At the all-digital CES 2021 event, ASUS has unveiled a brand new convertible 14" gaming laptop, the ROG Flow X13. The Flow X13 can harness the power of AMD's Ryzen 9 5980HS mobile processor, with an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 graphics card, with a flippable 360° touch screen.

The ASUS ROG Flow X13 represents an interesting segue into the gaming capable convertible space. Some of its most notable design aspects revolve around the 13.4" display, which has a 16:10 aspect ratio, with support for both touch and stylus input. The screen is coated with robust Corning Gorilla Glass, supports adaptive sync, and includes Pantone color validation. In terms of specification, the panel will be available with either 1080p 120 Hz or at 4K.

One of the biggest features includes its ability to convert into four different configurations on the fly, including a regular laptop, tablet, tent, and stand modes. Looking at the internals, the ROG Flow X13 will support up to and including the Ryzen 9 5980HS mobile processor, with up to and including NVIDIA GTX 1650 graphics. ASUS also states that it will be using AMD's top binned CPUs for this model to ensure the best performance and highest quality silicon.

Another claim from ASUS is that the ROG Flow X13's battery can hold out up to 18 hours, with 10 hours of expected battery life during continuous video playback. It comes supplied with its new 100 W USB Type-C PD charger that can charge an empty battery to 60% in around 39 minutes.

ASUS hasn't revealed when the ROG Flow X13 will be available to buy and hasn't supplied any pricing information.

Interested in more of the latest industry news? Check out our CES 2021 trade show landing page!

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  • timecop1818 - Wednesday, January 13, 2021 - link

    99% of typical GPU workloads on a mobile like this are not going to be constrained by 4x pcie links. Reply
  • Tamz_msc - Thursday, January 14, 2021 - link

    You couldn't be more wrong. Reply
  • Slash3 - Thursday, January 14, 2021 - link

    You underestimate Timecop. Reply
  • Tams80 - Thursday, January 14, 2021 - link

    Then pray tell why Thunderbolt eGPUs haven't taken off... Reply
  • Spunjji - Friday, January 15, 2021 - link

    Thunderbolt performance isn't just limited by the width of the link, timecrap - latency also plays a huge part of why you never get more than about 80% of the GPU's optimal performance, with pathological cases going as low as 60%.

    I'm also not sure what you think 99% of workloads on a system explicitly designed for use with a gaming dock would be, if not gaming?
    Reply
  • Spunjji - Wednesday, January 13, 2021 - link

    Way to bury the lede by not mentioning the PCIe 3.0 8x dock! Very very interesting. Reply
  • Digital COrpus - Wednesday, January 13, 2021 - link

    80-pin OCuLink, x8-wide (SFF-8621/SFF-9400, aka Molex "Nano-Pitch I/O") with a USB Type C connector likely for power delivery, in a custom over-mold. A photo of the custom GPU PCBs is up on videocards:
    https://videocardz.com/newz/asus-announces-rog-flo...

    Those are 2, 40-pin connectors, aka x4 links in the top left. Aggregating 2, x4 OCuLink connectors to a x8-wide PCIe is supported in the spec by the PCIe SIG, but I don't understand why they would split the link internally. Except, unless, the IO on the dock is on a x4-wide bus and the GPU is on a x4-wide bus.
    Reply
  • Spunjji - Friday, January 15, 2021 - link

    I think the IO on the dock is also via the USB Type-C. Not sure why they'd split the link, though. Reply

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