A huge thanks goes out to AnandTech reader Andrei and some very attentive Xtreme Systems forum members. I just got an email pointing me to this thread where one particular number from our OCZ Vertex 3 and Intel SSD 510 articles was called into question. The problem? The 4KB random read numbers for the Vertex 3 were supiciously high. The reality? They were incorrect. 

I was just alerted to the error and quickly powered up the SSD testbed to recreate the test. It looks like the original numbers were either run at a queue depth of 32 or accidentally copied from one of the runs of 4KB random write tests. Either way the number was incorrect and has been fixed in all affected articles.

The updated numbers don't change our conclusions. The Vertex 3 is still the fastest next-generation SSD we've tested thus far and it still maintains a random read performance advantage over the Intel SSD 510.

The integrity of our test data is something we all take very seriously here. Errors like these do you a disservice and hurt the reputation I've worked so hard over the past 14 years to build. I do hope this oversight hasn't negatively impacted your opinion of AnandTech - we aren't perfect, but we strive to be. I do apologize to all of you for the error and I will be restructuring how I run and record my Iometer tests to avoid this particular issue from cropping up again. 

My sincere thanks goes out to Andrei and the XS folks who helped track down the error and inform us of its existence.

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  • Alkapwn - Wednesday, March 02, 2011 - link

    I, for one, am a faithful Anandite exactly because you and the Anandtech team take your reputations seriously, constantly post excellent articles and investigations, and do top notch work.

    Thanks for the clarifications.

    = )
    Reply
  • enderwiggin21 - Wednesday, March 02, 2011 - link

    +1 Reply
  • vol7ron - Wednesday, March 02, 2011 - link

    Agreed and it still kicks Intel's ass.

    I'd like to see Intel license the SandForce so it could use it's compression method and apply Intel's wear-leveling method.
    Reply
  • Samus - Thursday, March 03, 2011 - link

    if only politicians were this honest... Reply
  • james.jwb - Thursday, March 03, 2011 - link

    Mistakes happen, it's how they are handled that count, and Anandtech never makes excuses for it's mistakes, just learns from them, so it's all good in my book :) Reply
  • DarkKnight_Y2K - Thursday, March 03, 2011 - link

    +1 Reply
  • marraco - Thursday, March 03, 2011 - link

    I wanted to say the same, so I just agree with Alkapwn.

    Thumbs up for Anandtech.
    Reply
  • angavar - Friday, March 04, 2011 - link

    +1 Reply
  • lurker265 - Tuesday, March 08, 2011 - link

    Can't say it better.
    Everyone makes mistakes. Very few go out of their way to publicly correct them.
    Reply
  • pattycake0147 - Wednesday, March 02, 2011 - link

    It is because of your honesty, hard work, and quality articles that I keep visiting AnandTech. This article just shows that your best characteristic is still in tact. Reply

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