Intel Mobile Processors

The mobile sector usually values battery life over top performance, so changes are less dramatic. Updates are once again in red, and you can refer to our last Intel Mobile/Server Roadmap for more information. We have split the mobile charts into two tables, one for the Banias/Dothan processors, which require less battery power and offer better performance at a given clock rate, and a second for mobile processors based off the NetBurst architecture. Intel refers to these as the "mobility" and "transportable" platforms, respectively, and we'll start with the former.


Intel Mobility Socket 479M Lineup
Performance Processors
Processor Code Name Speed Cache FSB Launch Date
Pentium M >= 780 Dothan >= 2.26 GHz 2 MB 533 MHz Q4'05
Pentium M 780 Dothan 2.26 GHz 2 MB 533 MHz Q3'05
Pentium M 770 Dothan 2.13 GHz 2 MB 533 MHz Q1'05
Pentium M 765 Dothan 2.10 GHz 2 MB 400 MHz Q4'04
Pentium M 760 Dothan 2.00 GHz 2 MB 533 MHz Q1'05
Pentium M >= 758 LV Dothan >= 1.50 GHz 2 MB 400 MHz Q4'05
Pentium M 758 LV Dothan 1.50 GHz 2 MB 400 MHz Q1'05
Pentium M 755 Dothan 2.00 GHz 2 MB 400 MHz Already available
Pentium M >= 753 ULV Dothan >= 1.20 GHz 2 MB 400 MHz Q4'05
Pentium M 753 ULV Dothan 1.20 GHz 2 MB 400 MHz Q1'05
Pentium M 750 Dothan 1.86 GHz 2 MB 533 MHz Q1'05
Pentium M 745 Dothan 1.80 GHz 2 MB 400 MHz Already available
Pentium M 740 Dothan 1.73 GHz 2 MB 533 MHz Q1'05
Pentium M 738 LV Dothan 1.40 GHz 2 MB 400 MHz Already available
Pentium M 735 Dothan 1.70 GHz 2 MB 400 MHz Already available
Pentium M 733/J ULV Dothan 1.10 GHz 2 MB 400 MHz Already available
Pentium M 730 Dothan 1.60 GHz 2 MB 533 MHz Q1'05
Pentium M 725 Dothan 1.60 GHz 2 MB 400 MHz Already available
Pentium M 723 ULV Dothan 1.00 GHz 2 MB 400 MHz Already available
Pentium M 715 Dothan 1.50 GHz 2 MB 400 MHz Already available
Pentium M 713 ULV Banias 1.10 GHz 1 MB 400 MHz Already available
Budget Processors
Processor Code Name Speed Cache FSB Launch Date
Celeron M >= 390 Dothan >= 1.70 GHz 1 MB 400 MHz Q4'05
Celeron M 390 Dothan 1.70 GHz 512 KB 400 MHz Q3'05
Celeron M 380 Dothan 1.60 GHz 1 MB 400 MHz Q1'05
Celeron M >= 373 ULV Dothan >= 1.00 GHz 512 KB 400 MHz Q4'05
Celeron M 373 ULV Dothan 1.00 GHz 512 KB 400 MHz Q1'05
Celeron M 370 Dothan 1.50 GHz 1 MB 400 MHz Q1'05
Celeron M 360/J Dothan 1.40 GHz 1 MB 400 MHz Q1'05
Celeron M 353 ULV Dothan 900 MHz 512 KB 400 MHz Q1'05
Celeron M 350/J Dothan 1.30 GHz 1 MB 400 MHz Q1'05
Celeron M 340 Banias 1.50 GHz 512 KB 400 MHz Q1'05
Celeron M 330 Banias 1.40 GHz 512 KB 400 MHz Q1'05
Celeron M 320 Banias 1.30 GHz 512 KB 400 MHz Q1'05

If you were unimpressed by the changes to the desktop roadmap, the mobile front has even less news. For the true mobility processors, the only new additions are the Celeron M 390 and the Pentium M 780. There are also several "greater than or equal to" entries in the latest roadmap. Whether those are uncertain due to manufacturing concerns or due to a lack of competition is up for debate. The Banias and Dothan cores were really designed with a set performance/thermal level in mind, so we do not find as much tweaking for higher performance as we see in the desktop sector. The 2.26 GHz of the Pentium M 780 is going to be very close to the maximum clock speed that the design can reach without a die shrink or a large increase in heat output.


Intel Transportable Socket 478M Lineup
Performance Processors
Processor Speed Cache FSB Launch Date
Mobile P4 558 3.60 GHz 1 MB 533 MHz Cancelled
Mobile P4 552 3.46 GHz 1 MB 533 MHz Q1'05
Mobile P4 548 3.33 GHz 1 MB 533 MHz Already available
Mobile P4 538 3.20 GHz 1 MB 533 MHz Already available
Mobile P4 532 3.06 GHz 1 MB 533 MHz Already available
Mobile P4 518 2.80 GHz 1 MB 533 MHz Already available
Budget Processors
Processor Speed Cache FSB Launch Date
Mobile Celeron D 350 3.20 GHz 256 KB 533 MHz Cancelled
Mobile Celeron D 345 3.06 GHz 256 KB 533 MHz Q4'04
Mobile Celeron D 340 2.93 GHz 256 KB 533 MHz Already available
Mobile Celeron D 335 2.80 GHz 256 KB 533 MHz Already available
Mobile Celeron D 330 2.66 GHz 256 KB 533 MHz Already available
Mobile Celeron D 325 2.53 GHz 256 KB 533 MHz Already available

Taking a look at the "transportable" processors, the only changes are the cancellation of the two fastest - and hottest - processors based off the NetBurst architecture. NetBurst was never really designed for the mobile sector, and most of the laptops that use these chips target the "desktop replacement" (DTR) segment rather than true mobility. The cancellations reflect Intel's acknowledgement of this fact, as well as their confidence in the Pentium M and Celeron M parts. They could have easily shipped these parts, but demand is simply not great enough to warrant it. Not only has Intel cancelled the 558 and 350 parts, but the entire NetBurst mobile line is scheduled to cease production in Q2'05. This is no real loss, as it means future laptops will simply shift to using more appropriate parts.

Index Server and Workstation Processors
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  • RotoSequence - Tuesday, November 23, 2004 - link

    I think I have gotten a hold of the true reason behind the cancellation of the 4 Ghz Pentium 4. For at least now, there are some serious issues resulting after extended use of Pentium 4s that are clocked at 4 Ghz+. I E-mailed an Intel Engineer and asked why they dont use FSB increases instead of higher multipliers (as the Pentium 4s tend to like that). When you drive the processor that hard, there is electron polarization that occurs in the processor. Over the course of a few years, this permanent electron polarization (As a result of the electron density in such a small area) results in an open circuit-and an un-bootable CPU. Evidently, this is the average net effect, and in the Intel Guy's own words, "We would rather sell an underclocked processor than one that will fail in a couple of years." So potentially, there you have it people; the reason behind Intel's (possibly temporary?) reason for the cancellation of the Pentium 4 4Ghz. Reply
  • JarredWalton - Saturday, November 6, 2004 - link

    #20: Personally, I won't be surprised to see the dual-core "x" chips slip into Q4 or possibly even '06. Actually, Intel will probably ship limited samples in Q3'05, which may allow them to claim that they have "shipped". Yonah/Jonah is not yet on the roadmaps, which is what this article is about. See Kristopher's recent look at code names, chipsets, and features for an overview of other stuff coming down the pipe from Intel. Reply
  • knitecrow - Thursday, November 4, 2004 - link

    Does anyone seriously expect intel to keep the q3 2005 timeline for x** chips?

    Do they even have working engineering samples?

    ---
    why isn't there anything said about dual-cored pentium M chips?

    I guess we won't seem then untill 2006
    Reply
  • JarredWalton - Thursday, November 4, 2004 - link

    Oops.... my bad. I thought that the 5xxJ actually included EDB as well as EIST, but on closer inspection this is not the case. Urg... So I removed it from the 5xx chips. A new inspection of the roadmap reveals that EIST is apparently enabled on all "Prescott" core Xeons (really Nocona, Cranford and Potomac), and any 775-LGA chips with EM64T also have it. So for now that means the 5xx series is without speedstep. The x.xxF revision Xeons are the same as the 5xxJ revision Prescotts, but EIST and EM64T are not enables for the desktop parts (yet?). Reply
  • jarthel - Wednesday, November 3, 2004 - link

    A member of an Australian computer forums mentioned that the Intel channel roadmap does not mentioned EIST in the J CPUs.

    Also this publicly available page (http://www.intel.com/products/processor_number/inf... does not discuss EIST with J CPUs.

    Can you clarify?
    Reply
  • JarredWalton - Saturday, October 30, 2004 - link

    For official 1066 FSB support, you will need the 925XE chipset, which is not yet available. EM64T support should still work in older chipsets - a BIOS update might be required, however.

    As for EIST and unlocked lower multipliers, I read something somewhere (yeah, I know - highly specific information) about some mod that could be done to unlock lower multipliers on new P4 chips. I don't even recall if it was a software mod or a hardware mod, or maybe just something that needed to be enabled in the BIOS. If I find out more information, I'll let you know, but for now that's about as specific as I can get. :|
    Reply
  • danidentity - Saturday, October 30, 2004 - link

    Thanks Jarrad...about my question in post 8, the 5xxJ CPUs include EIST. Does that mean they'll have unlocked downward multipliers like Athlon 64's? Reply
  • Foxbat121 - Friday, October 29, 2004 - link

    Current Intel chipset (915 and 925) does not support 1066 FSB, IIRC. Reply
  • MIDIman - Friday, October 29, 2004 - link

    Is it safe to say that everything here will be compatible with current LGA775-based chipsets and motherboards, including 1066mhz FSB?

    Does 925x and 915p support EM64T and dual-core CPUs?

    Just curious if its too early to buy into LGA775.
    Reply
  • JarredWalton - Friday, October 29, 2004 - link

    Pumpkin (happy halloween!): The roadmap I have has no mention of any new socket 478 parts other than a Celeron D 345. There have been rumors on and off that Intel may introduce a faster socket 478 part, but to my knowledge Intel has said nothing official about this.

    Danidentity (no relation to Bourne?): "Q1" is as specific as the roadmap gets in relation to the 6xx series right now. Typically, Intel will narrow that down to an actual month (and day even) a couple months prior to launch. We'll update the roadmaps with this information when we get it. I'll take the middle ground right now and guess at February - that way I can't be more than 30 days off. :)
    Reply

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