iGPU Gaming Performance, Continued

Rise of the Tomb Raider

One of the most comprehensive games in the gaming benchmark suite is Rise of the Tomb Raider (RoTR), developed by Crystal Dynamics, and the sequel to the popular Tomb Raider which was loved for its automated benchmark mode. But don’t let that fool you: the benchmark mode in RoTR is very much different this time around.

Visually, the previous Tomb Raider pushed realism to the limits with features such as TressFX, and the new RoTR goes one stage further when it comes to graphics fidelity. This leads to an interesting set of requirements in hardware: some sections of the game are typically GPU limited, whereas others with a lot of long-range physics can be CPU limited, depending on how the driver can translate the DirectX 12 workload.

(1080p) RoTR-1-Valley, Average Frame Rate

(1080p) RoTR-1-Valley, 99th Percentile

(1080p) RoTR-1-Valley, Time Under 30 FPS

 

(1080p) RoTR-2-Prophets, Average Frame Rate

(1080p) RoTR-2-Prophets, 99th Percentile

(1080p) RoTR-2-Prophets, Time Under 30 FPS

 

(1080p) RoTR-3-Mountain, Average Frame Rate

(1080p) RoTR-3-Mountain, 99th Percentile

(1080p) RoTR-3-Mountain, Time Under 30 FPS

The GT 1030 sweeps the top spot against AMD here, though only by small margins most of the time. The AMD APUs still offer a commanding 2-3x performance jump over Intel's product line, and even more when price is factored into the equation.

Rocket League

Hilariously simple and embodying the elements of pick-up-and-play, Rocket League allows users to jump into a game with other people (or bots) to play football with cars with zero rules. The title is built on Unreal Engine 3, which is somewhat old at this point, but it allows users to run the game on super-low-end systems while still taxing the big ones. Since the release in 2015, it has sold over 5 million copies and seems to be a fixture at LANs and game shows. Users who train get very serious, playing in teams and leagues with very few settings to configure, and everyone is on the same level. Rocket League is quickly becoming one of the favored titles for e-sports tournaments, especially when e-sports contests can be viewed directly from the game interface.

With Rocket League, there is no benchmark mode, so we have to perform a series of automated actions, similar to a racing game having a fixed number of laps. We take the following approach: Using Fraps to record the time taken to show each frame (and the overall frame rates), we use an automation tool to set up a consistent 4v4 bot match on easy, with the system applying a series of inputs throughout the run, such as switching camera angles and driving around.

(1080p) Rocket League, Average Frame Rate

(1080p) Rocket League, 99th Percentile

(1080p) Rocket League, Time Under 30 FPS

As the more eSports oriented title in our testing, Rocket League is less graphically intense than the others, and by being built on DX9, also tends to benefit from a good single thread performance. The GT 1030 wins again here, most noticably in the 99th percentile numbers, but the AMD chips are hitting 30 FPS in that percentile graph, whereas in the last generation they were getting 30 FPS average. That is a reasonable step up in performance, aided both to the graphics and the high-performance x86 cores. It will be interesting to see how the memory speed changes the results here.

iGPU Gaming Performance Benchmarking Performance: CPU System Tests
POST A COMMENT

177 Comments

View All Comments

  • Gideon - Monday, February 12, 2018 - link

    BTW Octane 2.0 is retired for Google (just check their github), and even they endorse using Mozillas Speedometer 2.0 (darn can't find the relevant blog post). Reply
  • Ian Cutress - Monday, February 12, 2018 - link

    I know; in the same way we have legacy benchmarks up, some people like to look at the data.

    Not directed to you in general, but don't worry if 100% of the benchmarks aren't important to you: If there's 40 you care about, and we have 80 that include those 40, don't worry that the other 40 aren't relevant for what you want. I find it surprising how many people want 100% of the tests to be relevant to them, even if it means fewer tests. Optane was easy to script up and a minor addition, just like CB11.5 is. As time marches on, we add more.
    Reply
  • kmmatney - Monday, February 12, 2018 - link

    In this case, a few 720p gaming benchmarks would have been useful, or even 1080p at medium or low settings. Reply
  • III-V - Tuesday, February 13, 2018 - link

    Who uses 720p and is in the market for this? Reply
  • PeachNCream - Tuesday, February 13, 2018 - link

    I'm happy with 1366x768 and I'm seriously considering the 2400G because it looks like it can handle max detail settings at that resolution. I'm not interested in playing at high resolutions, but I do like having all the other non-AA eye candy turned on. Reply
  • atatassault - Tuesday, February 13, 2018 - link

    People who buy sub $100 monitors. Reply
  • WorldWithoutMadness - Tuesday, February 13, 2018 - link

    Just google GDP per capita and you'll find huge market for 720p budget gaming pc. Reply
  • Sarah Terra - Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - link

    Wow, i just came here after not visiting in ages, really sad to see how far this site has fallen.

    Ian Cutress was the worst thing that ever happened to Anandtech.

    At one point AT was the defacto standard for tech news on the web, but now it has simply become irrelevant.

    Unless things change i see AT slowly but surely dying
    Reply
  • mikato - Thursday, February 15, 2018 - link

    Me. My TV is 720p and still kicking after many years. These CPUs would make for a perfect high end HTPC with some solid gaming ability. Awesome. Reply
  • nevcairiel - Tuesday, February 13, 2018 - link

    Some more realistic gaming settings might be nice. Noone is going to play on settings that result in ~20 fps, and the GPU/CPU scaling can tilt quite a bit if you reduce the settings.

    I can see why you might not like it, because it takes the focus away from the GPU a bit and makes comparisons against a dGPU harder (unless you run it on the exact same hardware, which might mean you have to re-run it every time), but this is a combined product, so testing both against other iGPU products would be useful info.
    Reply

Log in

Don't have an account? Sign up now