Achieving Retina

To make the MacBook Pro’s Retina Display a reality Apple had to work with panel vendors to build the panels it wanted at a reasonable cost, as well as deliver the software necessary to support insanely high resolutions. There was another problem Apple faced in making the rMBP a reality: the display pipeline of the GPUs Apple wanted to use didn't officially support scaling to the resolution Apple demanded of them. Let me explain.

All modern GPUs have fixed function scaling hardware that is used to efficiently scale between resolutions. A scaler either in your GPU or in your display panel is what lets you run non-native resolutions at full screen on your LCD (e.g. running 1680 x 1050 on a 1920 x 1080 panel). None of the GPUs used in the Retina Display MacBook Pro officially support fixed-function scaling of 3840 x 2400 or 3360 x 2100 to 2880 x 1800 however. Modern day GPUs are tested against 2560 x 1440 and 2560 x 1600, but not this particular 5MP resolution. Even 4K resolution support isn’t widespread among what’s available today. Rather than wait for updated hardware and/or validation, Apple took matters into its own hands and built its own GPU accelerated scaling routines for these higher resolutions. Fixed function hardware is almost always more efficient from a performance and power standpoint, which is why there’s some additional performance loss in these scaled resolution modes. 

What’s even crazier is Apple wasn’t pleased with the difference in baseline filtering quality between the Intel HD 4000 and NVIDIA GeForce GT 650M GPUs. As the Retina Display MacBook Pro would have to regularly switch between GPUs, Apple wanted to ensure a consistently good experience regardless of which GPU was active. There are a lot of filtering operations at work when doing all of this resolution scaling, so rather than compromise user experience Apple simply wrote its own default filtering routines. Since you want your upscale and downscale quality to be identical, Apple had to roll its own implementation on both. Apple’s obsessive attention to detail really made it possible to pull all of this off. It’s just insane to think about.

The Software Side of Retina: Making it All Work Driving the Retina Display: A Performance Discussion
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  • seapeople - Sunday, June 24, 2012 - link

    Wow, is that the Sony everyone here has been harping about "outdoing Apple" years ago?

    Reading that review basically says that while the general specs of that Sony are outstanding, every other possible aspect of user experience (keyboard, hinge design, trackpad, thermals, and noise) is completely terrible.

    Oh, and it looks like it costs more than the rMBP and comes loaded with bloatware.

    There's a reason that didn't get an Editor's choice award, and it's not some great conspiracy...
    Reply
  • OCedHrt - Monday, June 25, 2012 - link

    Not really. You can buy it without the bloatware, you just need to select Windows Pro. They got a review unit from Sony, and Sony shipped them their "consumer" version which is loaded with bloatware (although I agree, that is even more reason to not have bloatware).

    The hinge is by design and something Sony engineers are quite proud of. Not everyone likes it when something is different, especially when it comes to keyboards.

    Simply read the comments (http://www.anandtech.com/Show/Index/5530?cPage=5&a... and you can see only the reviewer had an issue with the hinge that he couldn't even explain very well.

    I have been using the Z1 for 2 years now and the experience is awesome. It may just take some time to get used to a small laptop.

    Trackpad can glitch every once in a while and for noise you can make it silent in the Sony control center (change fan from performance to silent).

    There is always going to be fan noise in a high end laptop when stressing the system. This applies to the rMBP as well (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=13918...
    Reply
  • Spunjji - Tuesday, June 26, 2012 - link

    Moron. Reply
  • mlambert890 - Thursday, November 29, 2012 - link

    Were you two on the design team of the Z? LOL!

    You just called the guy a moron for pointing out why *ANAND* didnt like the Z.

    OK you guys are right. The Z is amazing and it is a crime against humanity that only you and your fellow crusader "get it". Sony should be the #1 PC maker rather than approaching junk bond status and it is only Apples "marketing hype" their ability to "buy off" guys like Anand and the "stupidity" of everyone on earth (except you two) that keeps Apple profitable. What an amazingly arrogant pile of crap that is

    Im a huge Vaio fan and Im 100% sure Ive spent more on them than you two have combined over the years and even *I* think the two of you sound nuts.
    Reply
  • UltraTech79 - Saturday, June 23, 2012 - link

    You're talking out your ass. Reply
  • KoolAidMan1 - Saturday, June 23, 2012 - link

    Amazing argument.

    Truth hurts dude, sorry
    Reply
  • KoolAidMan1 - Saturday, June 23, 2012 - link

    Nothing you noted is cutting edge, and it is also thicker and heavier than Apple's machines Reply
  • OCedHrt - Sunday, June 24, 2012 - link

    How is 2.5 lbs and 0.66" thick thicker and heavier than Apple's machines? Apple does not have a single laptop lighter and thinner than Sony's Z. Not even the ridiculously slow MBA can compete. Reply
  • KoolAidMan1 - Monday, June 25, 2012 - link

    Since when were Ivy Bridge i5 and i7 CPUs ridiculously slow? Reply
  • Spunjji - Tuesday, June 26, 2012 - link

    Comparatively? Since forever. Stop trying to undermine people's valid arguments by failing to read them, jackass. Reply

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