Benchmarking Performance: CPU System Tests

Our first set of tests is our general system tests. These set of tests are meant to emulate more about what people usually do on a system, like opening large files or processing small stacks of data. This is a bit different to our office testing, which uses more industry standard benchmarks, and a few of the benchmarks here are relatively new and different.

All of our benchmark results can also be found in our benchmark engine, Bench.

FCAT Processing: link

One of the more interesting workloads that has crossed our desks in recent quarters is FCAT - the tool we use to measure stuttering in gaming due to dropped or runt frames. The FCAT process requires enabling a color-based overlay onto a game, recording the gameplay, and then parsing the video file through the analysis software. The software is mostly single-threaded, however because the video is basically in a raw format, the file size is large and requires moving a lot of data around. For our test, we take a 90-second clip of the Rise of the Tomb Raider benchmark running on a GTX 980 Ti at 1440p, which comes in around 21 GB, and measure the time it takes to process through the visual analysis tool.

System: FCAT Processing ROTR 1440p GTX980Ti Data

FCAT is single threaded, however in this test the full 5.0 GHz did not kick in.

Dolphin Benchmark: link

Many emulators are often bound by single thread CPU performance, and general reports tended to suggest that Haswell provided a significant boost to emulator performance. This benchmark runs a Wii program that ray traces a complex 3D scene inside the Dolphin Wii emulator. Performance on this benchmark is a good proxy of the speed of Dolphin CPU emulation, which is an intensive single core task using most aspects of a CPU. Results are given in minutes, where the Wii itself scores 17.53 minutes.

System: Dolphin 5.0 Render Test

For a test that did have 5.0 GHz kick in, the 8086K takes the record in our Dolphin test.

3D Movement Algorithm Test v2.1: link

This is the latest version of the self-penned 3DPM benchmark. The goal of 3DPM is to simulate semi-optimized scientific algorithms taken directly from my doctorate thesis. Version 2.1 improves over 2.0 by passing the main particle structs by reference rather than by value, and decreasing the amount of double->float->double recasts the compiler was adding in. It affords a ~25% speed-up over v2.0, which means new data.

System: 3D Particle Movement v2.1

On 3DPM, the 8086K shows that the 4.3 GHz all-core is on par with the 8700K.

DigiCortex v1.20: link

Despite being a couple of years old, the DigiCortex software is a pet project for the visualization of neuron and synapse activity in the brain. The software comes with a variety of benchmark modes, and we take the small benchmark which runs a 32k neuron/1.8B synapse simulation. The results on the output are given as a fraction of whether the system can simulate in real-time, so anything above a value of one is suitable for real-time work. The benchmark offers a 'no firing synapse' mode, which in essence detects DRAM and bus speed, however we take the firing mode which adds CPU work with every firing.

System: DigiCortex 1.20 (32k Neuron, 1.8B Synapse)

Despite the faster single core frequency, this DRAM-limited test seems to load up another core and stops the 8086K from reaching 5.0 GHz.

Agisoft Photoscan 1.3.3: link

Photoscan stays in our benchmark suite from the previous version, however now we are running on Windows 10 so features such as Speed Shift on the latest processors come into play. The concept of Photoscan is translating many 2D images into a 3D model - so the more detailed the images, and the more you have, the better the model. The algorithm has four stages, some single threaded and some multi-threaded, along with some cache/memory dependency in there as well. For some of the more variable threaded workload, features such as Speed Shift and XFR will be able to take advantage of CPU stalls or downtime, giving sizeable speedups on newer microarchitectures.

System: Agisoft Photoscan 1.3.3 (Large) Total Time

Agisoft is variable threaded, but the 8086K is still a small stones throw from the 8700K.

Ambient Overclocking and Power Scaling Analysis Benchmarking Performance: CPU Rendering Tests
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  • Marlin1975 - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    You used a "Cooler Master CLC"? Is that what comes with the CPU? If not then this is a awful review. Should use what cooler it comes with. Reply
  • Beany2013 - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    it doesn't come with a cooler, as far as I'm aware. Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    Correct. Reply
  • seamonkey79 - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    Should have run it naked then, what were you thinking? /s Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    I was thinking that getting blocked by content filters for indecency would hurt my business... Reply
  • deathBOB - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    You see indecency, I see a new (and potentially lucrative) take on PC hardware reviews. Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    That was already tried in the 90s. It doesn't work as well as you might think. (RIP PCXL) Reply
  • Alexvrb - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    See that's the problem with content filters... always chafin' me. Reply
  • npz - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    I guess you haven't bought any unlocked Intel cpus before Reply
  • SirMaster - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    Well, you can't say "before". You would have to say more recently. My unlocked 4770K came with a heatsink/fan. Reply

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