Load Delta Power Consumption

Power consumption was tested on the system while in a single MSI GTX 770 Lightning GPU configuration with a wall meter connected to the OCZ 1250W power supply. This power supply is Gold rated, and as I am in the UK on a 230-240 V supply, leads to ~75% efficiency under 50W and 90%+ efficiency at 250W, suitable for both idle and multi-GPU loading. This method of power reading allows us to compare the power management of the UEFI and the board to supply components with power under load, and includes typical PSU losses due to efficiency.

We take the power delta difference between idle and load as our tested value, giving an indication of the power increase from the CPU when placed under stress. Unfortuantely we were not in a position to test the power consumption for the two 6-core CPUs due to the timing of testing.

Power Consumption Delta: Idle to AVX

Because not all processors of the same designation leave the Intel fabs with the same stock voltages, there can be a mild variation and the TDP given on each CPU is understandably an absolute stock limit. Due to power supply efficiencies, we get higher results than TDP, but the more interesting results are the comparisons. The 5960X is coming across as more efficient than Sandy Bridge-E and Ivy Bridge-E, including the 130W Ivy Bridge-E Xeon.

Test Setup

Test Setup
Processor Intel Core i7-5820K
Intel Core i7-5930K
Intel Core i7-5960X
6C/12T
6C/12T
8C/16T
3.3 GHz / 3.6 GHz
3.5 GHz / 3.7 GHz
3.0 GHz / 3.5 GHz
Motherboard ASUS X99 Deluxe
ASRock X99 Extreme4
Cooling Corsair H80i
Cooler Master Nepton 140XL
Power Supply OCZ 1250W Gold ZX Series
Corsair AX1200i Platinum PSU
1250W
1200W
80 PLUS Gold
80 PLUS Platinum
Memory Corsair 4x8 GB
G.Skill Ripjaws4
DDR4-2133
DDR4-2133
15-15-15 1.2V
15-15-15 1.2V
Memory Settings JEDEC
Video Cards MSI GTX 770 Lightning 2GB (1150/1202 Boost)
Video Drivers NVIDIA Drivers 337.88
Hard Drive OCZ Vertex 3
Optical Drive LG GH22NS50
Case Open Test Bed
Operating System Windows 7 64-bit SP1
USB 2/3 Testing OCZ Vertex 3 240GB with SATA->USB Adaptor

Many thanks to...

We must thank the following companies for kindly providing hardware for our test bed:

Thank you to OCZ for providing us with PSUs and SSDs.
Thank you to G.Skill for providing us with memory.
Thank you to Corsair for providing us with an AX1200i PSU and a Corsair H80i CLC.
Thank you to MSI for providing us with the NVIDIA GTX 770 Lightning GPUs.
Thank you to Rosewill for providing us with PSUs and RK-9100 keyboards.
Thank you to ASRock for providing us with some IO testing kit.
Thank you to Cooler Master for providing us with Nepton 140XL CLCs and JAS minis.

A quick word to the manufacturers who sent us the extra testing kit for review, including G.Skill’s Ripjaws 4 DDR4-2133 CL15, Corsair for similar modules, and Cooler Master for the Nepton 140XL CLCs. We will be reviewing the DDR4 modules in due course, including Corsair's new extreme DDR4-3200 kit, but we have already tested the Nepton 140XL in a big 14-way CLC roundup. Read about it here.

Intel Haswell-E Overclocking CPU Benchmarks
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  • Ninjawithagun - Tuesday, January 12, 2016 - link

    You can't use the 5820K with an X79 motherboard. Reply
  • dawie1976 - Friday, September 12, 2014 - link

    Yip,same here.I7 4790 @ 8.8 GHz.I am still good Reply
  • myT4U - Friday, March 04, 2016 - link

    Tell us about your system and setup please Reply
  • damianrobertjones - Sunday, March 08, 2015 - link

    Yep 2500k @ 4.8 Ghz. Not really Just found it funny that each new post beat the previous by 100Mhz Reply
  • Stas - Friday, April 10, 2015 - link

    Agreed, doing quite well with 2500k @ 4.8Ghz Reply
  • leminlyme - Tuesday, September 02, 2014 - link

    I don't mean to be a prick, but you're not going to see anything in gaming performance even if intel releases a 32core 200$ 3.0 ghz processor. Because in the end, it's about the developers usage of the processors, and not many game developers want to ostracize the entry level market by making CPU heavy games. Now, when Star Citizen launches, there'll be a bit of a rush for 'better' but not 'best' cpus, and that appears to be virtually the only example worth bringing up in the next forseeable 3years of gaming (atleast so far in the public eye..) All you can do is boost up single core performance to a certain point before there's just no more benefits, upgrading your cpu for gaming is like upgrading your plumbing for pissing. Yeah it still goes through and could see marginal benefits, but you know damn well pissin' ain't shit ;D Reply
  • awakenedmachine - Tuesday, September 02, 2014 - link

    Not prick-like at all, I appreciate the comment. I'm an old dude who hasn't "gamed" for years and I'm just now getting back into it, trying to figure out what will work and for what price. Your insight is very helpful! Sounds like a lot of guys are using OC'ed i5 cores, good to know. Reply
  • swing848 - Thursday, September 04, 2014 - link

    Crank up World of Tanks video settings to maximum and watch your FPS sink like a rock. A high end system is needed to run this title at max settings, that only recently began to use 2 CPU cores and 2 GPUs. No one using a mid-range Intel CPU and upper-midrange single GPU will see 60fps with the video cranked to maximum. Reply
  • Midwayman - Tuesday, September 30, 2014 - link

    That game is just horribly coded. There is no excuse for the amount of CPU and GPU it needs. Reply
  • swing848 - Thursday, September 04, 2014 - link

    Check out my post above regarding MS-FSX.

    And, yes, I have installed Star Citizen some time ago [alpha release FINALLY allowed some play], and my system has done well with it, even in alpha.
    Reply

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