One of the most active segments of the PC peripherals market is that of mechanical keyboards, with the number of available products and total sales continuously rising over the past several years. As the size of the market constantly expands, ever more companies are making attempts to enter it and claim their own piece of the sales pie. The problem here is that the market is virtually saturated, leaving very little room for innovation, therefore most companies are nowadays trying to compete in terms of aesthetics and/or value.

For today's review we are taking a look at the KM-G3 RGB Mechanical Keyboard from AUKEY. AUKEY is a Chinese-based company that designs and sells all kinds of peripherals, from input devices to car dash cameras. They have very few local distributors around the globe, and instead they prefer to base their business model on direct sales via Amazon.

As for the KM-G3, it's best classified as an entry-level mechanical keyboard. AUKEY has covered all of the basics here, including audible tactile switches, double-shot keycaps, and even RGB lighting. But otherwise, AUKEY has focused on bringing down the price of the keyboard rather than adding more features, so there aren't any advanced features like macro keys or other frills to speak of. The payoff, in turn, is in the low price: the KM-G3 normally retails for $65, and it is often on sale for even less than that.

Packaging and Bundle

The packaging of the KM-G3 is but a brown box with a sketch of the keyboard printed on it. There is no information printed on it, not even the exact model of the keyboard itself. This isn't too surprising considering that AUKEY is focused exclusively on online sales – so they do not have to worry about how well the box can draw the attention of shop browsers. Inside the box, the keyboard is barely protected, with the thin walls of the box being virtually the only layer of shipping protection.

Inside the box we only found a very basic user’s manual, a warranty leaflet, and a plastic keycaps puller. The included documentation is littered with language errors, quite possibly because it was created using a translation software tool rather than a human translator.

The AUKEY KM-G3 RGB Mechanical Keyboard
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  • CU - Wednesday, October 23, 2019 - link

    I would like to see a review of the Redragon K550. It is only $69.99 and has software for programming macros and changing the RGB's. Reply
  • RSAUser - Wednesday, October 23, 2019 - link

    I have two of the K550, I bought it because I have a K556 as my main work keyboard and it's really good.

    The K550 is definitely not, keys are slightly louder than my chery brown and the experience is decidedly not uniform across keys, this across both keyboards.

    I'd spend the extra if I had to choose again, wasn't worth saving about $20 if e.g. My K556 is 4 years old now and has given no usage issues and been a pleasure to type on. Meanwhile the K550 is just Meh.
    Reply
  • Kenshiro70 - Thursday, October 24, 2019 - link

    I have a 552 and love it, though I haven't tested the "hot swappable" switches. I'm a little puzzled by the "budget" claim, particularly since both the Redragon and Qisan's MagicForce lines are both well established, well-reviewed on Amazon, and have been updated over time to reflect user feedback. For example, I've seen non-branded versions of the MagicForce offered on Drop, which are greatly appreciated by people doing custom dipping or paint jobs. Reply
  • drexnx - Saturday, October 26, 2019 - link

    I was going to say why not just get a real Corsair K68 RGB, it has the best software, cherry MX reds, and a spillproof tray for $79.99 but apparently they're up to $119 now!? guess it's pre-black friday price jumps to advertise bigger sales :\ Reply
  • GreenReaper - Wednesday, October 23, 2019 - link

    I don't have a good impression of what the "simplistic onboard programming functions" are actually comprised of. Can you create custom.presets to switch to? How many? Per key, or per zone (and what/how many zones)? Is the macro feature the only other programmable/fn feature? (Not counting the multimedia keys.) Reply
  • kpb321 - Wednesday, October 23, 2019 - link

    I have to say I don't get the conclusion of the review. If the lack of software severely limits the usefulness of the the true RGB backlight then how can it be a good value for what it is. Features you can't really use aren't worth anything. If you want a mechanical keyboard with rainbow backlights and blue switches you can definitely get cheaper keyboards. If you don't care about the color of the backlight sub $20 is pretty common. I'm typing this on one such sub $20 blue switch mechanical keyboards that happens to have red backlighting.

    I've got the following that I took into work. Only 1 in stock but rainbow backlight, OUTEMU blue switches for $20 as just one example I happen to have experience with.
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07MNS9WZG/ref=p...

    For a true RGB keyboard with software to program it I like the following. Brown switches so similar feel to blue switches but without the audible click. The software is a bit rough and may not be the greatest but it exists, works and has your typical features like per key color control and macros along with multiple profiles. It's now my home keyboard so I don't disturb others late at night.

    If anyone still wants this Aukey keyboard it should be $45 after applying code ATKQR9K8 currently.

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07HK9TKKS/?coliid=IQ4W2...
    Reply
  • linuxgeex - Monday, October 28, 2019 - link

    You are lucky if you're allowed to have a blue switch keyboard in a work environment. Either you have your own office, or you have an exceptionally noisy work environment such that your keyboard is not annoying your co-workers more than the ambient noise. Reply
  • mobutu - Wednesday, October 23, 2019 - link

    I hope you'll soon test this one:
    https://www.gskill.com/product/155/314/1554280455/...
    Reply
  • jabber - Thursday, October 24, 2019 - link

    I bought a Aukey mech keyboard (without numberpad) for about £25 on a Amazon special nearly two years ago.

    I have to say it's been rock solid. No RGB (I'm nearly 50) and the keycaps have remained in perfect shape (I have tough fingernails) with no sign of wear on the letters just a slight shine on the right of the spacebar. They make a good value keyboard!
    Reply
  • Delbert91 - Wednesday, November 13, 2019 - link

    I'm a little puzzled by the "budget" claim, particularly since both the Redragon and Qisan's MagicForce lines are both well established, well-reviewed on Amazon, and have been updated over time to reflect user feedback. For example, I've seen non-branded versions of the MagicForce offered on Drop, which are greatly appreciated by people doing custom dipping or paint jobs. https://myfedloan.us/ Reply

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