SuperPi 32M

32M is one of those benches one could waste an eternity in trying out various tweaks on both the board and in the operating systems. We decided to keep things short and simple for this review by optimizing the basic memory options and Bclk rates to show differences in how each board sets up sub-timings using the same processor and memory clocks on a given multiplier. All the boards managed the same 22x 234 BCLK using the 2:8 memory ratio.

ASUS trails by virtue of a very loose set of default sub timings. Unfortunately, we lost our ASUS ROG board to the Foxconn socket meltdown problem at this point. This also damaged our best CPU in the process so were unable to push further in this particular benchmark as our replacement processors did not clock as well.

The EVGA E659 did not fare as well as the other boards in this benchmark using the 2:10 memory ratio. No matter what we tried we could not get the board to pass 32M any higher than 226~227 BCLK in this bench. Moving over to the 2:8 ratio the E659 managed to out clock the other boards for raw CPU frequency. However, raw memory bandwidth and tight latencies favor this benchmark over the small differences in CPU frequency in our results so the lack of stability with the 2:10 memory ratio is adversely affecting the E659.


Super Pi 32m - Max CPU Clock
WPrime 1024M What is RTL?
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  • Rajinder Gill - Saturday, November 7, 2009 - link

    For max BCLK testingPCI/e speeds were increased (where required) to 115MHz or so (the highest the CPU's I had could run were between 115-118MHz). I tried changes to RTL, memory dividers and all voltages were also changed. Subtiming ranges were shifted out to near maximums to see if that helped and also matched between the best and worst boards in the tests just to make sure something was not creating a hurdle.

    regards
    Raja
    Reply
  • dingetje - Friday, November 6, 2009 - link

    wow the p55 platform is totally screwd if this problem persists...any overclocker still oc'ing the hell out of their p55 must be either brave, rich or (michael jackson voice on:) ignoraaaant Reply
  • dingetje - Friday, November 6, 2009 - link

    oops, this was supposed to be a comment, not a reply...damn UI :P Reply
  • dingetje - Friday, November 6, 2009 - link

    now if we could only edit our posts I would so happy Reply
  • petergab - Friday, November 6, 2009 - link

    What about any MSI boards? I know they may not count to the "extreme" OC but I think they should have a representative in such reviews. Reply
  • Rajinder Gill - Friday, November 6, 2009 - link

    The MSI board was due to be included but left out becasue of CPU damage that occurred during the socket burnouts. This left no real way of cross comparing the prior results with the MSI boards abilities on the same CPU. At that point I decided to run with what I had at the time rather than starting afresh thus delaying the article even further.

    regards
    Raja


    Reply
  • spiderbutt - Friday, November 6, 2009 - link

    Are you planning to include the MSI boards at a later date? I am curious to see how they compare to the other boards.

    Thanks for your hard work Raja it is appreciated!
    Reply
  • Rajinder Gill - Friday, November 6, 2009 - link

    Hi,

    There will be some MSI P55 board reviews coming, although those were planned in more typical usage scenarios. I guess what I can do is use a different CPU in the E657 EVGA board for cross compare to any high-end P55 MSI offering we review to see how things stack up.

    regards
    Raja
    Reply
  • 1stguess - Friday, November 6, 2009 - link

    Wow. This is a bold article. Does anyone dare OC their P55 setup? Madness. Reply
  • jav6454 - Friday, November 6, 2009 - link

    I've been looking at these P55 boards and somehow I always thought high of the EVGA. However these results have proven my gut feeling right.

    Bad thing of the EVGA boards is sometimes their higher price tag.

    Reply

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