Resolving Fine Lines

For our resolution test, we reset the camera to its default settings and then used the highest resolution and quality setting. The camera was then set to Aperture-priority (f/11), Manual WB, Parameter 2, and sRGB. For more information, refer to our Testing Procedures page. When reading this chart, the numbers represent lines per picture height (LPH). For example, the number 16 would represent 1,600 LPH. Click on a thumbnail below to see the full chart at 100%.

350D
(+1.3 E.C.)
20D
(+1.3 E.C.)
JPEG/FineDownloadDownload
RAW (JPEG)DownloadDownload
RAW (original)Download
WARNING: 7MB
Download
WARNING: 8MB

Canon 350D VS Canon 20D (JPEG)

Roll your mouse over the 200% crops below to see the difference between the Canon 350D and the Canon 20D JPEG resolution charts.


Hold mouse over image.

In our horizontal crops above, we can see that the resolution for both the 350D and the 20D are essentially the same. Both cameras are able to resolve lines with outstanding detail until 1,700 LPH (lines per picture height). Just past 1,700 LPH, both images begin to show artifacts until the end of the test pattern.


Hold mouse over image.


Again, in the vertical crops above, the resolutions of the 350D and 20D are identical.

UPDATE: Adobe has just released an update to Camera Raw for Photoshop CS2. Below is a comparison of the 350D to the 20D using Camera Raw 3.1.

Canon 350D VS Canon 20D (RAW)

Roll your mouse over the 200% crops below to see the difference between the Canon 350D and the Canon 20D JPEG resolution charts.


Hold mouse over image.

In RAW mode, the 350D is able to produce a very slight gain in resolution compared to the JPEG chart. It is able to resolve lines out to 1,750 LPH. However, some artifacts begin to appear just past 1,700 LPH. The 20D shows fewer artifacts and resolves lines out to 1,800 LPH.

Roll your mouse over the 200% crops below to see the difference between the Canon 350D and the Canon 20D JPEG resolution charts.


Hold mouse over image.

In the vertical crop above, the 350D shows a more signifcant gain - nearly reaching 1,800 LPH before artifacts appear. The 20D proves to be just a bit better than the 350D by producing a cleaner chart and resolving lines out to 1,800 LPH with no artifacts. In terms of resolution, the difference between the 350D and 20D is fairly small. Both cameras are capable of capturing extremely fine detail. The 20D appears to gain more resolution than the 350D when switching from JPEG to RAW mode.

The Timing Tests Color Reproduction
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  • DVad3r - Tuesday, May 03, 2005 - link

    Hmm possibly, what page is the blurb on? Reply
  • STaSh - Tuesday, May 03, 2005 - link

    That's probably the sensor that tracks if the camera is vertical or horizontal. It's used to determine how you want a vertical image to be displayed on the LCD.

    There should be a blurb in the manual about it.
    Reply
  • DVad3r - Tuesday, May 03, 2005 - link

    I have a question to XT owners. I have noticed last night when holding my camera, that there seems to be something loose inside. I was just moving it up and down in my hands trying out different angles when I noticed what seems like something is moving around inside. The camera was brand new when I got it, and packed very nicely, and certainly has not been dropped or exposed to any shock at all. I was wondering if you guys have it too? Reply
  • Rebel II - Thursday, August 25, 2005 - link

    I agree about the noise, there seems to be something loose in the camera. Mine is brand new and has not been subjected to any shock. I've been practicing using it and never noticed anything for the first six days. It is very quiet at times when I am practicing but I have never noticed a sound until the sixth night. I was using a "long exposer time" and after that I noticed a sound everytime I tilted the camera back and forth. I can even feel it as I move it. Everything seems to work the same. I can't figure out why I didn't notice it before. I was ready to return it but decided to check on the web to see what others have experienced. You are the second person to mention this so far as I have just began my search. Reply
  • Possessed Freak - Tuesday, May 03, 2005 - link

    Hrmmm, I may actually have to try one of these out. I still use my Canon AE-1 program for all my picture taking. This DSLR really has me intrigued. Reply
  • NFS4 - Tuesday, May 03, 2005 - link

    Stephen, I got my D70 Kit a few weeks ago from OneCall.com for $899.99 after a $100 Nikon rebate.

    Also don't forget the Nikon D50, which I hope you will be reviewing soon along with the Nikon D70S
    Reply
  • Xtremist - Tuesday, May 03, 2005 - link

    Anyone want to buy the original Rebel? ;-) Man, I WANT one of these lol! Reply
  • roibm - Tuesday, May 03, 2005 - link

    glad it's fixed... I freaked out seeing it didn't work with my default browser(opera) and then not even with firefox.
    I can confirm it works with both as well.
    Reply
  • stephencaston - Tuesday, May 03, 2005 - link

    #6, the javascript problem has been fixed. It now works fine in Firefox, Opera, etc...

    #7, yes the Rebel XT shoots at 72 dpi
    Reply
  • rootaxs - Tuesday, May 03, 2005 - link

    Thanks for the review, would you mind posting though if the processed photo's that come out of the XT are at 300dpi or 72dpi? (e.g. at max resolution, not resized to become a 300dpi image). Reply

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