SYSMark 2007

Our first test is the full SYSMark 2007 benchmark suite. It's a system-level performance test that measures performance based on average response time, making it a great candidate for our SSDs, which should provide pretty low response times, at least compared to standard mechanical disks.

SYSMark 2007 Preview Rating

SYSMark is a better CPU test than a storage test, but it still shows that all of these SSDs are easily capable of delivering performance greater than or equal to the VelociRaptor. Note that the JMicron drives are both slower than the 5400RPM notebook hard drive in this test.

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Video Creation

Productivity

3D

Random Read/Write Performance PCMark Vantage
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  • Dennis Travis - Friday, March 20, 2009 - link

    Excellent and informative article as always Anand. Thanks so much for posting the truth!! Reply
  • IsLNdbOi - Friday, March 20, 2009 - link

    Can't remember what page it was, but you showed some charts on the performance of SSDs at their lowest possible performance levels.

    At their lowest possible performance levels are they still faster than the 300GB Raptor?
    Reply
  • Edgemeal - Friday, March 20, 2009 - link

    It's too bad Windows and applications don't let you select where all the data that needs to be updated and saved to is stored. If that was an option a SSD could be used to only load data (EXE files and support files) and a HDD could be used to store files that are updated frequently, like a web browser for example, their constantly caching files, from the sound of this article that would kill the performance of a SSD in no time.

    Great article, I'll stick to HDDs for now.
    Reply
  • Luddite - Friday, March 20, 2009 - link

    So even with the TRIM command, when working with large files, say, in photoshop and saving multiple layers, the performance will stil drop off? Reply
  • proviewIT - Thursday, March 19, 2009 - link

    I bought a Vertex 120GB and it is NOT working on my Nvidia chipsets motherboard. Anyone met the same problem? I tried intel chipsets motherboard and seems ok.
    I used HDtach to test the read/write performance 4 days ago, wow, it was amazing. 160MB/s in write. But today I felt it slower and used HDtach to test again, it downs to single digit MB per second. Can I recover it or I need to return it?
    Reply
  • kmmatney - Thursday, March 19, 2009 - link

    Based on the results and price, I would say that the OCZ Vertex deserves a Editor's choice of some sort (Gold, Silver)... Reply
  • Tattered87 - Thursday, March 19, 2009 - link

    While I must admit I skipped over some of the more technical bits where SSD was explained in detail, I read the summaries and I've gotta admit this article was extremely helpful. I've been wanting to get one of these for a long time now but they've seemed too infantile in technological terms to put such a hefty investment in, until now.

    After reading about OCZ's response to you and how they've stepped it up and are willing to cut unimportant statistics in favor of lower latencies, I actually decided to purchase one myself. Figured I might as well show my appreciation to OCZ by grabbing up a 60GB SSD, not to mention it looks like it's by far the best purchase I can make SSD-wise for $200.

    Thanks for the awesome article, was a fun read, that's for sure.
    Reply
  • bsoft16384 - Thursday, March 19, 2009 - link

    Anand, I don't want to sound too negative in my comments. While I wouldn't call them unusable, there's no doubt that the random write performance of the JMicron SSDs sucks. I'm glad that you're actually running random I/O tests when so many other websites just run HDTune and call it a day.

    That X25-M for $340 is looking mighty tempting, though.
    Reply
  • MrSpadge - Thursday, March 19, 2009 - link

    Hi,

    first: great article, thanks to Anand and OCZ!

    Something crossed my mind when I saw the firmware-based trade-off between random writes and sequential transfer rates: couldn't that be adjusted dynamically to get the best of both worlds? Default to the current behaviour but switch into something resembling te old one when extensive sequential transfers are detected?

    Of course this neccesiates that the processor would be able to handle additional load and that the firmware changes don't involve permanent changes in the organization of the data.

    Maybe the OCZ-Team already thought about this and maybe nobody's going to read this post, buried deep within the comments..

    MrS
    Reply
  • Per Hansson - Thursday, March 19, 2009 - link

    Great work on the review Anand
    I really enjoyed reading it and learning from it
    Will there be any tests of the old timers like Mtron etc?
    Reply

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