Power, Temperature, and Noise

As always, we'll take a look at power, temperature, and noise of the GTX 1650, though the 'mini' design shouldn't hold any surprises.

GeForce Video Card Average Clockspeeds
Game GTX 1650 ZOTAC
GTX 1650 OC Gaming
Boost Clock 1665MHz 1695MHz
Battlefield 1 1855MHz 1880MHz
Far Cry 5 1847MHz 1886MHz
Ashes: Escalation 1826MHz 1829MHz
Wolfenstein II 1860MHz 1905MHz
Final Fantasy XV 1867MHz 1837MHz
GTA V 1886MHz 1905MHz
Shadow of War 1857MHz 1863MHz
F1 2018 1855MHz 1875MHz
Total War: Warhammer II 1865MHz 1902MHz
FurMark 1629MHz 1672MHz

Power Consumption

Idle Power ConsumptionLoad Power Consumption - Battlefield 1

Load Power Consumption - FurMark

As for idle power consumption, the GTX 1650 falls in line with everything else, with total system power consumption reaching 83W. With contemporary desktop cards, idle power has reached the point where nothing short of low-level testing can expose what these cards are drawing.

Meanwhile at full load, the power consumption disparity between the RX 570 and GTX 1650 is one of the key factors in a direct comparison. Better – but not always – performance can be had for an additional ~75W at the wall, which maps well to the 150W TBP of the RX 570 over the 75W slot-power-only GTX 1650. Though the greater cooling requirements for a higher power card does means forgoing the small form factor.

Temperature

Idle GPU Temperature

Load GPU Temperature - Battlefield 1

Load GPU Temperature - FurMark

Temperatures all appear fairly normal, as the GTX 1650 stays very cool under load.

Noise

Idle Noise Levels

Load Noise Levels - Battlefield 1

Load Noise Levels - FurMark

While the GTX 1650 may have good power and temperature characteristics, the noise is not as clean, if only because entry-level cards don't come with 0db fan idling technology, and SFF cards often have to deal with small shrill fans at relatively high RPM. The GTX 1650's fan isn't the worst, but it's not a standout best either. If anything, it looks to be the result of preferring cooling over acoustics, given the very low load temperatures.

Compute & Synthetics Closing Thoughts
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  • Marlin1975 - Friday, May 3, 2019 - link

    Not a bad card, but it is a bad price. Reply
  • drexnx - Friday, May 3, 2019 - link

    yep, but if you look at the die size, you can see that they're kinda stuck - huge generational die size increase vs GP107, and even RX570/580 are only 232mm2 compared to 200mm2.

    I can see how AMD can happily sell 570s for the same price since that design has been long paid for vs. Turing and the MFG costs shouldn't be much higher
    Reply
  • Karmena - Tuesday, May 7, 2019 - link

    Check the prices of RX570, they cost 120$ on newegg. And you can get one under 150$ Reply
  • tarqsharq - Tuesday, May 7, 2019 - link

    And the RX570's come with The Division 2 and World War Z right now.

    You can get the ASrock version with 8GB VRAM for only $139!
    Reply
  • 0ldman79 - Sunday, May 19, 2019 - link

    Problem is on an OEM box you'll have to upgrade the PSU as well.

    Dealing with normies for customers, the good ones will understand, but most of them wouldn't have bought a crappy OEM box in the first place. Most normies will buy the 1650 alone.

    AMD needs 570ish performance without the need for auxiliary power.
    Reply
  • Yojimbo - Friday, May 3, 2019 - link

    Depending on the amount of gaming done, it probably saves over 50 dollars in electricity costs over a 2 year period compared to the RX 570. Of course the 570 is a bit faster on average. Reply
  • JoeyJoJo123 - Friday, May 3, 2019 - link

    Nobody in their right mind that's specifically on the market for an aftermarket GPU (a buying decision that comes about BECAUSE they're dissatisfied with the current framerate or performance of their existing, or lack of, a GPU) is making their primary purchasing decision on power savings alone. In other words, people aren't saying "Man, my ForkNight performance is good, but my power bills are too high! In order to remedy the exorbitant cost of my power bill, I'm going to go out and purchase a $150 GPU (which is more than 1 month of my power bill alone), even if it offers the same performance of my current GPU, just to save money on my power bill!"

    Someone might make that their primary purchasing decision for a power supply, because outside of being able to supply a given wattage for the system, the only thing that matters is its efficiency, and yes, over the long term higher efficiency PSUs are better built, last longer, and provide a justifiable hidden cost savings.

    Lower power for the same performance at a similar enough price can be a tie-breaker between two competing options, but that's not the case here for the 1650. It has essentially outpriced itself from competing viably in the lower budget GPU market.
    Reply
  • Yojimbo - Friday, May 3, 2019 - link

    I don't know what you consider being in a right mind is, but anyone making a cost sensitive buying decision that is not considering total cost of ownership is not making his decision correctly. The electricity is not free unless one has some special arrangement. It will be paid for and it will reduce one's wealth and ability to make other purchases. Reply
  • logamaniac - Friday, May 3, 2019 - link

    So I assume you measure the efficiency of the AC unit in your car and how it relates to your gas mileage over duration of ownership as well? since you're so worried about every calculation in making that buying decision? Reply
  • serpretetsky - Friday, May 3, 2019 - link

    It doesn't really change the argument if he does or does not take into account his AC unit in his car. Electricity is not free. You can ignore the price of electricity if you want, but your decision to ignore it or not does not change the total cost of ownership. (I'm not defending the electricity calculations above, I haven't verified them) Reply

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