Quick Sync Performance

The 128MB eDRAM has a substantial impact on QuickSync performance. At a much lower TDP/clock speed, the i7-4950HQ is able to pretty much equal the performance of the i7-4770K. Running Haswell's new better quality transcode mode, the 4950HQ is actually 30% faster than the fastest desktop Haswell. This is just one of many reasons that we need Crystalwell on a K-series socketed desktop part.

CyberLink Media Espresso 6.5 - Harry Potter 8 Transcode

CPU Performance

I spent most of the week wrestling with Iris Pro and gaming comparisons, but I did get a chance to run some comparison numbers between the i7-4950HQ CRB and the 15-inch MacBook Pro with Retina Display running Windows 8 in Boot Camp. In this case the 15-inch rMBP was running a 2.6GHz Core i7-3720QM with 3.6GHz max turbo. Other than the base clock (the i7-4950HQ features a 2.4GHz base clock), the two parts are very comparable as they have the same max turbo frequencies. I paid attention to turbo speeds while running all of the benchmarks and for the most part found the two systems were running at the same frequencies, for the same duration.

To put the results in perspective I threw in i7-3770K vs. i7-4770K results. The theory is that whatever gains the 4770K shows over the 3770K should be mirrored in the i7-4950HQ vs. i7-3720QM comparison. Any situations where the 4950HQ exceeds the 4770K's margin of victory over Ivy Bridge are likely due to the large 128MB L4 cache.

Peak Theoretical GPU Performance
  Cinebench 11.5 (ST) Cinebench 11.5 (MT) POV-Ray 3.7RC7 (ST) POV-Ray 3.7RC7 (MT) 7-Zip Benchmark 7-Zip Benchmark (Small) x264 HD - 1st Pass x264 HD - 2nd Pass
Intel Core i7-4770K 1.78 8.07 - 1541.3 23101 - 79.1 16.5
Intel Core i7-3770K 1.66 7.61 - 1363.6 22810 - 74.8 14.6
Haswell Advantage 7.2% 6.0% - 13.0% 1.3% - 5.7% 13.0%
Intel Core i7-4950HQ 1.61 7.38 271.7 1340.9 21022 14360 73.9 14.0
Intel Core i7-3720QM 1.49 6.39 339.1 1178.3 19749 12670 66.2 12.9
Haswell Advantage 8.1% 15.5% 24.8% 13.8% 6.4% 13.3% 11.6% 8.5%
Crystalwell Advantage 0.9% 9.5% - 0.8% 5.1% - 5.9% -4.5%

I didn't have a ton of time to go hunting for performance gains, but a couple of these numbers looked promising. Intel claims that with the right workload, you could see huge double digit gains. After I get back from Computex I plan on poking around a bit more to see if I can find exactly what those workloads might be.

Compute Performance Pricing
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  • tipoo - Saturday, June 1, 2013 - link

    I really hope so, the Retina Macbook Pro 13" would get a whole lot more appealing with quad core and Iris Pro. Reply
  • DanNeely - Saturday, June 1, 2013 - link

    Probably; easily if anand is right about Apple deciding it's good enough to drop the dGPU. Worst case would be Apple taking advantage of the adjustable TDP options to tune the CPU performance/tdp down a bit. Reply
  • Gaugamela - Saturday, June 1, 2013 - link

    Really impressive!
    This focus of Intel on graphics will force Nvidia and AMD to push dedicated GPUs forward at a much faster pace at the risk of being destroyed by Intel iGPUs. This couldn't come at a better time with the advent of high resolution screens in notebooks and displays (that new 4K Asus monitor).
    AMD will need to bring Kaveri with a monster of a iGPU otherwise Intel just nullified the only area where they had any type of advantage.
    Reply
  • Blibbax - Saturday, June 1, 2013 - link

    I question how much more can be had from APU graphics with the bandwidth restrictions of 64-bit DDR3. Reply
  • silverblue - Saturday, June 1, 2013 - link

    Iris Pro is exceptionally good, however you have to ask how much faster the 7660D would be with the same memory bandwidth advantage. Additionally, Trinity is hardly going to be in the same sort of systems, and as the GPU is being held back by the CPU part anyway, it does take a little shine off Iris Pro's astounding performance. Even so, well done Intel, on both the hardware and software fronts. Reply
  • trulyuncouth1 - Saturday, June 1, 2013 - link

    I think its kind of a moot point, Selling something this expensive will not affect AMD or even Nvidia that much. You can get an entire AMD APU based notebook for the cost of just this processor. I love the idea of this being pushed forward but unless Intel can bring it to a lower price point its kind of pointless. Reply
  • ilkhan - Saturday, June 1, 2013 - link

    Im probably unique in that I want a quad haswell with the 20EU graphics and a GTX760m dGPU from a latitude (dock!) E6540. Wonder if thats going to happen. Probably not.

    Still, this looks damn good for Intel and will only improve over time.
    Reply
  • lmcd - Sunday, June 2, 2013 - link

    Howabout, rather, a 760 dGPU from a latitude dock? A bit more appealing :-) Reply
  • Zandros - Saturday, June 1, 2013 - link

    Performance roughly in line with expectations, although the compute performance is a nice surprise. It seems to me like Crystalwell is going into exactly the wrong SKUs and the pricing is borderline atrocious, too.

    Anyway, since you bring up the awards and a "new system" for them, something I've been thinking a bit about is how there doesn't seem to be a page on the site where it is explained what each award is supposed to mean and collects all the products that have received them, which I think would be nice.
    Reply
  • kallogan - Saturday, June 1, 2013 - link

    Where is da power consumption ?????? Reply

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