Power Consumption

Low power consumption has always been a staple of Samsung's SSDs, and the EVO is no different. Idle and load power are among the best here. I'm also expanding our DIPM testing, first introduced in the SanDisk Extreme II review:

We're introducing a new part of our power consumption testing with this review: measurement of slumber power with host initiated power management (HIPM) and device initiated power management (DIPM) enabled. It turns out that on Intel desktop platforms, even with HIPM and DIPM enabled, SSDs will never go into their lowest power states. In order to get DIPM working, it seems that you need to be on a mobile chipset platform. I modified an ASUS Zenbook UX32VD to allow me to drive power to the drive bay from an external power supply/power measurement rig. I then made sure HIPM+DIPM were enabled, and measured average power with the drive in an idle state. The results are below:

SSD Slumber Power (HIPM+DIPM)

The EVO is almost as good as the Pro from a slumber power perspective, and significantly better than anything else in the list here.

Drive Power Consumption - Idle

Drive Power Consumption - Sequential Write

Drive Power Consumption - Random Write

AnandTech Storage Bench 2011 Final Words
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  • tincmulc - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - link

    How is rapid any better from SuperCache or FancyCache? Not only do they do the same thing, but can also be configured to use more ram or use os invisble memory (32 bit os with more than 3GB of ram) and they work for any drive, even HDDs. Reply
  • spazoid - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - link

    It's free. Free is better. Reply
  • jhh - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - link

    Are there any latency measurements in milliseconds as opposed to IOPS? With IOPS, the drive may be queuing rquests, making it difficult to translate IOPS to milliseconds per request. Reply
  • Kibbles - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - link

    If I write 1gb/day on average to my SSD, since media files go on my home server, this drive would last me 395 years LOL! Reply
  • sheh - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - link

    Anand, would you consider writing an article on the other aspect of endurance: data retention time? With TLC entering the fray it's starting to get even more worrying.

    It'd be interesting to know how retention time changes throughout a drive's life, trends in the last few years, differences between manufacturers, the effect of the JEDEC standard, whether there's any idle-time refreshing for old written cells, etc.

    And an idea: I'd like to see drives where you can configure whether to use the drive as SLC/MLC/TLC. Switch to SLC for reliability/performance, TLC for capacity.
    Reply
  • MrSpadge - Saturday, July 27, 2013 - link

    "And an idea: I'd like to see drives where you can configure whether to use the drive as SLC/MLC/TLC. Switch to SLC for reliability/performance, TLC for capacity."

    Or a drive which switches blocks from TLC operation to MLC as it runs out of writes cycles. And finally to SLC.. at which point in time it should last pretty much infinitely.
    Reply
  • mgl888 - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - link

    Great article.
    Does RAPID require that you install a separate driver or does it just work automatically out of the box? What's the support like for Linux?
    Reply
  • bobbozzo - Friday, July 26, 2013 - link

    It's a driver, for Windows. Reply
  • TheinsanegamerN - Saturday, July 27, 2013 - link

    and i dont think that rapid has a reason to be on linux. linux is already much better with ssd writes than windows. Reply
  • chizow - Thursday, July 25, 2013 - link

    Minor spelling correction: http://www.anandtech.com/show/7173/samsung-ssd-840...

    "counterfit" should be "counterfeit"
    Reply

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