Zen Cores and Vega

Ryzen 3 Mobile, Plus More Ryzen Mobile Laptops

The most immediate announcement from AMD is two Ryzen 3 Mobile processors designed to fill out the Mobile stack, and the introduction of Ryzen-based APUs for desktop machines.

At the heart of both of these designs is the combination of AMD’s first-generation Zen cores, specifically four cores in a ‘core complex’, connected to Vega-based graphics integrated into the silicon. The two units are connected via AMD’s Infinity Fabric, designed for high-bandwidth and scale, and a feature that permeates through AMD’s recent product portfolio.

Ryzen Mobile

To date, AMD has already announced two products using this configuration. Both of them are for Ryzen Mobile, specifically the Ryzen 7 2700U and Ryzen 5 2500U, which have already been pre-announced in devices such as the HP Envy x2, the Lenovo Ideapad 720S, and the Acer Swift 3. Only the HP Envy x2 has been launched into the market so far (with mixed reviews due to the OEM design, which draws similar criticisms when equipped with Intel CPUs), with the others to see light in Q1 as well as other OEMs like Dell.

The first announcement is regarding adding more Ryzen Mobile processors to the family to cater for a wider audience. To pair with the Ryzen 7 Mobile and Ryzen 5 Mobile, AMD has two Ryzen 3 Mobile parts which will formally be available on January 9th with expected system availability within Q1.

AMD Ryzen Mobile APUs
  Ryzen 7 2700U
with Vega 10
Ryzen 5 2500U
with Vega 8
Ryzen 3 2300U
with Vega 6
Ryzen 3 2200U
with Vega 3
FX-9800P
(2015)
CPU 4C / 8T
2.2 GHz Base
3.8 GHz Turbo
Zen
14nm
4C / 8T
2.0 GHz Base
3.8 GHz Turbo
Zen
14nm
4C / 4T
2.0 GHz Base
3.4 GHz Turbo
Zen
14nm
2C / 4T
2.5 GHz Base
3.4 GHz Turbo
Zen
14nm
Dual Module
2.7 GHz Base
3.6 GHz Turbo
Excavator
28nm
GPU Vega 10
10 CUs
640 SPs
< 1300 MHz
Vega 8
8 CUs
512 SPs
< 1100 MHz
Vega 6
6 CUs
384 SPs
Vega 3
3 CUs
192 SPs
GCN 1.2
8 CUs
512 SPs
> 758 MHz
TDP 15W 15W 15 W 15 W 15W
DRAM Up to DDR4-2400 DDR4-1866
L2 Cache 512 KB/core 1 MB/module
L3 Cache 1 MB/core 4 MB/core -
PCIe Lanes ? ? ? ? 8 x PCIe 3.0
Die Size 209.78 mm2 250.4 mm2
Transistors 4.95 billion 3.1 billion
Launch October 2017 January 2018 May 2016

The Ryzen 3 2300U is a quad-core processor without simultaneous multithreading, which separates it from the other components. The base frequency of 2.0 GHz, a top turbo of 3.4 GHz, and a total of six compute units in the Vega graphics (this equates to 384 streaming processors). The Ryzen 3 2300U shares the same TDP as the other parts, coming in at 15W, and AMD wants to position this as a high-performance part for eSports capable notebooks, handily beating anything from Intel’s 7th Generation family.

The Ryzen 3 2200U is the only dual core component in AMD’s entire Ryzen product line, although it does have simultaneous multithreading to give it four threads in total. Having two fewer cores to fire up does give it a boost on the base frequency, coming in at 2.5 GHz, but the turbo frequency matches the other Ryzen 3 at 3.4 GHz. The 2200U is certainly the processor bringing up the rear, with only three compute units (192 streaming processors) in total, and helping AMD shift some of the processors that are not binned as aggressively as the higher-performance units.

AMD is promoting these two processors as capable elements of an entry level 15W notebook that can process DirectX 12, offer advanced video features, and be used in aesthetically pleasing designs with a long battery life, including 2-in-1s, ultrathin notebooks, and gaming laptops.

New Devices

Not to be content with just announcing a couple of new Ryzen Mobile processors, AMD was eager to promote new mobile devices that will be using Ryzen Mobile. To accompany the HP Envy x360, the Lenovo Ideapad 720S, and the Acer Swift 3, Q1 will see the launch of a new HP (under embargo until later this week), the Acer Nitro 5 series, and the Dell Inspiron 5000 series.

Acer’s Nitro line of laptops is typically aimed at the gaming crowd. The Nitro 5 dictates a 15.6-inch display, which in this case is a 1920x1080 IPS panel. Acer will use the pre-announced higher-end APUs, the Ryzen 7 2700U and Ryzen 5 2500U, but will also be pairing this with a Radeon RX 560 graphics chip. We were told by AMD that the integrated graphics and discrete graphics will be used in a switching context: for video playback, the lower power integrated graphics is used and the discrete is disabled, however the discrete graphics is fired up for gaming work. For compute, or for games that support multi-adaptor DirectX 12 technologies, both the integrated graphics and the discrete graphics should be available, however this is up to the game/software to implement.

The Dell Inspiron lines are more home/small-medium business-oriented devices, and here Dell is also using the Ryzen 7 2700U and Ryzen 5 2500U processors to offer peak Mobile APU performance. Designed more as a workhorse than for aesthetics, the Inspiron 5000 will offer AMD parts with 15.6-inch and 17-inch displays in a chassis that can support dual HDD/SSD options. The unit also comes with an optional Radeon 530 discrete GPU, which has 384 compute units based on AMD’s older GCN 1.0 architecture. This comes across as very odd, given that even the Ryzen 5 has 512 compute units of the newer Vega architecture. I can only assume that this provides extra displays for very specific customers, though for most it would seem an overly pointless addition.

AMD Tech Day at CES Zen Cores and Vega: Ryzen APUs for AM4
POST A COMMENT

138 Comments

View All Comments

  • Ian Cutress - Sunday, January 07, 2018 - link

    Hey everyone, thanks for coming to read about AMD's roadmaps. I want to go into a lot more detail on what came out of AMD's Tech Day, particularly about APUs, 12nm, 7nm, Vega, new APU pricing, the X470 chipset and so on, but a pretty bad strain of CES flu is doing the rounds and this year I'm an unlucky recipient. It's not completely debilitating, but bad enough for me to lose concentration that I might have to cancel a few meetings at the show tomorrow as a result if I can't string a coherent thought together.

    Rather than post a garbled mess, I want to get around to detailing the news for you all properly, as there's a lot of nuances to go into. We also had an interview with Dr. Lisa Su about AMD in 2018. Stay tuned for updates over the next couple of weeks, as I stay hydrated and call room service for chicken soup!
    Reply
  • Eris_Floralia - Monday, January 08, 2018 - link

    Ian, isn't Ryzen 3 2200U utilizing a new dual core die?

    They did have a dual core die with 3 CUs on their former roadmap.
    Reply
  • Ian Cutress - Monday, January 08, 2018 - link

    AMD has one die design covering the whole of Ryzen Desktop + Threadripper + EPYC, and one die design covering Ryzen Mobile + Ryzen APUs. They're not going to spend a third amount of money on masks for a single low-end dual-core die with a few CUs unless it was going to expand into a new segment of products. Given that AMD has been quite open about its 2018 roadmap today, I doubt that would happen. Reply
  • Eris_Floralia - Monday, January 08, 2018 - link

    Thanks Ian.
    I'm also quite surprised they didn't announce the new die on CES if it will be coming. So it's just harvested dies....
    Reply
  • mczak - Monday, January 08, 2018 - link

    Well there is a 2 core / 3 CUs design on the roadmap - Banded Kestrel. This is however intended for embedded. Although it is rather similar to the Bristol Ridge / Stoney Ridge split, and the latter also showed up in non-embedded markets.
    However, just like Stoney Ridge, Banded Kestrel will be limited to single-channel memory. I always assumed it's going to show up in cheap notebooks/PCs, basically as a Pentium Silver competitor, but of course I could be wrong (in any case, it's not ready yet).
    Reply
  • StevoLincolnite - Monday, January 08, 2018 - link

    Error on the second page in the table...
    "Vega 3
    3 CPUs
    192 SPs"

    Should be:
    "Vega 3
    3 CUs
    192 SPs"
    Reply
  • Krysto - Monday, January 08, 2018 - link

    Next time, supplement 10,000 IU Vitamin D3 a day, months before CES. You can thank me later. Reply
  • Dave Null - Monday, January 08, 2018 - link

    This is actually very good advice.

    Most of us who sit in front of computers all day aren't getting enough vitamin D. Vitamin D plays a major regulatory role in our immune systems. Since realizing I was deficient in vitamin D a few years ago (your doctor can easily test for this), I've been supplementing it, and getting sick far less often as a result.
    Reply
  • npz - Monday, January 08, 2018 - link

    Yep, I used to get sick often, like 3-4 times a year. But since I started supplementing with Vitamin D3 plus sunlight whenever I can, and large doses of probiotics (yogurt ain't enough) and some others like vit C, zinc, copper, elderberry, etc everyday, I never got sick even when everyone around me was. As in literally, not one day with the flu or cold, and without cold/flu vaccines either.

    The last time I was sick, and before my current supplementation, my D3 level was 16 ng/mL and that was despite a multivitamin which had some vit D in it. I made sure to bring it up to 45 ng/mL.

    Scientific info, with full technical research and citations about everything for Vit D:
    https://examine.com/supplements/vitamin-d/
    Reply
  • Alexvrb - Tuesday, January 09, 2018 - link

    Yeah I also have to supplement vitamin D. I get enough of the other stuff from my multi most of the time, although when I feel something coming on, extra vitamin C and zinc helps. Elderberry is also good, as is Echinacea (I prefer it in tea form myself). Garlic too... I toss some in my chicken soup. Reply

Log in

Don't have an account? Sign up now