Performance Over Time & TRIM

SandForce has always exhibited strange behavior when it came to TRIM. Even Intel's custom firmware in the SSD 520 wasn't able to fix SandForce's TRIM problem. The issue happens when the SSD is completely filled with incompressible data (both user LBAs and spare area). Any performance degradation after that point won't be restored with a TRIM pass and instead will require a secure erase to return to new. I didn't expect the 335 to fix this but I still tortured the SSD 335 for 60 minutes, ran AS-SSD, TRIMed and reran AS-SSD:

Intel SSD 335 - Resiliency - AS SSD Sequential Write Speed - 6Gbps
  Clean After Torture (60min) After TRIM
Intel SSD 335 240GB 317.7MB/s 174.2MB/s 176.9MB/s

And the issues persists. This is really a big problem with SandForce drives if you're going to store lots of incompressible data (such as MP3s, H.264 videos and other highly compressed formats) because sequential speeds may suffer even more in the long run. As an OS drive the SSD 335 will do just fine since it won't be full of incompressible data, but I would recommend buying something non-SandForce if the main use will be storage of incompressible data.

AnandTech Storage Bench 2011 - Light Workload Power Consumption
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  • Bull Dog - Monday, October 29, 2012 - link

    Do you have any hard data to back up this these assertions? Or are they just your unfounded opinions?

    I ask because the SSD 830 has a terrific reputation for being reliable. It has even demonstrated an exceptionally impressive lifespan over at XtremeSystems Forums.
    Reply
  • kkwst2 - Monday, October 29, 2012 - link

    Yeah, where's your data on that? I'm not aware of any data that suggests the 830 is less reliable in any way than Crucial or Intel. And my perception from experience and reviews are that Samsung has a significantly better reliability record than Sandforce. All vendors have had firmware issues to some degree, and Intel has had some pretty significant ones. The 8 MB issue on the 320 that caused data loss comes to mind. Reply
  • Samus - Monday, October 29, 2012 - link

    Honestly the first Intel SSD I've come across dead was an SSD520 120GB, just wont detect by the system, clearly a Sandforce controller problem.

    I'd never seen an Intel SSD fail until now that (August 2012) and Intel has made a big mistake joining the likes of OCZ quality with its Sandforce marriage.
    Reply
  • JonnyDough - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    You must forget about all the issues that plague hard drives. Reply
  • MichaelD - Tuesday, October 30, 2012 - link

    To what "Samsung drivers" are you referring? You don't need to load any drivers for this or any other SSD (at least in Windows 7, 8 and Server 2012). The driver is provided by Microsoft and has a date of 2006.

    And I'll note that Samsung SSDs are not plagued by the infamous "Sandforce controller bug." And that Samsung makes the controller the NAND and everything else in the SSD.

    So how again, is it less reliable than other SSDs?
    Reply
  • centosfan - Wednesday, October 31, 2012 - link

    I don't think you know what you are talking about. I have two Samsung 830's and use them everyday and push they quite hard. Haven't had 1 single issue. I haven't heard of any problems with them either. Reply
  • hrga - Thursday, November 1, 2012 - link

    It all depends about the market Samsung 830 128GB is here 170USD while 256GB version is 400USD so they aint affordable at all. While Intel 520 series 240GB costs 350USD and 120GB 180USD respectively Reply
  • seapeople - Friday, November 2, 2012 - link

    So $170 and 128GB is less affordable than $180 and 120GB? You live in strange world. Reply
  • djshortsleeve - Monday, October 29, 2012 - link

    I dont see the need for all these various models. Make a value drive and a high end one. You either buy cheapest or best. Reply
  • Kristian Vättö - Monday, October 29, 2012 - link

    That's essentially what Intel offers. SSD 335 is the value drive, whereas the successor of SSD 520 will be the high-end one. SSD 335 and 330 are basically the same and 335 will replace the 330 sooner than later (I'm hearing Q1'13 for the other capacities). Reply

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