CPU Performance, Short Form

For our motherboard reviews, we use our short form testing method. These tests usually focus on if a motherboard is using MultiCore Turbo (the feature used to have maximum turbo on at all times, giving a frequency advantage), or if there are slight gains to be had from tweaking the firmware. We put the memory settings at the CPU manufacturers suggested frequency, making it very easy to see which motherboards have MCT enabled by default.

For TRX40 we are running using Windows 10 64-bit with the 1909 update as per our Ryzen Threadripper 3960X and 3970X CPU review.

Rendering - Blender 2.7b: 3D Creation Suite - link

A high profile rendering tool, Blender is open-source allowing for massive amounts of configurability, and is used by a number of high-profile animation studios worldwide. The organization recently released a Blender benchmark package, a couple of weeks after we had narrowed our Blender test for our new suite, however their test can take over an hour. For our results, we run one of the sub-tests in that suite through the command line - a standard ‘bmw27’ scene in CPU only mode, and measure the time to complete the render.

Rendering: Blender 2.79b

Streaming and Archival Video Transcoding - Handbrake 1.1.0

A popular open source tool, Handbrake is the anything-to-anything video conversion software that a number of people use as a reference point. The danger is always on version numbers and optimization, for example the latest versions of the software can take advantage of AVX-512 and OpenCL to accelerate certain types of transcoding and algorithms. The version we use here is a pure CPU play, with common transcoding variations.

We have split Handbrake up into several tests, using a Logitech C920 1080p60 native webcam recording (essentially a streamer recording), and convert them into two types of streaming formats and one for archival. The output settings used are:

  • 720p60 at 6000 kbps constant bit rate, fast setting, high profile
  • 1080p60 at 3500 kbps constant bit rate, faster setting, main profile
  • 1080p60 HEVC at 3500 kbps variable bit rate, fast setting, main profile

Handbrake 1.1.0 - 720p60 x264 6000 kbps FastHandbrake 1.1.0 - 1080p60 x264 3500 kbps FasterHandbrake 1.1.0 - 1080p60 HEVC 3500 kbps Fast

Rendering – POV-Ray 3.7.1: Ray Tracing - link

The Persistence of Vision Ray Tracer, or POV-Ray, is a freeware package for as the name suggests, ray tracing. It is a pure renderer, rather than modeling software, but the latest beta version contains a handy benchmark for stressing all processing threads on a platform. We have been using this test in motherboard reviews to test memory stability at various CPU speeds to good effect – if it passes the test, the IMC in the CPU is stable for a given CPU speed. As a CPU test, it runs for approximately 1-2 minutes on high-end platforms.

Rendering: POV-Ray 3.7.1 Benchmark

Compression – WinRAR 5.60b3: link

Our WinRAR test from 2013 is updated to the latest version of WinRAR at the start of 2014. We compress a set of 2867 files across 320 folders totaling 1.52 GB in size – 95% of these files are small typical website files, and the rest (90% of the size) are small 30-second 720p videos.

Encoding: WinRAR 5.60b3

Synthetic – 7-Zip v1805: link

Out of our compression/decompression tool tests, 7-zip is the most requested and comes with a built-in benchmark. For our test suite, we’ve pulled the latest version of the software and we run the benchmark from the command line, reporting the compression, decompression, and a combined score.

It is noted in this benchmark that the latest multi-die processors have very bi-modal performance between compression and decompression, performing well in one and badly in the other. There are also discussions around how the Windows Scheduler is implementing every thread. As we get more results, it will be interesting to see how this plays out.

Encoding: 7-Zip 1805 Compression

Point Calculations – 3D Movement Algorithm Test: link

3DPM is a self-penned benchmark, taking basic 3D movement algorithms used in Brownian Motion simulations and testing them for speed. High floating point performance, MHz, and IPC win in the single thread version, whereas the multithread version has to handle the threads and loves more cores. For a brief explanation of the platform agnostic coding behind this benchmark, see my forum post here.

System: 3D Particle Movement v2.1

Neuron Simulation - DigiCortex v1.20: link

The newest benchmark in our suite is DigiCortex, a simulation of biologically plausible neural network circuits, and simulates activity of neurons and synapses. DigiCortex relies heavily on a mix of DRAM speed and computational throughput, indicating that systems which apply memory profiles properly should benefit and those that play fast and loose with overclocking settings might get some extra speed up. Results are taken during the steady-state period in a 32k neuron simulation and represented as a function of the ability to simulate in real time (1.000x equals real-time).

System: DigiCortex 1.20 (32k Neuron, 1.8B Synapse)

System Performance Gaming Performance
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  • mark625 - Monday, December 23, 2019 - link

    "The ASUS ROG Zenith II Extreme is the predecessor of the previous generation of X399"

    Shouldn't it be the successor, and not the predecessor? Unless it also has a flux capacitor in there somewhere....
    Reply
  • The_Assimilator - Tuesday, December 24, 2019 - link

    It should be, but AnandTech should also do basic proofreading, and we know how that goes. Reply
  • Korguz - Tuesday, December 24, 2019 - link

    then feel free to go some where else if it bothers you that much. Reply
  • flyingpants265 - Monday, January 6, 2020 - link

    I guess we should never, ever, ever complain about anything, then. Reply
  • tech6 - Monday, December 23, 2019 - link

    Why use the "Republic Of Gamers" moniker on something that clearly is not designed for gaming? Reply
  • Xyler94 - Monday, December 23, 2019 - link

    ROG typically is for Asus's top end consumer products. Yes, I agree they should probably use something else for these super CPUs, but everyone knows Republic of Gamers as being top tier, so Asus... probably to save marketing costs, just use it. Reply
  • Slash3 - Monday, December 23, 2019 - link

    The board also features a full assortment of overclocking options in the BIOS in addition to features such as dual BIOS, on-board power, reset, CMOS clear and safe boot buttons, RGB controls and good VRM cooling and componentry, etc. It's capable of gaming as well as workstation tasks, in keeping with the Threadripper's strange origins as a side project for power users. Reply
  • eek2121 - Monday, December 23, 2019 - link

    People said that about the 1950X as well. Yet I game at 4k60 all day long (when I'm not doing other stuff that I purchased the processor for). Reply
  • zorxd - Monday, December 23, 2019 - link

    it works just fine, but you just don't get as much performance as with a much cheaper CPU with less cores but higher frequency (better performance with 8 or less threads) Reply
  • GreenReaper - Monday, December 23, 2019 - link

    Hoping to benefit from the goodwill associated with the Republic in Star Wars? Reply

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