Benchmarking Performance: CPU Legacy Tests

Our legacy tests represent benchmarks that were once at the height of their time. Some of these are industry standard synthetics, and we have data going back over 10 years. All of the data here has been rerun on Windows 10, and we plan to go back several generations of components to see how performance has evolved.

Legacy: CineBench 11.5 MultiThreadedLegacy: CineBench 11.5 Single ThreadedLegacy: 3DPM v1 MultiThreadedLegacy: 3DPM v1 Single ThreadedLegacy: CineBench 10 MultiThreadedLegacy: CineBench 10 Single ThreadedLegacy: x264 3.0 Pass 1Legacy: x264 3.0 Pass 2

Benchmarking Performance: CPU Office Tests Comparing Skylake-S and Skylake-X/SP Performance Clock-for-Clock
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  • jjj - Monday, June 19, 2017 - link

    The 10 cores die is clearly 320+mm2 not 308mm2. The 308mm figure rounds down the mm based on those GamerNexus pics. From there, you slightly underestimate the size of other 2 die. Reply
  • Sarah Terra - Monday, June 19, 2017 - link

    Fair point but what I take from this review is that you are going to be spending pretty much double the cost or higher of ryzen for a proc that will have a 30% larger power envelope if you want higher performance. Intel is scrambling here, well done AMD. Reply
  • jjj - Monday, June 19, 2017 - link

    With 8 cores and up, thermal is a big issue when you OC Skylake X.. Power also to some extent.
    The 6 cores looks interesting vs the 7700k but not so much vs anything else. CPU+mobo gets you north of 600$ and that's a lot. If it had all the PCIe lanes enabled, there would be that but ,while plenty will buy it, it makes no sense to. And ofc there should be a Coffee Lake 6 cores soon , we'll see how it is priced- in consumer 6 cores with 2 mem chans is fine.
    More than 6 cores are priced way too high and , if you need many cores, you buy for MT not ST so ST clocks are less relevant.

    Intel moving in the same direction as AMD on the cache size front is interesting- larger L2 and smaller L3. Now they have "huge cache and memory latency issues"" just like Ryzen lol.
    W/e, Intel's pricing is still far too high and this platform remains of minimal relevance.
    Reply
  • ddriver - Monday, June 19, 2017 - link

    Funny thou, when Ryzen under-performed in games that was no reason to not publish gaming benches, in fact being the platform's main weakness there was actually emphasis put on that... but when it comes to intel we gotta have special treatment... Let's hear it for objectivity!

    Granted the 7800X finally brings something of relatively decent value, but still no good reason to justify the purchase unless one insists on an intel product, for the brand, for thunderbolt or hypetane support.

    "To play it safe, invest in the Core i9-7900X today."

    Really? With Threadripper incoming in a matter of weeks? For less than 1000$ you will get 16 zen cores. It will definitely beat the 7900X by a decent margin in terms of performance, plus the massive I/O capabilities and also ECC support, which I'd say is vital. That just doesn't sound like a honest recommendation. Not surprising in the least.
    Reply
  • ddriver - Monday, June 19, 2017 - link

    Also, on top of that we have launch prices for Ryzen rather than current prices. Looks like a rather open attempt to diminish AMD's platform value. Reply
  • Ian Cutress - Tuesday, June 20, 2017 - link

    We've always posted manufacturer MSRPs in our CPU charts. There has been no official price drop from AMD; if you're seeing lower, it's being run from the distributor level.

    On the TR issue, we basically haven't tested it and don't know the price. Lots of variables in the air, which is why the words are /if you want to play it safe/. Safe being the key word there.
    Reply
  • ddriver - Tuesday, June 20, 2017 - link

    Dunno Ian, in my book this sounds more like hasty than safe. The safe thing would be to wait out. Even without the incipient TR launch, early adoption is rather unsafe on its own. As it is, it sounds more like an attempt to dupe people into spending their money on intel in the eve of the launch of a superior value and performance product from a direct (and sole) competitor.

    It is true that nothing is still officially known about TR, but based on the ryzen marketing strategy and performance we can make safe and accurate speculations. I expect to see the top TR chip launched at 999$ offering at the very least 30% of performance advantage over the 7900X in a similar or slightly higher thermal budget, of course in workloads that can scale nicely up with the core count.

    Comparing the 7900X to the 1800X, we have ~35% performance advantage for 205% the price and 150% the power usage. Based on that, it is a safe bet that TR is going to shine.
    Reply
  • fanofanand - Monday, June 26, 2017 - link

    Ian is a scientist, the less guessing the better. Give him an opportunity to review TR before giving suggestions. Doesn't that seem fair? Reply
  • t.s - Tuesday, June 20, 2017 - link

    Play it safe? Really?? Please. As if everyone in this world's stupid. Reply
  • Ranger1065 - Wednesday, June 21, 2017 - link

    There has never been a better time to give Intel the middle finger. Reply

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