Xe-LP GPU Performance: Deus Ex Mankind Divided

Deus Ex is a franchise with a wide level of popularity. Despite the Deus Ex: Mankind Divided (DEMD) version being released in 2016, it has often been heralded as a game that taxes the CPU. It uses the Dawn Engine to create a very complex first-person action game with science-fiction based weapons and interfaces. The game combines first-person, stealth, and role-playing elements, with the game set in Prague, dealing with themes of transhumanism, conspiracy theories, and a cyberpunk future. The game allows the player to select their own path (stealth, gun-toting maniac) and offers multiple solutions to its puzzles.

DEMD has an in-game benchmark, an on-rails look around an environment showcasing some of the game’s most stunning effects, such as lighting, texturing, and others. Even in 2020, it’s still an impressive graphical showcase when everything is jumped up to the max.

Deus Ex Mankind Divided: 600p Minimum QualityDeus Ex Mankind Divided: 1080p Maximum Quality

At the minimum settings, all of the integrated graphics are easily playable, with AMD winning at 15 W but the 28 W Tiger Lake goes a bit above that, within reaching distance of the desktop APU. At a more regular 1080p Maximum, the 20 FPS is perhaps a bit too slow for regular gameplay.

Xe-LP GPU Performance: Civilization VI Xe-LP GPU Performance: Final Fantasy XIV
POST A COMMENT

252 Comments

View All Comments

  • huangcjz - Friday, September 18, 2020 - link

    Jim Salter, the author at Ars, replied in the comments on their article that the reason why they disclosed that it was MSI was because they specifically asked Intel to check with MSI whether they could disclose that it was made by them (because MSI might not want this to be compared to their finished products when this is a prototype), whereas other reviewers didn't explicitly ask Intel if they could do so:

    "I wonder why Anandtech felt the need to conceal the system manufacturer's name."

    "They were being respectful, since prototype recipients were asked not to take pictures of innards, not do battery tests, and a few other things due to this very much not being a production laptop.

    I would have done the same, except that I specifically asked my Intel rep whether MSI would prefer to be named or not. My rep took a day to find answers, then came back and said that naming MSI was fine as long as we made it clear that this wasn't a retail system."
    Reply
  • Spunjji - Saturday, September 19, 2020 - link

    Nice! Thanks for the context. Reply
  • Oxford Guy - Sunday, September 20, 2020 - link

    The name of the manufacturer isn't the point. Reply
  • m53 - Friday, September 18, 2020 - link

    Intel don't want to provide free marketing to MSI which might make the other OEMs unhappy. That's why they can't say that it is an MSI system. Reply
  • huangcjz - Friday, September 18, 2020 - link

    Jim Salter, the author at Ars, replied in the comments on their article that the reason why they disclosed that it was MSI was because they specifically asked Intel to check with MSI whether they could disclose that it was made by them (because MSI might not want this to be compared to their finished products when this is a prototype), whereas other reviewers didn't explicitly ask Intel if they could do so:

    "I wonder why Anandtech felt the need to conceal the system manufacturer's name."

    "They were being respectful, since prototype recipients were asked not to take pictures of innards, not do battery tests, and a few other things due to this very much not being a production laptop.

    I would have done the same, except that I specifically asked my Intel rep whether MSI would prefer to be named or not. My rep took a day to find answers, then came back and said that naming MSI was fine as long as we made it clear that this wasn't a retail system."
    Reply
  • Oxford Guy - Sunday, September 20, 2020 - link

    The name of the manufacturer isn't the point. Reply
  • wow&wow - Thursday, September 17, 2020 - link

    Two chips in a package, so it isn't a monolithic chip even with 10nm? Reply
  • RedOnlyFan - Friday, September 18, 2020 - link

    That's soc and the pch dies. The compute is still monolithic. Reply
  • Spunjji - Friday, September 18, 2020 - link

    But AMD have the PCH on-die... 😬 Reply
  • RedOnlyFan - Friday, September 18, 2020 - link

    Intel needed a kick where it hurts, now it's safe to put the stick back in the storeroom? Reply

Log in

Don't have an account? Sign up now