Gaming Tests: Final Fantasy XIV

Despite being one number less than Final Fantasy 15, because FF14 is a massively-multiplayer online title, there are always yearly update packages which give the opportunity for graphical updates too. In 2019, FFXIV launched its Shadowbringers expansion, and an official standalone benchmark was released at the same time for users to understand what level of performance they could expect. Much like the FF15 benchmark we’ve been using for a while, this test is a long 7-minute scene of simulated gameplay within the title. There are a number of interesting graphical features, and it certainly looks more like a 2019 title than a 2010 release, which is when FF14 first came out.

With this being a standalone benchmark, we do not have to worry about updates, and the idea for these sort of tests for end-users is to keep the code base consistent. For our testing suite, we are using the following settings:

  • 768p Minimum, 1440p Minimum, 4K Minimum, 1080p Maximum

As with the other benchmarks, we do as many runs until 10 minutes per resolution/setting combination has passed, and then take averages. Realistically, because of the length of this test, this equates to two runs per setting.

AnandTech Low Resolution
Low Quality
Medium Resolution
Low Quality
High Resolution
Low Quality
Medium Resolution
Max Quality
Average FPS

As the resolution increases, the 11900K seemed to get a better average frame rate, but with the quality increased, it falls back down again, coming behind the older Intel CPUs.

All of our benchmark results can also be found in our benchmark engine, Bench.

Gaming Tests: Deus Ex Mankind Divided Gaming Tests: Final Fantasy XV
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  • schujj07 - Tuesday, March 30, 2021 - link

    It would have the exact same power draw under AVX512 as AVX2. The 142ishW draw is socket maximum. The only way to increase power draw to the CPU socket is to change sockets. Reply
  • maroon1 - Tuesday, March 30, 2021 - link

    Only way to get same power draw with AVX-512 is to lower clock speed a lot which effects performance Reply
  • schujj07 - Tuesday, March 30, 2021 - link

    That doesn't change the fact that Ryzen is socket limited for power draw. While lowering clocks affects performance, AVX512 could still be faster at same power draw on Ryzen. Reply
  • whatthe123 - Wednesday, March 31, 2021 - link

    Zen 3 isn't socket limited. All you have to do is enable PBO and you can manually set the package limit to whatever you want. I can set my 5900x power limit to whatever I want, though the boost gains aren't worth the extra heat. Reply
  • Qasar - Wednesday, March 31, 2021 - link

    um yes it is, 142 watts is as much as it can use : " Notably, AMD's decision to stick with the AM4 socket still constrains its maximum power consumption to 142W, which means that it could not increase power consumption for the new flagship models. "
    from here : https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-ryzen-5-5...
    Reply
  • TheinsanegamerN - Wednesday, March 31, 2021 - link

    Hrm um yeah, no, you're wrong.

    Gamers nexus measured over 190 watts on a 2700x, which is socket AM4:

    https://www.gamersnexus.net/hwreviews/3287-amd-r7-...
    Reply
  • 29a - Wednesday, March 31, 2021 - link

    Thats overclocked, non overclocked wattage is 142W. Nice try. Reply
  • SaturnusDK - Wednesday, March 31, 2021 - link

    AM4 and whatever intel calls the current iteration of the 1150/1151/1200 socket has the exact same technical power limit. Well, almost. It's 142W vs 144W. Usually written as 125W (+15%).
    You can safely draw double that wattage through the socket though on both platforms. The interesting thing is that the 11th gen apparently throws all sense and caution to the wind in an attempt to stay competitive that they're willing to accept an obscene RMA percentage on the sales.
    Reply
  • whatthe123 - Wednesday, March 31, 2021 - link

    Toms literally contradicts itself in that article by running 5900x with PBO at 172 watt. Socket is not the limit, the bios imposed PPT is the limit. Reply
  • Oxford Guy - Wednesday, March 31, 2021 - link

    What cooler was used? It bet it was stronger than the Noctua used here for AMD. Reply

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