I mentioned in our Mid-Range SSD Roundup that most SSD vendors like sampling the best balance of capacity/performance when it comes to SSD review samples. For the SandForce SF-2281 with 25nm NAND that just happens to be 240GB. Unfortunately there's a pretty big fall off in performance when going from 240GB to 120GB due to the decrease in total number of NAND die (8GB per die x 32 die vs. 16 die). I've explained this all before here.

Enter OCZ's MAX IOPS drive. Using 32nm Toshiba Toggle NAND instead of 25nm IMFT ONFI 2.x NAND the die capacity drops to 4GB, which means you get twice as many die per NAND device. The end result? 240GB Vertex 3 performance for slightly more than 120GB Vertex 3 pricing.

 

I ordered the 120GB MAX IOPS drive at the beginning of the week and just got it in yesterday so I've only had a small amount of time to test with it thus far. Check out the 120GB MAX IOPS drive vs. the Intel SSD 510 in Bench using our 2011 storage test suite. Expect the full review in the coming days.

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  • L. - Friday, June 17, 2011 - link

    IF you have a doubt, go ahead and determine the compressibility of your data :

    Take all you want to store on the ssd, right click add to winrar archive, best level of compression and then you'll have an idea.

    I think you are clearly underestimating the amount of uncompressed data that is normally stored on an ssd (os, programs, games).
    Reply
  • Jeff72 - Thursday, June 16, 2011 - link

    If you buy an OCZ SSD, I strongly recommend you buy it form somewhere local or from a vendor with excellent return policy in case you get blue screens.

    Intel SSDs are just more reliable.
    Reply
  • L. - Friday, June 17, 2011 - link

    Unfounded if it's based on that.
    The truth is EVERYTHING should be compressed, or nothing . or ... whatever

    The reality is that most stuff is not compressed, most game installs are not compressed (hey it took one dvd now it spans 16 gigs .. what do you guess :p) etc.

    You're not going to use that ssd for fully compressed stuff like video, photo or music, so you will enjoy a great deal of compression acceleration.
    Reply
  • Belard - Friday, June 17, 2011 - link

    Are you the real L? Reply
  • lenghui - Thursday, June 16, 2011 - link

    Anand, Do you have any articles about running VM on SSD? I am thinking in terms of performance, life span, and pros vs cons. I know there are many aspects to consider (Windows Hyper-V vs VMWare vs Xen). There are some discussions out there, but most are theoretical and based on personal opinion. I figure why not ask the expert (AT) and its expert readers. Many thanks. Reply
  • L. - Friday, June 17, 2011 - link

    SSD excellent for VM's because of the IOPS/G ratio, however there are many known issues in hypervisors regarding disk io -> the bigger part of your solution is in software, not hardware, even though SSD's can handle many times more VM's per disk than HDD's. Reply
  • semo - Friday, June 17, 2011 - link

    I've been looking for more VM coverage as well but it seems that it is not a high priority for most review sites. VMs benefit a lot from high IOPS but the general consensus amongst the public and critics is that "we have enough IOPS". Obviously I don't agree but if you look at the success of the Intel 510 (lower IOPS than predecessor) it seems that the industry might be heading that way. Reply
  • lenghui - Friday, June 17, 2011 - link

    @L. and @semo,
    Thank you.
    Reply
  • Movieman420 - Friday, June 17, 2011 - link

    Why on earth would SF/Ocz issue a recall when 99 percent of V3 owners have ZERO issues??? Atm they are looking for the proverbial needle in a haystack. Ocz support has reached out trying to find a customer with the bsod issue that is located near the SF bay area so they can send an engineer out to do a full workup for the first time on a known problem machine. Later the thread was removed as they most likely found someone. It's just a matter of time. All signs point to a power issue as the bsod occurs because the drive suddenly disappears because it loses power for whatever reason. Reply
  • chrnochime - Friday, June 17, 2011 - link

    Your posts seem awfully supportive of them .... Reply

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