CPU Bound Gaming Performance

While we always try to run our gaming benchmarks in CPU reviews as a balance between being CPU and GPU bound, there is some merit to using CPU bound gaming scenarios as a true measure of the gaming power of a CPU. 

The previous pages of gaming benchmarks were run at 1600 x 1200, which struck a good balance between being CPU and GPU bound on our CrossFire setup but here we’re looking at exactly how good of a gaming CPU the Core 2 Duo is.  By running these tests at 640 x 480 with the same CrossFire setup as before we’re ensuring that the performance bottlenecks in these titles shift as far as possible from the GPU and onto the CPU. 

These tests aren’t designed to tell you how fast these CPUs are at running these games, but rather how quickly they can run through the physics and AI code when not waiting on the graphics card at all. 

We chose to look at two CPUs: the Core 2 Extreme X6800 and the Athlon 64 FX-62, to get an idea of how strong each architecture was at pure physics/AI processing in games.  We also omitted any games whose performance didn’t change by dropping the resolution from 1600 x 1200 to 640 x 480 (meaning that those games were already predominantly CPU limited in our previous tests). 

 CPU Quake 4 HL2 Ep 1 F.E.A.R.  BF2
AMD Athlon 64 FX-62 156.7 170.0 164.0 108.7
Intel Core 2 Extreme X6800 192.5 263.5 236.0 142.3
Advantage (Intel) 22.8% 55.0% 43.9% 30.9%

 

In terms of sheer ability to process physics and AI as well as feed a hungry graphics subsystem, Intel's Core 2 Extreme X6800 is anywhere between 22 and 55% faster than AMD's Athlon 64 FX-62. 

While this doesn't mean much for real world gaming, it does cement the fact that Intel's Core 2 processor is significantly faster at the type of code current 3D games will throw at it.  The very same benchmarks that Intel used to complain about favoring AMD, now favor Intel just as much; oh how times have changed.

Gaming Performance using Oblivion Overclocking
POST A COMMENT

200 Comments

View All Comments

  • bob661 - Friday, July 14, 2006 - link

    quote:

    Dude, 20% is a HUGE margin when you are talking competitive benchmarks.
    I agree. 20% is huge and noticeable.
    Reply
  • Chadder007 - Friday, July 14, 2006 - link

    AMD's midrange holds up pretty well but when you go higher the Core2 crushes AMD this time.
    I would really like to see some X64bit benchmarks though to see how they will both fair with the future OSs.
    Reply
  • Gary Key - Friday, July 14, 2006 - link

    quote:

    I would really like to see some X64bit benchmarks though to see how they will both fair with the future OSs.
    Coming shortly along with MCE2005......
    Reply
  • bob661 - Friday, July 14, 2006 - link

    quote:

    f I were to upgrade to the cheapest solo I would probably have to pay 500 dollars or more (new cpu, mb and memory) and I will probably get ~ performance in games. I stopped overclokcing a long time ago
    Don't confuse the Core Solo with the Core 2 Duo. The Solo is still Netburst whereas the Core 2 Duo is a new architecture.
    Reply
  • DrMrLordX - Friday, July 14, 2006 - link

    Um what? Core Solo isn't Netburst. It's a single-core version of Yonah as I recall. Basically, it's similar to a Dothan. Reply
  • bob661 - Friday, July 14, 2006 - link

    quote:

    Um what? Core Solo isn't Netburst. It's a single-core version of Yonah as I recall. Basically, it's similar to a Dothan.
    Which is still Netburst.
    Reply
  • mlittl3 - Friday, July 14, 2006 - link

    Uh, no. Banias, Dothan, Yonah are not at all based on netburst. They are all P6 derivatives that use the netburst quad-pumped FSB. The Core Solo is a Yonah single core that has more in common with the PIII than the P4. The Core 2 Solo coming next year will be based on Conroe which of course is not Netburst. The ONLY, I repeat, ONLY netburst CPUs (not including Xeons) are the Pentium 4, Pentium D, Celeron D. There were mobile Pentium 4's on the netburst architecture but these haven't been used in years.

    The Pentium M (Banias and Dothan) is NOT based on netburst but a redesigned architecture based on the research in Israel.
    Reply
  • mlittl3 - Friday, July 14, 2006 - link

    And in case you try to stupidly refute me, list the number of pipelines that are in Banias, Dothan and Yonah. If the answer is less than 20, then it is NOT netburst.

    Oh wait, here is the answer right here.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_P6">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_P6

    A direct quote:
    "It[Banias] has very limited system bandwidth, as compared to NetBurst and AMD64..."

    Since Banias is not netburst and Dothan is based off of Banias and Yonah is based on Dothan, then...wait for it...all three are not netburst. Have a nice day! :)
    Reply
  • bob661 - Friday, July 14, 2006 - link

    I don't refute facts. :) Reply
  • mlittl3 - Friday, July 14, 2006 - link

    Man after my own heart. :) Reply

Log in

Don't have an account? Sign up now