Today Google announced that they are moving into the WiFi router market. The new router is produced through a partnership with TP-Link and it's called OnHub. Google is marketing OnHub as a router that is simple to setup, effortless to maintain, and highly reliable. Much like Apple's AirPort Extreme, the OnHub is a very tall router in order to integrate internal antennas, and it is managed via an app for your iOS or Android device. The mobile app will also allow you to see which devices are using bandwidth, and to apply QoS rules to limit devices from using too much. During setup it will automatically select the best channel for minimal interference, and can adjust on its own as necessary. Software updates are also automatically downloaded and applied, which makes it essentially self maintaining as long as Google's promise of reliable connectivity is met.

As far as specifications go, OnHub is marketed as an AC 1900 router which really says it's a 3x3 802.11ac router that which has a data rate of 1300Mbps on an 802.11ac link and 600Mbps on an 802.11n link. In addition to being a dead simple WiFi router, OnHub also comes with support for the major protocols which will be used by home automation devices, including Bluetooth Smart, Google Brillo/Weave, and IEEE 802.15.4. The OnHub router is available for preorder now from various retailers in the US, and both the blue and black versions cost $199

Source: Official Google Blog

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  • SpaceRanger - Tuesday, August 18, 2015 - link

    Don't trust Google at all. It's just a matter of time before we find out that Google's been snooping on your network usage in order to target you with more "meaningful" ads. Reply
  • r3loaded - Tuesday, August 18, 2015 - link

    On the flip side, they'll be much quicker at releasing firmware patches for security vulnerabilities compared to your typical router manufacturer. Reply
  • SpartanJet - Tuesday, August 18, 2015 - link

    Yes just like its quick to release patches for ALL versions of Android when a vulnerability is found....oh wait.... Reply
  • tipoo - Tuesday, August 18, 2015 - link

    Except this is a single piece of hardware with no carriers in the way. Reply
  • Shadow7037932 - Tuesday, August 18, 2015 - link

    It was fixed it in AOSP very quickly. The problem is OEMs and carriers are slow as shit to push it out to the masses. Reply
  • r3loaded - Tuesday, August 18, 2015 - link

    They've patched the Stagefright bug on my old Nexus 4 quite quickly. The problem starts when companies that don't take security seriously get in the way. Reply
  • lilo777 - Tuesday, August 18, 2015 - link

    Even if it was true would not you rather prefer meaningful ads to the meaningless ones? With ads being such a huge part of Google business I am pretty sure they are making everything possible to keep your private data safe because if something nefarious were to happen to your data their entire business would have collapsed. Reply
  • nils_ - Monday, September 07, 2015 - link

    That almost never happens. Reply
  • quidpro - Tuesday, August 18, 2015 - link

    This is the same old stale reply to basically everything google does. Are there any enlightened responses from seemingly IT minded people who aren't channeling a grumpy 55 year old clinging to their XP Start Menus and the word meaningful in scare quotes? Reply
  • kaidenshi - Wednesday, August 19, 2015 - link

    Careful, your bias is showing. Don't want to be too obvious there. Reply

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