During Computex 2019, SteelSeries announced two new keyboards with a new switch type and a newly designed switch concept. Both the SteelSeries Apex Pro and Apex Pro TKL feature its new mechanical switch with a fully adjustable actuation point which it is calling OmniPoint.


SteelSeries Apex Pro 

The new SteelSeries OmniPoint switches are designed to allow gamers to set the actuation point of the switch giving them full control over the switch. Using magnetic sensors, the keys can be adjusted to the exact user preference. This means that both the Apex Pro and the smaller Apex Pro TKL can be adjusted for gaming, or set for productivity tasks such as word processing. With the magnetic sensors, it Steelseries promises that the OmniPoint switches are faster in response time than conventional switches. Users can set the OmniPoint switches to an actuation point of between 0.4 mm for super fast response in fast-paced games and 3.6 mm for more general users. Both models include RGB LED lighting and are constructed from an aluminum frame.

SteelSeries Apex Pro TKL

Also featured on the SteelSeries Apex Pro and Apex Pro TKL is an OLED smart display. This allows users to receive instant notifications in games such as CS: GO and DOTA 2, as well as applications such as Spotify, and Discord. Users can customize the screen within the bundled SteelSeries Engine software, but this isn't a requirement for users to adjust the actuation point on the OmniPoint switches.

The SteelSeries Apex Pro will be available for an MSRP of $200, with the smaller Apex Pro TKL retailing for around $180. Both models will launch on June 11th in the USA, while the European and Asian markets aren't expected to see them launch until the fall. 

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Source: SteelSeries

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  • MamiyaOtaru - Thursday, May 30, 2019 - link

    adjustable actuation point and a sensor that can tell when you reach it (wherever it may be) makes me wonder why they don't do something with analog input. Reply
  • qlum - Friday, May 31, 2019 - link

    From what I know they decided not to do it because it wouldn't be usefull. In other words they didn't want to invest the reasorses building the software to emulate a controller and deal with it working somewhat inconsistently between games. Reply
  • scheherazade - Saturday, June 01, 2019 - link

    You are looking for the "wooting" keyboard. Full analog keys. NKRO, adjustable key press depth, analog input. And at a similar price to this. https://wooting.io/ Reply
  • Diji1 - Sunday, June 02, 2019 - link

    As a Wooting One owner I can tell you that it's a very high quality product which includes a 0ms actuation mode if you want it.

    Also all switches are replaceable with four different variants should you wish.
    Reply
  • Lord of the Bored - Friday, May 31, 2019 - link

    When we're calling magnetic field sensors "mechanical switches", you can tell marketing has completely lost their dictionary.
    This is less mechanical than a silicone rubber dome is.
    Reply
  • croc - Friday, May 31, 2019 - link

    Using hall effect for the switch will be far more accurate and longer lasting than a mechanical switch ever thought of being. However, there is something that typists rely on even more... Touch. How is that kind of tactile response going to be given? I think that I will wait for a few reviews before I give up my mechanical switches. Reply
  • Lord of the Bored - Sunday, June 02, 2019 - link

    There's not a lot of tactile sensation to most keyboards, honestly. As gross as silicone rubber domes feel, they at least cushion the bottoming-out.
    Virtually everyone is using a Cherry MX or clone thereof for their microswitched keyboards, and the only versions of the switch with any meaningful tactility accomplish it with a spring-loaded striker that kicks back. Compared to a red or brown... Hall effect can't actually offer LESS tactility.
    Reply

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