Aside from Comet Lake vPro being announced today, Intel is also lifting the lid on a new series of processors: W-1200. This line of parts are analogous to Intel’s 10th Gen Comet Lake consumer hardware, but with support for dual channel ECC DDR4-2933 memory, up to 128 GB. These new parts will not work in the Z490 motherboards just released onto the market, they will require new W480 motherboards – we know that most of the motherboard vendors are planning to support the platform. These CPUs are also part of the vPro line when paired with W480, supporting Intel Hardware Shield, but otherwise have similar specifications to the consumer parts.

Intel 10th Gen Comet Lake vPro
Workstation
AnandTech Cores Base
Freq
TB2
1C
TB2
nT
TB3
1C
TVB
1C
TVB
nT
TDP
(W)
IGP Price
W-1290P 10C/20T 3.7 ? 4.8 5.2 5.3 4.9 125 P630 $539
W-1290 10C/20T 3.2 ? 4.6 5.1 5.2 4.7 80 P630 $494
W-1290T 10C/20T 1.9 ? 3.8 4.7 - - 35 P630 $494
W-1270P 8C/16T 3.8 ? 4.7 5.1 - - 125 P630 $428
W-1270 8C/16T 3.4 ? 4.7 5.0 - - 80 P630 $362
W-1250P 6C/12T 4.1 ? 4.5 - - - 125 P630 $311
W-1250 6C/12T 3.3 ? 4.4 - - - 80 P630 $255

The top of the line W-1290P offers the same specifications as the Core i9-10900K, albeit without overclocking. Each of the W-1200 series have integrated GPUs. Some of the models are labelled ‘P’, which in this case means ‘Performance’ – these are the 125 W TDP processors.

Intel didn’t provide any detail about the W480 motherboards, or which partners will have them. None of the motherboard manufacturers reached out to announce their W480 products, and thus we expect there to be more disclosure about this later in the month.

One big question that arose about these new Xeon W-1200 processors is what happens to the Xeon E series. Traditionally this space, for ‘enterprise’ CPUs that mimic the consumer platform, is the target of the Xeon E processors. Intel launched E-2200, based on Intel Core 9th Gen, in the second half of last year, but we have learned through emails that Xeon E is now morphing into Xeon W. It is unclear if the Xeon E brand will continue.

Intel didn’t provide pricing for the Xeon W-1200 series, nor any indication of which models will be sold at retail, nor when they will be available, or by what partners. Any partner that provided E-2200 systems are likely to provide W-1200 variants.

Edit 4:20pm ET: Prices from ark.intel.com added.

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  • cbm80 - Thursday, May 14, 2020 - link

    I think the plan is to just keep selling "9th Gen" products until "11th Gen" comes, i.e. skip 10th Gen. Reply
  • vFunct - Wednesday, May 13, 2020 - link

    No Optane DCPMM support in this line? Could be a great option for development testing for servers. Reply
  • MrEcho - Thursday, May 14, 2020 - link

    I wonder if these would work in the MacPro? Reply
  • duploxxx - Thursday, May 14, 2020 - link

    so in this generation you get a 10c Xeon W for the price of an 8 Core Xeon E... where is the time that Intel would ask double the price for 2 cores more..... the rip-off finale got ended. thx AMD Reply
  • BambiBoom - Friday, May 15, 2020 - link

    Dr. Ian Cutress,

    An unfortunate platform syllogism:

    If Xeon E3-1200 = LGA1151

    and LGA1151 = LGA1200

    Then Xeon W-1200 = Xeon E3-1200

    That there is apparently no longer a "little" Xeon and "big" Xeon. With Xeon W-1200, the fundamental consequential loss of PCIe lanes, quad memory, cache, and need to buy a new motherboard is Intel's obvious concession to AMD; apparently the only way Intel can lower the price to be competitive. However, potential buyers of Xeon W-1200 will more than notice and we're warned that in a year comes LGA1700, so everything can be thrown away again. The higher clock speeds of E-12XX are welcome, but of course, there is a substantial power and cooling requirement increase.

    I would very much like to see Intel get back in the game. Intel should devise a new LGA2066, rebrand the ridiculously expensive, low clock Xeon Scalable as server only. Then,create a new "big" workstation Xeon, e.g. X-31XX, lots of cache, a couple of cores above 5GHz, in 6,8,10,12,16,24,and 32-core configurations, quad channel memory up to 512GB, and piles and piles of PCIe lanes, so there is full x16 performance on up to four GPU's. The Scalables will continue for server use, but the poor clock speeds and extreme cost (appropriately, series names include: Gold, Silver, and Platinum) may welll sink them eventually against EPYC.

    Meanwhile, until July, 17, 2020, seeing whatever the Ryzen 3000 16-core is, I'm going to hobble along on a 2013, 4.3Ghz, 8-core Xeon E5, and then, for now, get off the Intel sinking ship.

    But, don't worry, in three or four, or five years or so, Intel will be back- with 10nm stuff you won't believe is happening!
    Reply
  • ballsystemlord - Friday, May 15, 2020 - link

    @Ian I read the title and thought the 480W was the TDP! Really! :D Reply
  • spencer145 - Thursday, May 21, 2020 - link

    As for the performance, it is a devastating experience to live under the pressure when you are expected to reach perfection. Tell the kid that everyone makes mistakes, and it is a normal part of learning. Also, most of the children may need help doing homework. <a href="https://essayswriting.org/">Essay writing service</a> have been created to help with it Reply
  • spencer145 - Thursday, May 21, 2020 - link

    As for the performance, it is a devastating experience to live under the pressure when you are expected to reach perfection. Tell the kid that everyone makes mistakes, and it is a normal part of learning. Also, most of the children may need help doing homework. https://essayswriting.org/ have been created to help with it Reply

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