At its pre-IFA press event, Intel confirmed that its new enthusiast-class Core i9-9900KS processor will launch in October. The CPU will be very similar to the Core i9-9900K introduced last year, but will feature a higher all-core Turbo frequency when it has sufficient cooling.

The Intel Core i9-9900KS will feature eight cores with Hyper-Threading running at 4.0 GHz base frequency and boosting all the way to 5.0 GHz on all cores, up 300 MHz from 4.7 GHz in case of the Core i9-9900K. Essentially, the new CPU is just an eight-core Coffee Lake Refresh silicon binned to hit higher clocks when cooling is good enough.

Intel 9th Gen Core 8-Core Desktop CPUs
AnandTech Cores Base
Freq
All-Core Turbo Single
Core Turbo
Freq
IGP DDR4 TDP Price
(1ku)
i9-9900KS 8 / 16 4.0 GHz 5.0 GHz 5.0 GHz UHD 630 2666 ? ?
i9-9900K 8 / 16 3.6 GHz 4.7 GHz 5.0 GHz UHD 630 2666 95 W $488
i9-9900KF 8 / 16 3.6 GHz 4.7 GHz 5.0 GHz - 2666 95 W $488
i7-9700K 8 / 8 3.6 GHz 4.6 GHz 4.9 GHz UHD 630 2666 95 W $374
i7-9700KF 8 / 8 3.6 GHz 4.6 GHz 4.9 GHz - 2666 95 W $374

Intel first teased the Core i9-9900KS ahead of Computex earlier this year, so the product launch is not a surprise. The important thing is that the CPU will finally hit the market this October.

In a bid to maintain an intrigue, Intel did not disclose TDP of its new product. Besides, the company also did not disclose launch price of its Core i9-9900KS and we are curious to find out how much will the chipmaker want from its new range-topping enthusiast part.

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Source: Tom’s Hardware

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  • Santoval - Wednesday, September 04, 2019 - link

    "In a bid to maintain an intrigue, Intel did not disclose TDP of its new product."
    Its TDP will only depend on the +400 MHz base frequency anyway, so assuming a fine binning it will probably be around 125W to 140W. However, the all-core full boost clock "TDP" must be in the 250W to 300W range, even with the best possible binning.
    Reply
  • Irata - Thursday, September 05, 2019 - link

    I am also curious what the "sufficient cooling" would be. Probably not a commercial chiller this time around but I wonder if it will be able to sustain these speeds for a meaningful time (or even reach them at all) on air.

    Also curious which mainboards will support it considering that the max power draw will probably be on the high side.
    Reply
  • Opencg - Thursday, September 05, 2019 - link

    The big question is what voltage do they hit 5ghz stable at? Most 9900k can hit 5ghz if you are willing to potentially turn the voltage as high as 1.36v. I run my 9900k at 4.8ghz -2avx and 4.5uncore at 1.27v. If the KS needs too much voltage then it isn't worth it imo. Reply
  • Maxiking - Thursday, September 26, 2019 - link

    Once you have enough money to buy any Intel K cpu, you won't make such stupid statements. Reply
  • Maxiking - Thursday, September 26, 2019 - link

    My 9900k @5.1ghz 1.34v consumes 170w in Prime95 small fft non avx, and 220w with -1 AVX offset in the same test. Reply
  • imaheadcase - Wednesday, September 04, 2019 - link

    TDP really doesn't matter when you buying these CPU anyway.
    What i find silly is that the KF and non-KF version cost the same price. If they priced the non KF cheaper because no graphics be a much better deal for people.

    Not like it matters, every 9900K and KF are selling out of stock for months now.
    Reply
  • Dragonstongue - Wednesday, September 04, 2019 - link

    TDP matters, likely always will, however, when the manufacturer does NOT stick to even their own TDP (or give high hell to ODM that go above and beyond spec) then if does not

    LMAO....I guess as well not really matter if your "box cooler" can barely handle 45-65w range.

    IMO truth in numbers, if it CAN hit 220w power/TDP put on the box electrically milted to never exceed X.....they do not do this, really about the closest ever was, has always been AMD, when say TDP x or BOARD POWER x, they are very much in that range (or substantially below this prior to overclock to hell and back .. still using my 7870 rated for 180w, LOOOOOL...most I ever got was 170w and I was anything but stable (overclock like crazy)

    Other notable was ofc Nv 1xxx generation, quite good power for performance given (even if a good chunk of it was psuedo performance i.e BS tricks to appear as quick as did/does/still do, their business is built on it...

    That being said, if Intel does this, they not cook themselves constantly has performance to back up core/thread count AND hardened security (fix all the nasty crud they have allowed at silicon level for decades really) then it might be ok, provided they also not use toothpaste thermal glue nor slap big nasty price tag on (like it is anyone but INTEL FAULT that they royally screwed the pooch for years....all chasing a nm class that has eluded them big time...now we have kind of 10nm that will kind of be more pricey than by all rights should be.

    ^.^
    Reply
  • Slaps - Wednesday, September 04, 2019 - link

    Let me guess, 5GHz meaning 500 USD? Reply
  • Targon - Wednesday, September 04, 2019 - link

    The normal 9900k has a price of $488, so this cherry picked version has to be at least $588 if not $688. Reply
  • Alistair - Wednesday, September 04, 2019 - link

    They have to reduce prices, since the 3700X is only $330 and about the same. 10 percent faster isn't worth double the price. Reply

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