CPU Tests: Synthetic

Most of the people in our industry have a love/hate relationship when it comes to synthetic tests. On the one hand, they’re often good for quick summaries of performance and are easy to use, but most of the time the tests aren’t related to any real software. Synthetic tests are often very good at burrowing down to a specific set of instructions and maximizing the performance out of those. Due to requests from a number of our readers, we have the following synthetic tests.

Linux OpenSSL Speed: SHA256

One of our readers reached out in early 2020 and stated that he was interested in looking at OpenSSL hashing rates in Linux. Luckily OpenSSL in Linux has a function called ‘speed’ that allows the user to determine how fast the system is for any given hashing algorithm, as well as signing and verifying messages.

OpenSSL offers a lot of algorithms to choose from, and based on a quick Twitter poll, we narrowed it down to the following:

  1. rsa2048 sign and rsa2048 verify
  2. sha256 at 8K block size
  3. md5 at 8K block size

For each of these tests, we run them in single thread and multithreaded mode. All the graphs are in our benchmark database, Bench, and we use the sha256 and md5 results in published reviews.

(8-3c) Linux OpenSSL Speed sha256 8K Block (1T)(8-4c) Linux OpenSSL Speed sha256 8K Block (nT)

(8-3d) Linux OpenSSL Speed md5 8K Block (1T)(8-4d) Linux OpenSSL Speed md5 8K Block (nT)

GeekBench 5: Link

As a common tool for cross-platform testing between mobile, PC, and Mac, GeekBench is an ultimate exercise in synthetic testing across a range of algorithms looking for peak throughput. Tests include encryption, compression, fast Fourier transform, memory operations, n-body physics, matrix operations, histogram manipulation, and HTML parsing.

I’m including this test due to popular demand, although the results do come across as overly synthetic, and a lot of users often put a lot of weight behind the test due to the fact that it is compiled across different platforms (although with different compilers).

We have both GB5 and GB4 results in our benchmark database. GB5 was introduced to our test suite after already having tested ~25 CPUs, and so the results are a little sporadic by comparison. These spots will be filled in when we retest any of the CPUs.

(8-1c) Geekbench 5 Single Thread(8-1d) Geekbench 5 Multi-Thread

CPU Tests: Legacy and Web Gaming Tests: Chernobylite
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  • brunis.dk - Tuesday, November 24, 2020 - link

    It's nothing compared to the price premiums Intel used to charge for their performance leadership. Reply
  • Diggodo - Monday, January 11, 2021 - link

    You might want to rethink what you've just claimed.. and I'm very confused why you would think 5950x is worth it unless you absolutely need the extra cores for work. Its $750 MSRP compared to $550 🤦‍♂️. I'm curious why you say otherwise because every Intel 10th gen-11th gen chip have been duds really.

    The 5900x is a steal for it's price and is a killer chip. The price hike means nothing because the 3900x was 499 when it came out.
    Reply
  • Santoval - Monday, November 9, 2020 - link

    Not just in price/performance this time, in performance period. Reply
  • leexgx - Thursday, November 5, 2020 - link

    Rip anandtech server been overloaded (to many views I and to reload like 8 times just to get to this page about to try and use the print to show all pages good luck to me trying that so I can read everything ) Reply
  • NickOne - Thursday, November 5, 2020 - link

    Yeah, probably Intel server Reply
  • Drkrieger01 - Thursday, November 5, 2020 - link

    Just my $0.02 as a sysadmin, it's likely a limited bandwidth issue, not server access/drive IOPS. Reply
  • lmcd - Thursday, November 5, 2020 - link

    Probably all the other website editors looking for the best one-line quote to include Reply
  • Orkiton - Thursday, November 5, 2020 - link

    Intel will buy TSMC and Rip out Amd :)) Reply
  • Hifihedgehog - Thursday, November 5, 2020 - link

    Wishful thinking. That's like a Bulldog trying to eat a Great Dane. Reply
  • fazalmajid - Thursday, November 5, 2020 - link

    Er, TSMC’s market cap is double Intel’s. Reply

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