Compute Performance

Shifting gears, we'll look at the compute aspects of the Radeon VII. Though it is fundamentally similar to first generation Vega, there has been an emphasis on improved compute for Vega 20, and we may see it here.

Beginning with CompuBench 2.0, the latest iteration of Kishonti's GPU compute benchmark suite offers a wide array of different practical compute workloads, and we’ve decided to focus on level set segmentation, optical flow modeling, and N-Body physics simulations.

Compute: CompuBench 2.0 - Level Set Segmentation 256

Compute: CompuBench 2.0 - N-Body Simulation 1024K

Compute: CompuBench 2.0 - Optical Flow

Moving on, we'll also look at single precision floating point performance with FAHBench, the official Folding @ Home benchmark. Folding @ Home is the popular Stanford-backed research and distributed computing initiative that has work distributed to millions of volunteer computers over the internet, each of which is responsible for a tiny slice of a protein folding simulation. FAHBench can test both single precision and double precision floating point performance, with single precision being the most useful metric for most consumer cards due to their low double precision performance.

Compute: Folding @ Home (Single and Double Precision)

Next is Geekbench 4's GPU compute suite. A multi-faceted test suite, Geekbench 4 runs seven different GPU sub-tests, ranging from face detection to FFTs, and then averages out their scores via their geometric mean. As a result Geekbench 4 isn't testing any one workload, but rather is an average of many different basic workloads.

Compute: Geekbench 4 - GPU Compute - Total Score

Lastly, we have SiSoftware Sandra, with general compute benchmarks at different precisions.

Compute: SiSoftware Sandra 2018 - GP Processing (OpenCL)

Compute: SiSoftware Sandra 2018 - GP Processing (DX11)

Compute: SiSoftware Sandra 2018 - Pixel Shader Compute (DX11)

 

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  • i4mt3hwin - Thursday, February 07, 2019 - link

    So FP64 is 1:4 and not 1:8 or 1:2 as previously known? Reply
  • tipoo - Thursday, February 07, 2019 - link

    Yep, looks like they changed the cap in vBIOS based on feedback.

    Which also means they could have uncapped it, but it's still cool that they did that.
    Reply
  • Ganimoth - Thursday, February 07, 2019 - link

    Does that mean it could be potentially unlocked by some bios mod? Reply
  • tipoo - Friday, February 08, 2019 - link

    I hope so! Reply
  • Hul8 - Thursday, February 07, 2019 - link

    I don't think it was ever reported or assumed to be 1/2 - that best possible ratio is only for the pro MI50 part. Early reports said 1/16. Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Thursday, February 07, 2019 - link

    For what it's worth, when we first asked AMD about it back at CES, FP64 performance wasn't among the features they were even throttling/holding back on. So for a time, 1/2 was on the table. Reply
  • GreenReaper - Thursday, February 07, 2019 - link

    So it was *your* fault! ;-p Reply
  • BigMamaInHouse - Thursday, February 07, 2019 - link

    Asrock just posted vBios: is this with the FP 1:4 or newer?
    https://www.asrock.com/Graphics-Card/AMD/Phantom%2...
    Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Thursday, February 07, 2019 - link

    We're not currently aware of any Radeon VII cards shipping with anything other than 1/4 rate FP64. Reply
  • BigMamaInHouse - Friday, February 08, 2019 - link

    So maybe it's new bios with some fixes?
    Did you tried it since all cards are the same reference design?
    Reply

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