For our discrete GPU benchmarks, we have split them up into the different GPU configurations we have tested. We have access to both MSI GTX 770 Lightning GPUs and ASUS reference HD 7970s, for SLI and Crossfire respectively. These tests are all run at 1080p and maximum settings, reporting the average and minimum frame rates.

dGPU Benchmarks: 1x MSI GTX770 Lightning

F1 2013

F1 2013: 1080p Max, 1x GTX 770

F1 2013: 1080p Max, 1x GTX 770

Using the i3 brings the frame rate down below 120 FPS average, with the minimum FPS up to 20% lower than the i5.

Bioshock Infinite

Bioshock Infinite: 1080p Max, 1x GTX 770

Bioshock Infinite: 1080p Max, 1x GTX 770

With Bioshock on single NVIDIA, it would seem that CPU power matters more in the minimum FPS values.

Tomb Raider

Tomb Raider: 1080p Max, 1x GTX 770

Tomb Raider: 1080p Max, 1x GTX 770

Tomb Raider is infamously CPU-agnostic, showing all CPUs hovering around or below 50 FPS average.

Sleeping Dogs

Sleeping Dogs: 1080p Max, 1x GTX 770

Sleeping Dogs: 1080p Max, 1x GTX 770

Similarly with Sleeping Dogs, it does not take much CPU power to hit peak FPS.

Company of Heroes 2

Company Of Heroes 2: 1080p Max, 1x GTX 770

Company Of Heroes 2: 1080p Max, 1x GTX 770

COH2 takes a strain on most graphics cards, but both average and minimum FPS are roughly the same for all three refresh CPUs.

Battlefield 4

Battlefield 4: 1080p Max, 1x GTX 770

Battlefield 4: 1080p Max, 1x GTX 770

IGP Benchmarks: Synthetic dGPU Benchmarks: 2x MSI GTX770 Lightning
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  • AndrewJacksonZA - Monday, May 12, 2014 - link

    If you didn't clarify "Human limited" and "CPU limited" I would've understood them the other way around:
    "Human limited" has the human being as the slowest part of the system with a very fast CPU.
    "CPU limited" has the CPU as the slowest part of the system.
    Reply
  • Harry Lloyd - Monday, May 12, 2014 - link

    Testing performance of these CPUs is completely pointless. The only interesting thing about them is power consumption and thermals. Reply
  • geok1ng - Monday, May 12, 2014 - link

    The benchmarks of the Xeon 2687 v2 8c/16Ht imply that the upcoming Extrem Edition haswell-E CPU will be a landslide. 5960X can't come soon enough. Reply
  • Antronman - Monday, May 12, 2014 - link

    If the 5960x will be as bad as the 4960x, the 5930k can't come soon enough either. Reply
  • milkMADE - Monday, May 12, 2014 - link

    too bad the only sku with 8-cores to give it that landslide are the EE $1000 5960x Reply
  • geok1ng - Tuesday, May 13, 2014 - link

    a xeon 1680 v2 , single socket 8c/16ht costs $1887, and afetr 6 months we still do not know if it is unlocked like the 6cores 1650/1660. So $1000 for a 5960x is not outlandish Reply
  • Chrispy_ - Monday, May 12, 2014 - link

    Looking at the Z97 vs H97, why are small businesses not allowed to use SRT?
    Such dumb.
    Reply
  • Antronman - Monday, May 12, 2014 - link

    How many fucks I give: 0. Reply
  • StrangerGuy - Monday, May 12, 2014 - link

    Intel can spam a million SKUs left and right while pretending it's relevant like 10 years ago and it still doesn't mask the fact there are only like 2 chips @ $50 and $220 that makes sense for 90% and 9.99% of desktop users respectively, and most of them are well served by chips sold 3 years ago. Reply
  • Antronman - Monday, May 12, 2014 - link

    Actually there are more "sensible" enthusiast chips. For example, if I am running a 4k setup, and I also record gameplay and upload it to youtube, I want something notably better performing than the 4670k. And I would say that much larger .01% of the computer-using community is pro overclockers and video editors and scientists and software developers.

    There's so many niches these days, a much greater percentage of people needing more specific solutions is present than most people think.
    Reply

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