PCMark Vantage - A New Leader

The Vertex 2 Pro’s dominance doesn’t stop in the synthetic tests - we have a new winner in PCMark Vantage.

While I don’t like Vantage much as a CPU benchmark, it is one of the best real world indicators of SSD performance. Far better than a lot of the synthetic tests that are used by most. Performance in Vantage isn’t all that matters, but as a part of a suite it’s very important.

Luckily for OCZ and SandForce, the Vertex 2 Pro doesn’t disappoint here either. As a testament to how much they have their act together, I didn’t have to tell SandForce what their Vantage scores were - they already use it as a part of their internal test suite. This is in stark contrast to other newcomers to the SSD market that were surprised when I told them that their drives don’t perform well in the real world.

The Vertex 2 Pro is 6% faster than the X25-M G2 in the overall PCMark Vantage test and 12% faster in the HDD specific suite. It’s at the borderline for what’s noticeable in the real world for most users but the advantage is there.

PCMark Vantage - Overall Suite

The memories suite includes a test involving importing pictures into Windows Photo Gallery and editing them, a fairly benign task that easily falls into the category of being very influenced by disk performance.


PCMark Vantage - Memories Test

The TV and Movies tests focus on on video transcoding which is mostly CPU bound, but one of the tests involves Windows Media Center which tends to be disk bound.

PCMark Vantage - TV & Movies Test

The gaming tests are very well suited to SSDs since they spend a good portion of their time focusing on reading textures and loading level data. All of the SSDs dominate here, but as you'll see later on in my gaming tests the benefits of an SSD really vary depending on the game. Take these results as a best case scenario of what can happen, not the norm.

PCMark Vantage - Gaming Test

In the Music suite the main test is a multitasking scenario: the test simulates surfing the web in IE7, transcoding an audio file and adding music to Windows Media Player (the most disk intensive portion of the test).

PCMark Vantage - Music Test

The Communications suite is made up of two tests, both involving light multitasking. The first test simulates data encryption/decryption while running message rules in Windows Mail. The second test simulates web surfing (including opening/closing tabs) in IE7, data decryption and running Windows Defender.

PCMark Vantage - Communications Test

I love PCMark's Productivity test; in this test there are four tasks going on at once, searching through Windows contacts, searching through Windows Mail, browsing multiple webpages in IE7 and loading applications. This is as real world of a scenario as you get and it happens to be representative of one of the most frustrating HDD usage models - trying to do multiple things at once. There's nothing more annoying than trying to launch a simple application while you're doing other things in the background and have the load take forever.

PCMark Vantage - Productivity Test

The final PCMark Vantage suite is HDD specific and this is where you'll see the biggest differences between the drives:

PCMark Vantage - HDD Test

Random Performance - Better than Intel AnandTech Storage Bench
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  • Shark321 - Monday, January 25, 2010 - link

    Kingston has released a new SSD series (V+) with the Samsung controller. I hope Anandtech will review it soon. Other sites are not reliable, as they test only sequential read/writes. Reply
  • Bobchang - Wednesday, January 20, 2010 - link

    Great Article!
    it's awesome to have new feature SSD and I like the performance
    but, regarding your test, I don't get the same random read performance from IOMeter.

    Can you let me know what version of IOMeter and configuration you used for the result? I never get more than around 6000 IOPS.
    Reply
  • AnnonymousCoward - Wednesday, January 13, 2010 - link

    Anand,

    Your SSD benchmarking strategy has a big problem: there are zero real-world-applicable comparison data. IOPS and PCMark are stupid. For video cards do you look at IOPS or FLOPS, or do you look at what matters in the real world: framerate?

    As I said in my post here (http://tinyurl.com/yljqxjg)">http://tinyurl.com/yljqxjg), you need to simply measure time. I think this list is an excellent starting point, for what to measure to compare hard drives:

    1. Boot time
    2. Time to launch applications
    _a) Firefox
    _b) Google Earth
    _c) Photoshop
    3. Time to open huge files
    _a) .doc
    _b) .xls
    _c) .pdf
    _d) .psd
    4. Game framerates
    _a) minimum
    _b) average
    5. Time to copy files to & from the drive
    _a) 3000 200kB files
    _b) 200 4MB files
    _c) 1 2GB file
    6. Other application-specific tasks

    What your current strategy lacks is the element of "significance"; is the performance difference between drives significant or insignificant? Does the SandForce cost twice as much as the others and launch applications just 0.2s faster? Let's say I currently don't own an SSD: I would sure like to know that an HDD takes 15s at some task, whereas the Vertex takes 7.1s, the Intel takes 7.0s, and the SF takes 6.9! Then my purchase decision would be entirely based on price! The current benchmarks leave me in the dark regarding this.
    Reply
  • rifleman2 - Thursday, January 14, 2010 - link

    I think the point made is a good one for an additional data point for the decision buying process. Keep all the great benchmarking data in the article and just add a couple of time measurements so, people can get a feel for how the benchmark numbers translate to time waiting in the real world which is what everyone really wants to know at the end of the day.

    Also, Anand did you fill the drive to its full capacity with already compressed data and if not, then what happens to performance and reliability when the drive is filled up with already compressed data. From your report it doesn't appear to have enough spare flash capacity to handle a worse case 1:1 ratio and still get decent performance or a endurance lifetime that is acceptable.
    Reply
  • AnnonymousCoward - Friday, January 15, 2010 - link

    Real world top-level data should be the primary focus and not just "an additional data point".

    This old article could not be a better example:
    http://tinyurl.com/yamfwmg">http://tinyurl.com/yamfwmg

    In IOPS, RAID0 was 20-38% faster! Then the loading *time* comparison had RAID0 giving equal and slightly worse performance! Anand concluded, "Bottom line: RAID-0 arrays will win you just about any benchmark, but they'll deliver virtually nothing more than that for real world desktop performance."
    Reply
  • AnnonymousCoward - Friday, January 15, 2010 - link

    Icing on the cake is this latest Vertex 2 drive, where IOPS don't equal bandwidth.

    It doesn't make sense to not measure time. Otherwise what you get is inaccurate results to real usage, and no grasp of how significant differences are.
    Reply
  • jabberwolf - Friday, August 27, 2010 - link

    The better way to test rather then hopping on your mac and thinking thats the end-all be-all of the world is to throw this drive into a server, vmware or xenserver... and create multiple VD sessions.

    1- see how many you can boot up at the same time and run heavy loads.
    The boot ups will take the most IOPS.

    Sorry but IOPS do matter so very much in the business world.

    For stand alone drives, your read writes will be what your are looking for.
    Reply
  • Wwhat - Wednesday, January 6, 2010 - link

    This is all great, finally a company that realizes the current SSD's are too cheap and have too much capacity and that people have too much money.

    Oh wait..
    Reply
  • Wwhat - Wednesday, January 6, 2010 - link

    Double post was caused by anadtech saying something had gone wrong, prompting me to retry. Reply
  • Wwhat - Wednesday, January 6, 2010 - link

    This is all great, finally a company that realizes the current SSD's are too cheap and have too much capacity and that people have too much money.

    Oh wait..
    Reply

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