Gaming: Strange Brigade (DX12, Vulkan)

Strange Brigade is based in 1903’s Egypt and follows a story which is very similar to that of the Mummy film franchise. This particular third-person shooter is developed by Rebellion Developments which is more widely known for games such as the Sniper Elite and Alien vs Predator series. The game follows the hunt for Seteki the Witch Queen who has arose once again and the only ‘troop’ who can ultimately stop her. Gameplay is cooperative centric with a wide variety of different levels and many puzzles which need solving by the British colonial Secret Service agents sent to put an end to her reign of barbaric and brutality.

The game supports both the DirectX 12 and Vulkan APIs and houses its own built-in benchmark which offers various options up for customization including textures, anti-aliasing, reflections, draw distance and even allows users to enable or disable motion blur, ambient occlusion and tessellation among others. AMD has boasted previously that Strange Brigade is part of its Vulkan API implementation offering scalability for AMD multi-graphics card configurations.

AnandTech IGP Low
Average FPS
95th Percentile

All of our benchmark results can also be found in our benchmark engine, Bench.

AnandTech IGP Low
Average FPS
95th Percentile
Gaming: Ashes Classic (DX12) Gaming: Grand Theft Auto V
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  • Ryan Smith - Tuesday, May 26, 2020 - link

    To be sure, it's GTX 1080. IGP is the name of the setting. Reply
  • F123Nova - Saturday, May 23, 2020 - link

    I am trying my best to be nice, but this article has the most dubious set of benchmarks I have seen, and the omission in the charts of Intel competition in certain charts where the competition is better makes me wonder why this article smells of a cash handout. Cant say for sure if this is another "Just buy it" piece, but it sure smells foul. I expected more from Anandtech... Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Tuesday, May 26, 2020 - link

    Hi Nova,

    As has been the case for the past 23 years, we always strive to have accurate reporting, to the best of our abilities.

    Given that we're in the process of rolling out some new benchmarks (such as the Crysis software render), we haven't yet had a chance to backfill in results for a number of processors. Unfortunately that's going to take some time. But in the meantime, was there any specific benchmark(s) you were concerned about? That might at least help us better prioritize what to backfill first.

    And to be sure, there's no cash handout. That's not how we operate. (Selling out for anything less than an incredibly comfortable retirement isn't very helpful for our future employment prospects)
    Reply
  • tvdang7 - Wednesday, May 27, 2020 - link

    why couldnt AT use a 3800x instead of a 3700x. Reply
  • pcgpus - Friday, July 10, 2020 - link

    Nice review. 10600K might be a new king in games (for fair price).

    If you want to compare this article with other services You have to go on this link:
    https://warmbit.blogspot.com/2020/06/intel-core-10...

    There are results from 9 services from 32 games!

    After page load please pick up your language from google translate (right side of page).
    Reply
  • pcgpus - Friday, July 10, 2020 - link

    Nice review. 10900K is the new king in games!

    If you want to compare this article with other services You have to go on this link:
    https://warmbit.blogspot.com/2020/06/intel-core-i9...

    There are results from 9 services from 35 games!

    After page load please pick up your language from google translate (right side of page).
    Reply
  • Meteor2 - Wednesday, July 15, 2020 - link

    A new microarchitecture doesn’t require a new process. When PAO immediately went south, I don’t understand why Intel didn’t just implement a new microarchitecture on 14 nm. Surely Ice Lake hasn’t taken four years to develop? Reply
  • Meteor2 - Wednesday, July 15, 2020 - link

    *Sunny Cove. God Intel’s code-names are dumb Reply
  • miss5tability - Saturday, August 8, 2020 - link

    i just discovered this INTEL SCAM, now i dont freaking understand how those 10 gen cpu works i wanna buy i3 10300 and what im reading this is not 65W chip? what is real f@#%$@ power draw for those cpus Reply
  • damian101 - Monday, August 10, 2020 - link

    As far as I know Intel never used a single bidirectional ring bus on CPUs with more than 10 cores.
    On Intel Ivy Bridge CPUs with 12 and more (15) cores, Intel used three unidirectional ring buses. There were also no Sandy Bridge CPUs with more than 10 cores, and Intel used two bidirectional ring buses connected with buffered switches for their high core count Haswell CPUs.
    Reply

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