Intel does not often disclose its own chipset names in advance, but from time to time we get glimpses into accidental publication. This week, driver documents from the company show software support for unannounced 400-series and 495 chipsets, which are led to believe will be for future generations of products, following on from the 300-series products.

As it turns out, Intel’s chipset drivers have supported the company’s 400-series and 495 chipsets as of mid-August. Software support may indicate that the launch of Intel’s new platforms is imminent. Meanwhile, we can only guess about their specifications and capabilities.

Another interesting addition to Intel’s family of chipsets is the H310D PCH, found in the same document. Based on its name, we can suspect that this is a yet another version of the entry-level H310, but we have no idea about its peculiarities. The original H310 was built on 14nm, the H310C was built on 22nm, so who knows what the H310D will be.

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Source: Intel (via Twitter/momomo_us)

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  • PeachNCream - Friday, September 06, 2019 - link

    "The original H310 was built on 14nm, the H310C was built on 22nm, so who knows what the H310D will be."

    28-32nm if the trend holds up. Bigger numbers are always better so we clearly need Intel to push forward on plans to get us back to at least 65nm by 2021.
    Reply
  • Smell This - Friday, September 06, 2019 - link

    Please do not smear Intel.

    We all know that 65nm was hot and unreliable.
    Reply
  • Smell This - Friday, September 06, 2019 - link


    ... Not unlike those 10nm+++ chips that are due any day.
    Reply
  • HStewart - Saturday, September 07, 2019 - link

    10nm+++ will likely never see light of day, Intel 7nm will is already in the works. I think we will like see a 10nm++ Reply
  • Qasar - Saturday, September 07, 2019 - link

    how can intels 7nm be in the works when they havent even got 10nm anything, + or other wise working right ?? come one Hstewart, stop trying to put your BS pro intel spin on it when some one mentions anything negative about intel. Reply
  • HStewart - Sunday, September 08, 2019 - link

    Yes Intel had issues with 10nm and it now ln production with LiceLake like new XPS 13 2in1 which is available now

    But Intel also realize that it need updated process and has 7nm process ready for 2020/2021.

    But keep in mind lower nm does not always mean more dense or better. The process is interesting now because legal issues between Global Foundries and TSMC
    Reply
  • Qasar - Sunday, September 08, 2019 - link

    ahhh hstewart, have to defend intel no matter what huh ???

    " had issues with 10nm and it now ln production with LiceLake like new XPS 13 2in1 which is available now " more like still having issues, and is barely in production now, no where near the clocks their 14++++++++++++++++++++++++++++nm process is able to reach, and maxes out at what quad core?? lets call that limited production.

    " But Intel also realize that it need updated process and has 7nm process ready for 2020/2021 " yea right.. 2020/21?? try 2023 or later. either way.. i will believe that, when it actually is in full production, and intel releases products in volume, at the same clock speeds ( or better ) and more then 4 cores.

    id laugh if GoFo, at some point, also named intel in those legal issues some how....
    Reply
  • shabby - Sunday, September 08, 2019 - link

    You are comedic gold HStewart, don't stop 😂 Reply
  • HStewart - Monday, September 09, 2019 - link

    Not really, I only writing the truth here - Intel has 7nm in there pipeline for 2021 and 10nm is shipping. Comedic jokes about 14+++++ days are over with Reply
  • Korguz - Monday, September 09, 2019 - link

    writing the truth ??? yea right.. thats a joke !!!!! your fanatic fanboy truth.. or reality ?? until intel releases 7nm products in volume, giving a date for it, is bs. and 14+++++ jokes.. are not over with. Reply

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