Corsair on Thursday released its fastest memory kit to date, the Vengeance LPX DDR4-4866, aimed at the most performance-hungry enthusiasts. The modules are specifically tested for compatibility AMD’s Ryzen 3000/X570 platforms, though they can work with Intel-based PCs too.

Corsair’s Vengeance LPX DDR4-4866 memory kit consists of two 8 GB memory modules (CMK16GX4M2Z4866C18) featuring a CL18 26-26-46 latency and a 1.5V voltage. The unbuffered DIMMs rely on Micron’s cherry-picked DRAM devices as well as Corsair’s custom 10-layer PCB. The modules are traditionally equipped with aluminum heat spreaders, and are compatible Corsair’s Vengeance Airflow fan to improve cooling.

The manufacturer claims that it has tested its Vengeance LPX DDR4-4866 modules with AMD’s Ryzen 3000-series processors paired with ASUS's ROG Crosshair VIII Formula, the MSI MEG X570 Godlike, and the MSI Prestige X570 Creating motherboards. Meanwhile, since the UDIMMs feature an XMP 2.0 SPD, they will be able to work with Intel Z390-based platforms at DDR4-4800 as well.

For those who need high-end performance and RGB LEDs as well, Corsair will also offer Vengeance RGB Pro DDR4-4700 16 GB kit. The RGB Pro kit cannot be equipped with a fan, but it will still feature the same DRAM chips, a custom PCB, an XMP 2.0 profile, and aluminum heat spreaders.

Being a true flagship offering, Corsair’s 16 GB Vengeance LPX DDR4-4866 memory kit is expensive to say the least: in the US the kit costs $984, whereas in Europe it is priced at €1,064,99.

There is one thing to note about Corsair’s Vengeance LPX DDR4-4866 and Vengeance RGB Pro DDR4-4700 memory kits. AMD as well as third-party observers sayd that the Ryzen 3000 processors show the highest memory subsystem performance when frequencies of Infinity Fabric (fClk), memory controller (uClk), and DRAM (mClk) are equal (i.e., the fClk to mClk ratio is set at 1:1). Which can be an issue, as few Ryzen CPUs can support such high fClk clocks; so using exceptionally fast DDR4 memory modules (e.g., DDR4-4000+) may be unfavorable in many cases. That said, it remains to be seen what kind of advantages will Corsair’s DDR4-4700 and DDR4-4866 kits bring.

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Source: Corsair

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  • ballsystemlord - Friday, September 13, 2019 - link

    Spelling mistake:
    "AMD as well as third-party observers sayd that the Ryzen 3000 processors show the highest memory subsystem performance when frequencies..."
    Should be "said", not "sayd".
    "AMD as well as third-party observers said that the Ryzen 3000 processors show the highest memory subsystem performance when frequencies..."

    Thanks for the article.
    Reply
  • PeachNCream - Friday, September 13, 2019 - link

    Timetech sells a 16GB DDR4 kit for $60 on Amazon. About 3 months ago, I bought an 8GB SODIMM for my laptop for $35, also off Amazon. Yes, that memory is all slower, but I suspect that buying this RAM at 16.4 times the price will not reward a desktop PC user with 16.4 times the memory performance or anywhere close to 16.4 times the overall system performance. It'd be generous to estimate an overall 10% performance uplift given otherwise equal components. Reply
  • Hxx - Saturday, September 14, 2019 - link

    yeah I had a suspicion just by reading the title that both of these kits are not value oriented but thanks for confirming. lol Reply
  • PeachNCream - Sunday, September 15, 2019 - link

    I'm genuinely shocked that you needed me to lead you to that conclusion, but I guess there are all sorts on the Internet so you're welcome. Reply
  • Skeptical123 - Tuesday, September 17, 2019 - link

    Lol you again... Honestly can you hear yourself? Reply
  • Oliseo - Sunday, September 15, 2019 - link

    That $3 2lb bag of mince isn't as good as the $50 steak.

    Thanks for clearing that up.
    Reply
  • PeachNCream - Sunday, September 15, 2019 - link

    You seem upset at your life choices. Reply
  • 0razor1 - Friday, September 13, 2019 - link

    I'm really sorry but I disagree with your closing stanza.
    The IF must run 1:1 with RAM. Cool. At 1800-2000 all IF cop-out. So at 3600MHz - 4000 MHz, the RAM is lined up well.

    If going above 4000 MHz on RAM (well some IFs can quit at even 3600 MHz RAM 1:1), one must drop IF:RAM to 1:2 ), and to recover high IF speeds, one must look at >5MHz RAM. \

    A guaranteed 4866 means it'll do well OC'ing in theory. Thus getting the IF clock back up to a point where the increased RAM freq and the improved (over stock) IF freq is *quite* desirable.

    Well, maybe not for games.
    Reply
  • AshlayW - Saturday, September 14, 2019 - link

    I think there is also latency issues incurred with crossing clock domains, even if the clocks are 1:2. Could be wrong, though. Reply
  • Beaver M. - Saturday, September 14, 2019 - link

    Still very happy with my 3200CL14 ones that I bought 2015.
    I just wish I would have bought 32 GB instead of 16, because then I would be able to use them in my next PC too.
    Reply

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