Benchmarking Performance: CPU Legacy Tests

Our legacy tests represent benchmarks that were once at the height of their time. Some of these are industry standard synthetics, and we have data going back over 10 years. All of the data here has been rerun on Windows 10, and we plan to go back several generations of components to see how performance has evolved.

All of our benchmark results can also be found in our benchmark engine, Bench.

3D Particle Movement v1

3DPM is a self-penned benchmark, taking basic 3D movement algorithms used in Brownian Motion simulations and testing them for speed. High floating point performance, MHz and IPC wins in the single thread version, whereas the multithread version has to handle the threads and loves more cores. This is the original version, written in the style of a typical non-computer science student coding up an algorithm for their theoretical problem, and comes without any non-obvious optimizations not already performed by the compiler, such as false sharing.

Legacy: 3DPM v1 MultiThreaded

Legacy: 3DPM v1 Single Threaded

CineBench 11.5 and 10

Cinebench is a widely known benchmarking tool for measuring performance relative to MAXON's animation software Cinema 4D. Cinebench has been optimized over a decade and focuses on purely CPU horsepower, meaning if there is a discrepancy in pure throughput characteristics, Cinebench is likely to show that discrepancy. Arguably other software doesn't make use of all the tools available, so the real world relevance might purely be academic, but given our large database of data for Cinebench it seems difficult to ignore a small five minute test. We run the modern version 15 in this test, as well as the older 11.5 and 10 due to our back data.

Legacy: CineBench 11.5 MultiThreaded
Legacy: CineBench 11.5 Single Threaded
Legacy: CineBench 10 MultiThreaded
Legacy: CineBench 10 Single Threaded

x264 HD 3.0

Similarly, the x264 HD 3.0 package we use here is also kept for historic regressional data. The latest version is 5.0.1, and encodes a 1080p video clip into a high quality x264 file. Version 3.0 only performs the same test on a 720p file, and in most circumstances the software performance hits its limit on high end processors, but still works well for mainstream and low-end. Also, this version only takes a few minutes, whereas the latest can take over 90 minutes to run.

Legacy: x264 3.0 Pass 1
Legacy: x264 3.0 Pass 2

Benchmarking Performance: CPU Office Tests Power Consumption
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  • Gideon - Monday, February 12, 2018 - link

    BTW Octane 2.0 is retired for Google (just check their github), and even they endorse using Mozillas Speedometer 2.0 (darn can't find the relevant blog post). Reply
  • Ian Cutress - Monday, February 12, 2018 - link

    I know; in the same way we have legacy benchmarks up, some people like to look at the data.

    Not directed to you in general, but don't worry if 100% of the benchmarks aren't important to you: If there's 40 you care about, and we have 80 that include those 40, don't worry that the other 40 aren't relevant for what you want. I find it surprising how many people want 100% of the tests to be relevant to them, even if it means fewer tests. Optane was easy to script up and a minor addition, just like CB11.5 is. As time marches on, we add more.
    Reply
  • kmmatney - Monday, February 12, 2018 - link

    In this case, a few 720p gaming benchmarks would have been useful, or even 1080p at medium or low settings. Reply
  • III-V - Tuesday, February 13, 2018 - link

    Who uses 720p and is in the market for this? Reply
  • PeachNCream - Tuesday, February 13, 2018 - link

    I'm happy with 1366x768 and I'm seriously considering the 2400G because it looks like it can handle max detail settings at that resolution. I'm not interested in playing at high resolutions, but I do like having all the other non-AA eye candy turned on. Reply
  • atatassault - Tuesday, February 13, 2018 - link

    People who buy sub $100 monitors. Reply
  • WorldWithoutMadness - Tuesday, February 13, 2018 - link

    Just google GDP per capita and you'll find huge market for 720p budget gaming pc. Reply
  • Sarah Terra - Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - link

    Wow, i just came here after not visiting in ages, really sad to see how far this site has fallen.

    Ian Cutress was the worst thing that ever happened to Anandtech.

    At one point AT was the defacto standard for tech news on the web, but now it has simply become irrelevant.

    Unless things change i see AT slowly but surely dying
    Reply
  • lmcd - Friday, March 22, 2019 - link

    Wow, I just came to this article after not visiting for ages, really sad to see how the comment section has fallen Reply
  • mikato - Thursday, February 15, 2018 - link

    Me. My TV is 720p and still kicking after many years. These CPUs would make for a perfect high end HTPC with some solid gaming ability. Awesome. Reply

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