Cold Test Results

For the testing of PSUs, we are using high precision electronic loads with a maximum power draw of 2700 Watts, a Rigol DS5042M 40 MHz oscilloscope, an Extech 380803 power analyzer, two high precision UNI-T UT-325 digital thermometers, an Extech HD600 SPL meter, a self-designed hotbox, and various other bits and parts. For a thorough explanation of our testing methodology and more details on our equipment, please refer to our How We Test PSUs - 2014 Pipeline post.

The performance of the FSP Aurum PT 1200W at room temperature is very good. The efficiency peaks at 94.3%, with an average of 93.4% within the nominal load range (20% to 100% of the unit's capacity). Even though the efficiency degrades swiftly at low loads, the drop is not as great as with other similar units, most likely due to the full bridge configuration of the primary inversion circuit.

Due to the high efficiency, the Aurum PT maintains low temperatures and can operate rather quietly. The unit is actually almost entirely silent up to 60% load, at which point the fan starts to speed up and becomes audible. Even at maximum load, the Aurum PT is audible but the sound pressure level should be comfortable for most users. Assuming that you can keep a 1200W unit fully loaded for prolonged periods of time, of course.

The FSP Aurum PT 1200W PSU Hot Test Results
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  • Hrel - Thursday, October 16, 2014 - link

    Starts at 30db? Not interested. Reply
  • kmmatney - Thursday, October 16, 2014 - link

    "The unit is actually almost entirely silent up to 60% load, at which point the fan starts to speed up and becomes audible. " Reply
  • Death666Angel - Thursday, October 16, 2014 - link

    Pretty sure they don't have a sound proof room to test, so 30dB is their noise floor. Reply
  • bsim500 - Saturday, October 18, 2014 - link

    "Pretty sure they don't have a sound proof room to test, so 30dB is their noise floor."

    ^ This. The only "quiet sound testing" which is useful these days is from SPCR (SilentPCReview) who built their own anechoic chamber with a single digit noise floor, and are very nitpickety over the quality of the sound too (clicking, buzzing, coil whine, turbulence, etc).
    Reply
  • just4U - Thursday, October 16, 2014 - link

    It seems a bit silly that they'd make the chassis look so nice only to slack off with the cables.. I expect that (but don't like seeing it..) in cheap units.. but not in higher end products that try to hit all the key points. FSP you can do better. Reply
  • wetwareinterface - Thursday, October 16, 2014 - link

    this supply is a quality unit, gives 1200 watts, and is only $240. fancy cables means you up the price to $300 plus. and the market for sleeved cables is really small and served best by the custom choices out there.

    after you spend an extra $100 on sleeved cables you want them in a color to match your build not whatever color fsp decided to give everyone.
    Reply
  • Gigaplex - Thursday, October 16, 2014 - link

    Simply using all-black wiring would be sufficient in most cases and not cost any extra. The multicoloured wiring doesn't look good in any build. Reply
  • just4U - Friday, October 17, 2014 - link

    exactly. Reply
  • eek2121 - Friday, October 17, 2014 - link

    Take it from someone who works for a company that owns a large portion of the (braided) sleeving market. If you are charging your customers a markup for what amounts to $0.25 worth of sleeving...you are doing it wrong. Reply
  • just4U - Friday, October 17, 2014 - link

    A lot of people who build computers want a nice clean uniform look to it all... it's not really even a plus anymore but rather a requirement. It doesn't necessarily add to the cost either and if it does it's certainly not by the amount your suggesting. That's not to say you can't spend that much with aftermarket items and/or certain themed products but it's not normally something that adds a ton to the overall pricing. Reply

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