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Video Transcoding Performance

x264 HD 3.03 Benchmark

Graysky's x264 HD test uses x264 to encode a 4Mbps 720p MPEG-2 source. The focus here is on quality rather than speed, thus the benchmark uses a 2-pass encode and reports the average frame rate in each pass.

x264 HD Benchmark - 1st pass - v3.03

x264 HD Benchmark - 2nd pass - v3.03

CPU based video transcode performance is as good as it can get from AMD here given the 2/4 module/core setup of these Trinity APUs. Intel's Core i3 3220 is a bit slower than the A10-5800K. We're switching to a much newer version of the x264 HD benchmark for our new test suite (5.0.1). Some early results are below if you want to see how things change under the new test:

x264 HD 5.0.1 Benchmark
  1st Pass 2nd Pass
AMD A10-5800K (3.8GHz) 33.5 fps 7.41 fps
AMD A8-5600K (3.6GHz) 32.2 fps 7.12 fps
Intel Core i3 3220 (3.3GHz) 35.2 fps 6.61 fps
Content Creation Performance Discrete GPU Gaming Performance
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  • bill4 - Tuesday, October 02, 2012 - link

    "Can easily upgrade down the line" pretty much misses the point imo.

    Theoretically, this thing might be for casuals who are never going to upgrade, or people who need to pinch every last penny, or people who want a general purpose machine that isn't a total dog when they wanna game now and again, etc.
    Reply
  • LancerVI - Tuesday, October 02, 2012 - link

    THIS^^^

    I agree 100%. Trinity is perfect for a great kids/wife general use computer. Websurfing and minecraft or wizard 101.

    As long as they stay off my machine, we're good!
    Reply
  • Spunjji - Tuesday, October 02, 2012 - link

    Yes, but you shouldn't expect people who didn't even read the conclusion to the article to pay any attention to what you have to say here. :( Reply
  • parkerm35 - Tuesday, October 02, 2012 - link

    $70 will get you a nice GT630 which is slower than the 7660D! And then when it comes to threaded tasks, you will be left waiting an eternity. Nice plan.... Reply
  • ac2 - Tuesday, October 02, 2012 - link

    Actually I said "That puts a $50 saving towards...", I certainly didn't say that would be the total price!

    Highly threaded integer tasks are a rarity for me so...
    Reply
  • CaptainDoug - Tuesday, October 02, 2012 - link

    why'd you pick a GT630? there's a 6670 for $65 that's roughly twice as powerful as the GT630. It would end up being like 35% more powerful than a 7660D. Reply
  • Jamahl - Tuesday, October 02, 2012 - link

    Did you see how far the Pentium was behind in multi threading? It will not beat the A10 in gaming in most cases but feel free to waste money on a dual core if you want. Reply
  • mattlach - Tuesday, October 02, 2012 - link

    Multithreading is still mostly irrelevant in most Games.

    Yes, there are a couple of games that support it pretty well well (Battlefield 3, Civilization 5) but the vast majority of games out there are still of the "load one core 100% and load a second (and possibly third) core 15-20%" variety.

    In these circumstances two fast cores are going to beat 4, 6 or 8 slow cores almost every time.

    It's not about IPC, and its not about clock speed. It's about the combination of the two. Per core performance is still king, and I don't think this is going to change any time soon due to the difficulties involved in writing good multithreaded code, and Amdahls law.
    ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amdahls_law )
    Reply
  • bji - Tuesday, October 02, 2012 - link

    Yeah, but aren't *PC's* irrelevant in most Games? Reply
  • Jamahl - Tuesday, October 02, 2012 - link

    According to kitguru, the 5800K + 7970 GHz edition beats the i3 2105 in every single game at 1080p. Reply

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