Gaming Tests: F1 2019

The F1 racing games from Codemasters have been popular benchmarks in the tech community, mostly for ease-of-use and that they seem to take advantage of any area of a machine that might be better than another. The 2019 edition of the game features all 21 circuits on the calendar for that year, and includes a range of retro models and DLC focusing on the careers of Alain Prost and Ayrton Senna. Built on the EGO Engine 3.0, the game has been criticized similarly to most annual sports games, by not offering enough season-to-season graphical fidelity updates to make investing in the latest title worth it, however the 2019 edition revamps up the Career mode, with features such as in-season driver swaps coming into the mix. The quality of the graphics this time around is also superb, even at 4K low or 1080p Ultra.

For our test, we put Alex Albon in the Red Bull in position #20, for a dry two-lap race around Austin. We test at the following settings:

  • 768p Ultra Low, 1440p Ultra Low, 4K Ultra Low, 1080p Ultra

In terms of automation, F1 2019 has an in-game benchmark that can be called from the command line, and the output file has frame times. We repeat each resolution setting for a minimum of 10 minutes, taking the averages and percentiles.

AnandTech Low Resolution
Low Quality
Medium Resolution
Low Quality
High Resolution
Low Quality
Medium Resolution
Max Quality
Average FPS
95th Percentile

 

The Ego engine is usually a good bet where cores, IPC, and frequency matters. Despite this, the 11700K isn't showing much of a generational improvement.

All of our benchmark results can also be found in our benchmark engine, Bench.

Gaming Tests: Borderlands 3 Gaming Tests: Far Cry 5
POST A COMMENT

540 Comments

View All Comments

  • ottonis - Saturday, March 6, 2021 - link

    How is Ryzen 5800x AMD's "best of the best"?
    It clearly is not but just about somewhere in the middle. If you want AMD's best consumer CPU, you gonna look at the 5950x.
    From the perspective of AMD, completely outsourcing manufacturing was the only way to reap the benefits of latest and greatest process nodes.
    Now, that everybody else, incl. the automobile industry, the consoles, Apple, and even Intel are booking production capacities at TMSC, has certainly contributed to Reaching capacity limits and thus to AMD CPU shortages.
    It is predicted that shortages will be mostly (hopefully) sorted out by this summer.
    But yes, now that AMD are earning quite a lot of money they should buy some TSMC stock and try to partner up, getting more production capacity in the future.
    Reply
  • Fulljack - Saturday, March 6, 2021 - link

    did you just forgetting why AMD spin-off it's fab on the first place?

    we don't know exactly how much AMD put out their desktop chips from TSMC plant, and as far as we know, the market are still growing in size. while AMD market share are still a long way from reaching 50%, they still have their processor sold out all over the place.

    honestly I don't get what you're trying to say here.
    Reply
  • shady28 - Saturday, March 6, 2021 - link

    Actually we do know, they made ~1M Zen 3 chips in Q4. 140M PCs were shipped. Based on their market share, about 3% of the chips AMD shipped in Q4 were Zen 3.

    Source:https://wccftech.com/amd-shipped-nearly-1-million-...
    Reply
  • inighthawki - Monday, March 8, 2021 - link

    5800X = "Best of the best"
    11700K = "medium level SKU"

    Your bias is showing.
    Reply
  • Bluetooth - Saturday, March 6, 2021 - link

    Does any one know the details of Intels 10 nm node problems. Any article discussing that in technical details? Reply
  • dihartnell - Thursday, March 11, 2021 - link

    I think adored tv did a few articles, videos on this. As I understand it thier main issues are they use a monolithic die (everything on on a single die) that gets harder to make as the process shrinks, IE more dies have defects... AMD got around this by going chiplet, lots of small dies which meant more of them are good. Until Intel chnages to chiplet or they find a way to improve the manufacturing process to lower the defect rate then they will struggle. Reply
  • Santoval - Saturday, March 6, 2021 - link

    Class action for what, excessive power bills? :) Imagine using this during a heatwave in an airless room. Since it doubles as a heater you would need to have the AC on all the time. If you have no AC there will be a competition between who dies first, you or the processor? ^.^ Reply
  • sabot00 - Friday, March 5, 2021 - link

    Indeed! I have been reading nothing but wccftech and Tom's leaks. Absolutely amazing surprise this Friday night while searching Rocket Lake Reply
  • Beaver M. - Saturday, March 6, 2021 - link

    I would be very cautious testing or believing results with the Z590 platforms long before Rocket Lakes official release.
    Ive tested 3 of those boards with my Comet Lake (Asus, MSI and ASRock) and they all had pretty bad BIOS versions still, with PCIe/IO performance being low in SSD 4K benchmarks and getting weird frame time stutters from time to time (only noticeable when actually playing or looking at a realtime graph). Not to mention Intels drivers are still bad as well.
    On none of them even very basic features like the sleep state worked!
    Comparing this review with user benchmarks in German forums shows huge differences, so theres not much to add to this.

    That said, I have to laugh when Americans or people from other countries with cheap power complain about the power draw.
    And seeing fanboys downplay the performance of AVX and ignoring that it was always power hungry, even 6 years ago, is another obvious thing. Without it RKL actually runs pretty cool for being ancient 14nm.

    And of course I love the geniuses who still think that you cant use the iGPU without it being connected to a monitor, or dont know about the new power saving/GPU switching feature. Not that this article didnt fail at pretty much everything, incl. explaining things like that.
    Reply
  • Gigaplex - Saturday, March 6, 2021 - link

    "That said, I have to laugh when Americans or people from other countries with cheap power complain about the power draw."
    Electricity is expensive where I live, but that's not why I want low power consumption. The more power it consumes, the louder the cooling solution will be. That's why my last system was Intel (Ivy Bridge) and my current system is AMD (Zen 3).
    Reply

Log in

Don't have an account? Sign up now