Test Setup

As we mentioned in our introduction, Intel's 9-series chipset were designed from the start to allow future compatibility with Broadwell. As a result with a BIOS update we're able to drop these processors into our existing MSI and ASUS Z97 boards, though not without some pre-release BIOS teething issues.

Test Setup
Processor Intel i7-5775C, 4C/8T
Intel i5-5675C, 4C/4T
Motherboard MSI Z97A Gaming 6
ASUS Z97 Pro
DRAM G.Skill RipjawsZ 4x4GB DDR3-1866 C9 at DDR3-1600
Low End GPU Integrated
ASUS R7 240 2GB DDR3
Dual Graphics with R7 240
Mid Range GPU MSI R9 285 Gaming 2GB
MSI GTX 770 Lightning 2GB
High End GPU MSI R9 290X Gaming LE 4GB
ASUS GTX 980 Strix 4GB
Power Supply OCZ 1250W Gold
Storage Drive Crucial MX200 1TB
Operating System Windows 7.1 64-bit, Build 7601
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Nepton 140XL CLC

Many thanks to...

We must thank the following companies for kindly providing hardware for our test bed:

Thank you to AMD for providing us with the R9 290X 4GB GPUs.
Thank you to ASUS for providing us with GTX 980 Strix GPUs and the R7 240 DDR3 GPU.
Thank you to ASRock and ASUS for providing us with some IO testing kit.
Thank you to Cooler Master for providing us with Nepton 140XL CLCs.
Thank you to Corsair for providing us with an AX1200i PSU.
Thank you to Crucial for providing us with MX200 SSDs.
Thank you to G.Skill and Corsair for providing us with memory.
Thank you to MSI for providing us with the GTX 770 Lightning GPUs.
Thank you to OCZ for providing us with PSUs.
Thank you to Rosewill for providing us with PSUs and RK-9100 keyboards.

Load Delta Power Consumption

We'll start things off with a look at power consumption. Power consumption was tested on the system while in a single NVIDIA GTX 770 configuration with a wall meter connected to the OCZ 1250W power supply. This power supply is Gold rated, and as I am in the UK on a 230-240 V supply, leads to ~75% efficiency > 50W, and 90%+ efficiency at 250W, suitable for both idle and multi-GPU loading. This method of power reading allows us to compare the power management of the UEFI and the board to supply components with power under load, and includes typical PSU losses due to efficiency.

We are reporting the power consumption difference when idle and during an initial OCCT load. This is slightly skewed by the adjustment up the efficiency chain of our power supply, showing lower power CPUs consuming a little more, but despite this the qualitative comparison is a still a good place to start.

Power Consumption Delta: Idle to AVX

Despite our test being almost qualitative, it is exciting to see that in our power consumption limit test both CPUs score around their TDP values.

SKUs, Chipsets, & More Office and Web Performance
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  • nandnandnand - Tuesday, June 2, 2015 - link

    A10-7870K is listed as $137 and A10-7850K as $173 Reply
  • Ian Cutress - Tuesday, June 2, 2015 - link

    $137 is the launch price of the A10-7870K.
    $173 was the launch price of the A10-7850K.

    We mentioned why we do launch pricing in our graphs in previous reviews, but it comes down to our graphs not being dynamically linked to a retailer and we have to pick a point that's suitable over time. Launch pricing does that, even though there might be future discounts over time.
    Reply
  • nandnandnand - Tuesday, June 2, 2015 - link

    Ok, that makes sense.

    Business opportunity: add a drop down to switch from launch price to "live price" for Newegg/Amazon/etc., hyperlink live prices, get a cut from every click.
    Reply
  • AS118 - Saturday, June 6, 2015 - link

    I agree with nand. Other sites do this, and it's helpful to me because I often read reviews to make a purchase anyway, and it helps me see what the price is right now. Reply
  • FlushedBubblyJock - Sunday, June 14, 2015 - link

    Take a look at how much the GTX980 stomps the amd 290X above - in the review here where they aren't concerned and paying attention and picking the best games for amd gimpy hardware.

    Just look at the FPS difference... let it sin in - the reviewers haphazardly reveal the truth when they are not intending to.
    Reply
  • bloodroses75 - Wednesday, June 17, 2015 - link

    Oh look, a current gen video card beat a last gen card that is just over half the price.

    You may want to try waiting until the 300 series is released/ bench marked before spouting how superior one is over the other. If the 300 series ends up being a dud (which it kinda looks like it will), so be it; at least it will be an 'apple to apple' comparison.
    Reply
  • MrSpadge - Tuesday, June 2, 2015 - link

    You don't need dynamically updated prices. simply pick the prices around the release date of the new hardware. If the price of a 1 or 2 years old comparison chip was lowered significantly (yes, this still happens sometimes), comparing it based on launch price is misleading and will always make some people shout "unfair". You easily fix this. Reply
  • taltamir - Tuesday, June 9, 2015 - link

    I agree, the obvious thing to do is use the price as it is during the time the article was written.
    That means launch price for the item being reviewed and current prices for all items it is being compared to
    Reply
  • ImSpartacus - Tuesday, June 2, 2015 - link

    Since you have to do a "snapshot" pricing for these reviews, you may want to consider looking at average pricing at the time of review. At least then the time frame for each snap shot is the same. Reply
  • nathanddrews - Tuesday, June 2, 2015 - link

    There's a fine line between "just enough" information and "too much". Prices for CPUs vary greatly depending on where you buy them. Reply

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