While Corsair cases are almost uniformly excellent for liquid cooling and the Obsidian 750D will no doubt be another success story in that respect, the monkey on Corsair's back has always been air cooling performance. Outside of the appropriately named Carbide Air 540, none of their cases has really had excellent air cooling, but up until the full fat testbed, Corsair's balanced approach with the 750D actually does a pretty solid job.

CPU Load Temperatures (Stock)

GPU Load Temperatures (Stock)

SSD Load Temperatures (Stock)

Stock air cooling performance is at least pretty respectable and competitive. It's not the monster that, say, the Air 540 is (let alone the SilverStone Fortress FT04), but it holds its own.

Idle Noise Levels (Stock)

Load Noise Levels (Stock)

For at least stock testing, the Obsidian 750D is able to hit that middle ground pretty nicely. Load noise is better than a lot of the competing cases; SilverStone's FT04 has worlds better thermals on the CPU, but it's much louder in the process (though it can be tuned to a more pleasing balance of noise and performance depending on the end user's taste.)

CPU Load Temperatures (Overclocked)

GPU Load Temperatures (Overclocked)

SSD Load Temperatures (Overclocked)

Overclocked thermal performance is surprisingly strong. The 750D isn't leading the pack, but it's posting closer to the top and maybe a degree and a half behind the beefier Air 540.

Idle Noise Levels (Overclocked)

Load Noise Levels (Overclocked)

Noise levels prove to be a victory for Corsair, but they're still struggling to beat NZXT's Phantom 630, which runs both quieter and cooler. This is a step in the right direction and the difference between the cases is small enough that you can probably go with whichever you prefer. Corsair really needs to step their game up to compete with NZXT, though; Corsair makes arguably better liquid cooling cases, but NZXT doesn't make you choose.

CPU Load Temperatures (Full Fat)

Top GPU Load Temperatures (Full Fat)

Bottom GPU Load Temperatures (Full Fat)

SSD Load Temperatures (Full Fat)

Highest HDD Load Temperatures (Full Fat)

Our full fat testbed unfortunately hits the limits of the Obsidian 750D's stock cooling configuration. Thermals are mostly competitive but measurably weaker than the competition. The traditional ATX layout typically just plain needs more airflow when faced with this much of a thermal load.

Idle Noise Levels (Full Fat)

Load Noise Levels (Full Fat)

The 750D winds up being one of the louder cases as a result. Corsair's thermal target clearly wasn't something as grueling as this type of system, but this highlights the value of having either PWM fans or a built-in fan controller. Either will allow the case to be more flexible in terms of the systems it can support instead of starting to hit limits.

Testing Methodology Conclusion
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  • cbgoding - Tuesday, September 24, 2013 - link

    This is so close to the case I've been waiting for! If somebody made a soundproofed case with this much radiator support at a similar price point I'd be all over it, but this is probably close enough. Reply
  • hero1 - Tuesday, September 24, 2013 - link

    I am on the same boat as you. Too bad I am currently modifying my Fractal Design Define XL R2 to fit 2 x 360 mm rads. I think I might snatch one If they ever make another one like this with capability to take 2 x 360 mm thick rads (up to 65 mm). Other than that, it's a good case. Reply
  • cbgoding - Tuesday, September 24, 2013 - link

    You got a build thread for that? Reply
  • ggathagan - Tuesday, September 24, 2013 - link

    You could do the soundproof work yourself. There are a number of on-line vendors that carry the damping material. Reply
  • cbgoding - Tuesday, September 24, 2013 - link

    And stick it to the inside of the window? if corsair offers a windowless version, then sure that route would work perfectly. Reply
  • Guernb2 - Tuesday, October 15, 2013 - link

    I bet the if side panels are reversible, you could ask corsair for another back panel and maybe it could work. Reply
  • Thurwell - Tuesday, October 08, 2013 - link

    Check out the NZXT H630, soundproofed case with lots of radiator support for $149. Kind of ugly though. Reply
  • DanNeely - Tuesday, September 24, 2013 - link

    No empty case or build galleries? Reply
  • MooseMuffin - Tuesday, September 24, 2013 - link

    Is the window really that important to people? Seems like they could solve some of their air cooling woes by throwing a big fan on the side panel like they do with the carbide 500R. Reply
  • Liquid_Static - Tuesday, September 24, 2013 - link

    I hate to say this, but frankly I'm getting bored with Corsair's cases. Don't get me wrong I love their products, but their cases have been just more of the same. Reply

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