Features and Specifications

As a brief overview of some of the display features and specifications, we again refer back to our earlier Gateway FPD2485W review. How important the individual specifications are is up for debate, and what matters to one person may not matter at all to someone else. We will cover that aspect of the displays in a moment, but first here are the manufacturer specifications.

Dell 2407WFP Specifications
Video Inputs Analog (VGA)
Digital (DVI with HDCP support)
Component
Composite
S-Video
Panel Type LCD Active Matrix TFT S-PVA
Pixel Pitch 0.270mm
Colors 16.7 million
Brightness 450 cd/m2
Contrast Ratio 1000:1
Response Time 16ms TrTf
6ms (GTG)
Viewable Size 24" diagonal
Resolution 1920x1200
Viewing Angle 178 vertical/horizontal
Power Consumption 57W typical
110W max
Power Savings 2W
Power Supply Built-in
Screen Treatment Antiglare with hard-coating 3H
Height-Adjustable Yes
Tilt Yes
Rotation Yes
Auto-Rotation Yes
Swivel Yes
VESA Wall Mounting 100mmx100mm
Dimensions w/ Base (WxHxD) 22.04"x15.27"x7.68" (lowered)
22.04"x23.02"x7.68" (raised)
Weight w/ Stand 18.3 lbs
Dimensions w/o Base (WxHxD) 22.04"x14.35"x3.25"
Weight w/o Stand 14.3 lbs
Additional Features (4) USB 2.0 (USB connection to PC required)
9-in-2 flash reader (CF/SD/MS/SM/MMC)
Audio Optional Full-length Speaker Bar
(Integrated power connection to main panel)
Limited Warranty 3 year parts/labor warranty standard
4 and 5 year warranty optional
Advanced Exchange policy
Pixel Defect Policy 6 or more total stuck pixels
3 or more clustered (one inch circle)

Dell 3007WFP Specifications
Video Inputs DVI-D Dual-Link HDCP
Compatible with Single-Link DVI for 1280x800 with HDCP
Panel Type LCD Active Matrix TFT S-IPS
Pixel Pitch 0.250mm
Colors 16.7 million
Brightness 400 cd/m2
Contrast Ratio 700:1
Response Time 14ms TrTf
11ms (GTG)
Viewable Size 30" diagonal
Resolution 2560x1600
Viewing Angle 178 vertical/horizontal
Power Consumption 147W typical
177W max
Power Savings 3W
Power Supply Built-in
Screen Treatment Antiglare with hard-coating 3H
Height-Adjustable Yes
Tilt Yes
Rotation No
Auto-Rotation N/A
Swivel Yes
VESA Wall Mounting 100mmx100mm
Dimensions w/ Base (WxHxD) 27.16"x18.49"x7.87" (lowered)
27.16"x22.00"x7.87" (raised)
Weight w/ Stand 35 lbs
Dimensions w/o Base (WxHxD) 27.16"x17.70"x2.93"
Weight w/o Stand 25 lbs
Additional Features (4) USB 2.0 (USB connection to PC required)
9-in-2 flash reader (CF/SD/MS/SM/MMC)
Audio Optional Full-length Speaker Bar
(Integrated power connection to main panel)
Limited Warranty 3 year parts/labor warranty standard
4 and 5 year warranty optional
Advanced Exchange policy
Pixel Defect Policy 6 or more total stuck pixels
3 or more clustered (one inch circle)

Many of the specifications are nearly identical, which isn't too surprising given that both of the displays are made by the same company. The major difference of course is that the 3007WFP is larger; the viewable diagonal is 25% greater which works out to 56% more screen area. The 3007WFP also comes with a higher resolution (2560x1600 compared to 1920x1200), which means it has 77% more pixels. That also means the individual pixel dot pitch is going to be slightly smaller on the 3007WFP, resulting in a generally clearer picture.

The larger size of the 3007WFP doesn't come without drawbacks, unfortunately. First, bigger isn't always better, and there are definitely people out there that feel a 30" LCD is going to be too big sitting on their desk. Perhaps a bigger drawback is that the 3007WFP is extremely limited when it comes to video inputs: you get a single DVI-D connection and that's it! The DVI port is designed for use with dual-link the DVI devices, as dual-link is necessary in order to support the native 2560x1600 resolution. Single-link DVI support is also available, but while single-link DVI is technically capable of supporting a 1920x1200 resolution the 3007WFP only supports a maximum 1280x800 resolution when using single-link DVI.

That brings us to perhaps the biggest flaw of the 3007WFP: HDCP support. While the LCD does include HDCP support, HDCP was unfortunately not created to work with dual-link DVI. If you want to use the 3007WFP to view HDCP protected content, you may find yourself forced to use a single-link DVI connection, which means you would only be able to run the display at one fourth of its native resolution. That's a pretty serious flaw, at least for those users who are interested in HDCP content. Considering the price, anyone interested in a large HTPC setup would probably be better served by a 37" or 42" 1080p HDTV -- not something you would really want sitting on top of a desk, but great for viewing movies.

The 2407WFP also features HDCP support, but the lower native resolution and use of single-link DVI avoid most of the problems associated with its larger sibling. The 24" display also includes far more connection options: DVI, VGA, S-Video, component, and composite inputs are all present. In terms of features, the only difference between the new 2407WFP and the older 2405FPW is the inclusion of HDCP support. Specifications on the 2407WFP are also somewhat improved and the appearance has been changed slightly, but otherwise there's not a huge difference between the old and new 24" Dell LCDs.

One of the good things about Dell's high-end LCDs is that they all come with a standard three-year warranty, including Dell's Advanced Exchange service. If at any point it becomes necessary for Dell to replace your LCD during the warranty period, they will ship out the replacement monitor to you. You can then unpack the new monitor, place your old monitor into the same box, and ship it back to Dell. For a moderate fee you can also extend your warranty to four or five years. The pixel defect policy is also pretty reasonable, as we were informed by a support technician that they will replace an LCD if you have six or more dead pixels or three or more clustered together.

Index Dell 2407WFP: Appearance and Design
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  • Zebo - Friday, March 02, 2007 - link

    The HC is still IPS and even better this time covering 93% of adobe color gamet vs 72% past model and it's more overdriven making it faster. Inputs are still lame with DVI only.

    Right now only corp customers can get the HC.

    There is a non technical review floating around the net with nice pics..hot hardware I think.
    Reply
  • acivick - Friday, March 02, 2007 - link

    As nice as these monitors are, it seems to be that no one is really releasing any new 4:3 or 5:4 monitors anymore. Everything is widescreen. Sure, I think it's great when you're watching movies, but that's why I have a widescreen TV.

    I primarily use my PC for office work and games, neither of which really lend themselves to widescreen very well. Maybe a lot of newer games are coming out with widescreen support, but a good number don't offer it, at least officially.

    Maybe I'm just a minority now, since every company seems to be focusing on it. Anyone else with similar opinions?
    Reply
  • JarredWalton - Friday, March 02, 2007 - link

    I definitely prefer WS displays, even outside of gaming. The ability to easily put two full pages of text next to each other is nice, and it's one of the reasons I don't find portrait mode on larger WS LCDs to be useful. I just wish more games were properly (i.e. natively with proper aspect ratio) supporting widescreen modes. On smaller displays, however, I'm not as big a fan of WS - I'd prefer a 19/20" standard AR over a 19/20" WS display. Basically, if you can't get at least 1680x1050 I'd just as soon stick with a normal AR. Reply
  • yyrkoon - Friday, March 02, 2007 - link

    Personally, I think it would be good to include power usage of LCD monitors you're testing. I know you guys have the equipment already, and this is one of a few reasons why people use LCD vs CRT. Is this information in the article aready ? IF so, I missed it . . . Reply
  • mongo lloyd - Saturday, March 03, 2007 - link

    Lower power consumption with LCDs is mostly a myth nowadays when you're moving up to the bigger and/or brighter monitors. As you can see with the specs here, both these monitors eat as much as (in the case of the 24") and more power than (in the case of the 30") a 21-22" CRT (most commonly ~125 W). The few business-oriented CRTs that are still available usually draw around 75-85 W, which many LCDs do as well.

    So that "benefit with LCD monitors" is also questionable...
    Reply
  • JarredWalton - Friday, March 02, 2007 - link

    It's listed on the specs tables, although those are manufacturer figures. They're generally accurate, however, with a pure white output using more power than a black output. I'll see about adding a quick test of min/max/avg power use on future reviews, though - thanks for the suggestion. Reply
  • tmok2007 - Friday, March 02, 2007 - link

    Sorry, the 3007WFP is selling for $1,350. Where can I find a 37" or 42" 1080p LCD TV for less than this?
    Reply
  • timmiser - Friday, March 02, 2007 - link

    The Westinghouse 37" model is available at Newegg for $999. Reply
  • JarredWalton - Friday, March 02, 2007 - link

    Check Google/Froogle: Westinghouse makes a 1080p 42" that starts at around $1300, and the 37" is slightly less IIRC. Reply
  • exdeath - Friday, March 02, 2007 - link

    Could we add the 2707WFP in there?

    Its a 27" compromise between the wider range of capabilities of the 30" and the smaller size of the 24"

    Single link 1920x1200 with a built in scaler (and thus multiple inputs) but larger than the 24". 1920x1200 is also more manageable for gaming, as even with 8800 SLI some games just can't run fast and smooth enough at 2560x1600.

    As for the .303mm pixel pitch, keep in mind that a 19" 4:3 1280x1024 screen that I would wager is the most common LCD in use right now is like .295mm and I never heard anyone complaining about the 19" displays... I think breaking the .3xx barrier is more of a psychological effect of seeing a "3" in the dot pitch spec more than anyone being truly disturbed by perceived graininess. Also, the 37" and 42" screens people love for their HDTVs are like .85mm pitch...

    Anyone, could you maybe update later with the 2707WFP as well? I'm considering getting one, and the metal and glass trim would go well with my ATC111 and glass desk :)
    Reply

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