Removing the Outer Shell

The first step is to remove the outer plastic shell that conceals the innards of the system. To do this, you must start by removing the face plate. Take a look at the front of the Xbox 360 and insert your thumb into the door that covers the two USB ports on the right of the unit. With your other hand squeezing the upper and lower sides of the face plate, pull out the face plate with your thumb. With not much force, the face plate should pop right off.


Click to Enlarge

After the face plate has been pulled off you will see a silver Microsoft sticker covering a gap; remove this. You will also see four small clips locking the top half of the plastic shell to the bottom half. Do not attempt to wedge the clips out at this point.

With some care, gently bend outwards, the right gray ventilation shield on the right side of the unit so that you can see a bit inside. You will notice that the gray side piece attaches to both the bottom and top white chassis. Now look through the holes on top of the unit to locate the areas where the gray side pieces attaches to the white body. What you need to do is take the long but thin metal stick and push down, through the white holes (located on both the top and bottom of the Xbox 360) where the clips of the gray side pieces connect. Slowly pull out the gray pieces away from the unit while unlocking the clips and eventually the gray piece will release itself.


Click to Enlarge


Click to Enlarge

To remove the left gray piece, you must first remove the hard drive unit by pressing the button located on the unit itself. Then apply the same procedure used to remove the right gray ventilation piece -- except when you reach the bottom clip of the piece, you most remove the rubber feet located directly below, to reveal a hole where you can insert the metal stick.

Once you have both side gray pieces removed, you have essentially removed the main locking mechanism that holds the top and bottom shells together. At this point, return to the front of the unit and turn the entire unit upside down. Using a flat head screw driver or wedge, gently pry up the 4 clips holding the top shell to the bottom. Once the clips are unlatched, slowly lift up the front of the bottom shell about an inch.


Click to Enlarge


Click to Enlarge

The last step to removing the bottom shell cover is to insert a thin and small plastic stick into the thin rectangular holes on the rear. The reason the front of the bottom shell needs to be lifted is to prevent the rear latches from reattaching themselves. Slowly insert the stick into each rectangular opening. You should hear a click sound for each clamp you unlatch. Once complete, you may lift off the bottom shell covering.

Looking inside the unit, you will notice that there are 14 silver screws (6 of which are long) and 8 black screws. Using your torx screw drivers, remove the silver screws using a size T12 screw driver and the black ones using a size T7. Once you have all the screws removed, flip the Xbox 360 right side up and lift up the top plastic shell. You should now be greeted with the internals of the Xbox 360.


Click to Enlarge


Click to Enlarge

What's in the Box, in the Box? (Taking it Apart) Disassembling the Internals of the Xbox 360
POST A COMMENT

91 Comments

View All Comments

  • PrinceGaz - Friday, November 18, 2005 - link

    Just google "cpu dies" - although you get some hits about dead processors, there are many more abot processor manufacturing, more than you get by googling "cpu dice" (the vast majority of those are to do with random number generation).

    The correct trm for more than one CPU die is "dies".
    Reply
  • KristopherKubicki - Sunday, November 20, 2005 - link

    CPU "die" is called that because the CPU is cut from silicon in a specific term called "dicing". "Dice" is in fact the correct word.

    Just because I had nothing better to do this weekend besides beat Kameo in 10 hours, I put together an etymology of all words related to "Die". I'll put that on a website sometime in the near future.

    Kristopher
    Reply
  • yacoub - Monday, November 21, 2005 - link

    That makes little sense. You dice food but you don't call the resulting piece(s) "die" or "dice". However, a processor is made from a die (remember die-cast metal cars when you were a kid?), and if you have more than one of that type of die, you have dies. Even the Google search comparison between "dies" and "dice" confirms that to be true. Reply
  • akugami - Thursday, November 17, 2005 - link

    Anandtech with a comic from www.gucomics.com about their xbox 360 article. Reply
  • yacoub - Thursday, November 17, 2005 - link

    As with the last article here that did this, you want "dies" not "dice".
    quote:

    simply pull the heatsinks off to reveal the GPUs (two dice on the chip)
    Reply
  • yacoub - Thursday, November 17, 2005 - link

    quote:

    332 million transistor GPU is split into two separate dice,


    "Dice" are only in gambling. You want "dies".
    Reply
  • yacoub - Thursday, November 17, 2005 - link

    pl. dies A device used for cutting out, forming, or stamping material, especially:
    An engraved metal piece used for impressing a design onto a softer metal, as in coining money.
    One of several component pieces that are fitted into a diestock to cut threads on screws or bolts.
    A part on a machine that punches shaped holes in, cuts, or forms sheet metal, cardboard, or other stock.
    A metal block containing small conical holes through which plastic, metal, or other ductile material is extruded or drawn.

    pl. dies Architecture. The dado of a pedestal, especially when cube-shaped.


    pl. dice
    A small cube marked on each side with from one to six dots, usually used in pairs in gambling and in various other games.
    dice (used with a sing. verb) A game of chance using dice.


    tr.v. died, die·ing, dies
    To cut, form, or stamp with or as if with a die.
    Reply
  • yacoub - Thursday, November 17, 2005 - link

    quote:

    On a smaller manufacturing process, the dice could be unified,


    DIES. DIES DIES DIES. Yarrr...
    Reply
  • yacoub - Thursday, November 17, 2005 - link

    The worst part is people reading the article who've never heard it used like that before (because it's wrong) are going to think you've got it right and will start saying it. Reply
  • xbdestroya - Thursday, November 17, 2005 - link

    Seriously, is grammar commentary the extent of your thoughts on the article? Reply

Log in

Don't have an account? Sign up now