on the fence. 

 

Source: OneDrive Blog

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  • solidus-flux - Monday, June 23, 2014 - link

    See only "coming soon" for the 1TB option for OneDrive for Business:

    https://onedrive.live.com/about/en-us/plans/

    and

    http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/business/compare...
    Reply
  • Brett Howse - Monday, June 23, 2014 - link

    Yes coming soon - https://blog.onedrive.com/1tb-for-every-business-u... Reply
  • solidus-flux - Monday, June 23, 2014 - link

    Ah, my apologies. When I saw you date the announcement, I was thinking they were announcing that it was live, not announcing that it was planned. In any event, a month is not far off. Thanks for the great article. Reply
  • althaz - Monday, June 23, 2014 - link

    1TB with Office subs is crazy-good. Google Drive had the cheapest 1TB pricing at $120. For $20 less you can get 1TB for 5 different users, plus Office for 5 people. Pretty awesome value, IMO.

    That said, how many people really want/need this much space? I wouldn't have thought the market for folks wanting massive amounts of storage would be all that big (although I'm one of the people in that market).
    Reply
  • sherlockwing - Monday, June 23, 2014 - link

    I(have Office 365 University) have only 1 use for that 1TB storage: store my Computer's C(OS) and D(data) drive's Arconis True Image backup file(740GB) in the cloud. Reply
  • sherlockwing - Monday, June 23, 2014 - link

    Although 740GB is probably bigger than their single file size limitation. Reply
  • althaz - Monday, June 23, 2014 - link

    It is, the max file size is 2Gb, IIRC. Reply
  • althaz - Monday, June 23, 2014 - link

    WinRAR to the rescue? Reply
  • jramskov - Tuesday, June 24, 2014 - link

    For Office documents? Hardly. Pictures and videos? I currently have around 250GB images and video...

    Anyone got experience with One Drive and OS X?
    Reply
  • Roland00Address - Monday, June 23, 2014 - link

    What is the largest file size on one drive?

    Expected Speeds for downloading or uploading?
    Reply

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