Phenom vs. Phenom II - Clock for Clock

Before we get to how fast this thing is, it's important to look at how much faster we are compared to the original Phenom. Clock speed alone should be able to deliver a good 5 - 15% performance improvement, but the larger L3 cache and other fixes included in the chip should account for more.

In order to find out how much more performance the L3 changes bring, I performed a very simple experiment: I took a Phenom 9950BE and overclocked it to 2.8GHz. I then compared it to a Phenom II X4 920, also running at 2.8GHz. I chose a subset of the test suite I ran for today's review, but it should be enough to give you an indication of what the more balanced cache hierarchy does for performance:

Processor Excel Monte Carlo (lower is better) Adobe Photoshop CS4 (lower is better) x264 Pass 2 3dsmax 9 Cinebench WinRAR (lower is better) Left 4 Dead FarCry 2
AMD Phenom II X4 920 (2.8GHz) 31.3s 25.8s 16.6 fps 10.2 11440 123s 110.2 fps 43.3 fps
AMD Phenom @ 2.8GHz 43.4s 27.9s 15.9 fps 9.6 10948 144s 99.8 fps 42.1 fps
% Improvement 27.9% 7.5% 4.4% 6.3% 4.5% 14.6% 10.2% 2.9%

The performance improvements here are good - very good. At the high-end we see a nearly 30% gain at the same clock speed and at the low end a 2.9% increase at 2.8GHz.

These applications span the gamut, including everything from a high-end financial model simulation with the Excel test, to basic file compression with WinRAR. Phenom II offers real world benefits over the original, largely due to its more balanced cache structure. With enough L3 cache for all cores to be fed, no one is left hungry.

We see the potential for real performance improvements in gaming as compared to the original Phenom, which could restore AMD's competitiveness in an area where it has been forced to rely on also having a strong GPU for quite some time now. All in all, the performance improvements and changes to cache structure we've been talking about over the past few pages are real - Phenom II is better than the original. But is it good enough?

Socket-AM2, AM2+ and AM3: Backwards Compatibility Hooray, AMD is Overclockable Again
POST A COMMENT

93 Comments

View All Comments

  • rudolphna - Thursday, January 8, 2009 - link

    Hey anand, do you think you could grill AMD and see if you can get out of them which chips will be made at the upcoming Malta, NY fab facility? Will it be PII or maybe bulldozer? Reply
  • mkruer - Thursday, January 8, 2009 - link

    Anand, I do alot of paring and although the recovery rate is good, i would like to see the results for creating a par2 file. Reply
  • Natfly - Thursday, January 8, 2009 - link

    I'm glad AMD is somewhat competitive in the quad core realm but I just cannot get over how blindingly fast the Core i7s are. It is incredible.

    I hope AMD can make it through, for consumer's (and my stock's) sake. This is a step in the right direction.
    Reply
  • xusaphiss - Thursday, January 8, 2009 - link

    Come on, guys! I like a competitive market as much as the next guy but AMD is a whole generation behind. They should have had these when the 45nm C2s came out!

    AMD is lapped!

    It's time for them to die!

    CPU standards will only go down if they actually resort to third-party distribution!

    Their video cards are always run hotter than NVIDIA and just less stable and overclockable. The only way they was able to stay alive in the race was pitting two of their GPUs against one on one board. NVIDIA hasn't even begun using DDR5 yet!

    Intel and NVIDIA is not really receiving competition from AMD. AMD is just lowering standards.

    Reply
  • ThePooBurner - Saturday, January 10, 2009 - link

    PLAYSTATION THREE is that you? Reply
  • aeternitas - Thursday, January 8, 2009 - link

    We would not of had C2D for years, if not for AMD. Please sit down your logic is flawed. Reply
  • Kroneborge - Thursday, January 8, 2009 - link

    Oh, let's hope AMD doesn't die. Or you can add a couple hundred on to the price of all your favorite Intel processors lol. Reply
  • Genx87 - Thursday, January 8, 2009 - link

    This one is simply not going to cut the butter by the middle of 09. True they are cutting into the Core 2 Duo's performance advantage. It still for the most part falls short. And I didnt see this thing really challange the i7 which will be Intels flagship chip by the end of 09. I dont know about AMD's future chips. But the Phenom needs an arch replacement for AMD to compete with Intel. Reply
  • JakeAMD - Thursday, January 8, 2009 - link

    I would suggest an amazing PC experience is about far more than benchmarks or the performance of one component. Some benchmarks today are at risk of losing relevance to real application performance. For example, performance on 3DMark Vantage scores don’t necessarily translate into a better gaming performance. Also, the CPU-only approach to video processing performance is now thoroughly outmoded, as that should be offloaded to the GPU. The Dragon platform technology is really within the budgets people are affording themselves today and we’re doing a better job of serving the real needs of the PC market today. So I would ask you – Is $1000 or more worth the performance difference?
    Reply
  • Genx87 - Friday, January 9, 2009 - link

    I am looking at these gaming benchmarks which is the most intensive thing I do on my computer. My 180 dollar E8400 is cheaper and faster.

    On the server side the i7 looks more attractive for my virtualization and sql server upgrade project. Where $1000 is pennies on the dollar. Though when you factor in total system cost it is usually not even that much.

    Anyways the i7 will come down in price over the course of 09 as a consumer friendly platform is released and the cost of DDR3 falls as production ramps. So it wont cost 1000 more for an i7 system for long. And I question whether an i7 system costs that much more now.

    Reply

Log in

Don't have an account? Sign up now