ASUS Prime Z490-P

The ASUS Prime Z490-P is a modest offering for users on LGA1200, with a more basic set of features for those on a budget. It does include a Thunderbolt 3 front panel header for users looking to add Thunderbolt 3 via an add-on card and has support for DDR-4600 memory. Also featured are two PCIe 3.0 x4 M.2 slots, a Realtek Gigabit Ethernet controller, and a Realtek ALC887 HD audio codec.

Following an elemental silver and black theme throughout, the ASUS Prime Z490-P has two full-length PCIe 3.0 slots which run at x16/+4, and has three additional PCIe 3.0 x1 slots. Although this model doesn't come with a wireless interface by default, it has a single Key-E M.2 slot so users can install their own. For storage is a pair of PCIe 3.0 x4 M.2 slots, while the board makes use of four straight-angled SATA ports located at the bottom of the board. Following a trend across all of the Z490 offerings, the Prime Z490-P has support for DDR4-4600, across four slots with up to a maximum of 128 GB memory. It uses a simple 10+1 power delivery, which like other ASUS Z490 models, is using teamed power stages.

Even though it's fundamental in design, the rear panel has plenty for users to utilize. Included are two USB 3.2 G2 Type-A, two USB 3.2 G1 Type-A, and two USB 2.0 ports. It has a pair of video outputs consisting of an HDMI 1.4b, and DisplayPort 1.4, while a Realtek ALC887 HD audio codec powers the five 3.5 mm audio jacks and S/PDIF optical output. The single Ethernet port is powered by a Realtek RTL8111H Gigabit controller, while at the left-hand side of the rear panel is a single PS/2 combo port. 

The ASUS Prime Z490-P has an MSRP of $160 and represents one of ASUS's entry-level Z490 models. It focuses more on essential controllers with a budget flavour including a Realtek Ethernet and audio controller pairing, with less flash and more substance. The Prime Z490-P is the decent choice for users on a budget looking to use Intel's 10th generation Comet Lake desktop processors, but without the need to spend an exuberant amount of money.

ASUS Prime Z490-A ASUS Prime Z490M-Plus
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  • stevenfindley - Monday, June 8, 2020 - link

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  • Shinkiro - Friday, May 1, 2020 - link

    A lot of people don't upgrade every consecutive generation. My 3570k and 980ti have been serving me well for half a decade, but now that it's time to get new gear I'm happy to see higher maximum speeds and lower temperatures than the previous generation. The fact that gen10 requires a different socket than Gen 9 is completely irrelevant to me, aside from choosing a compatible board. Reply
  • Orange_Swan - Friday, May 1, 2020 - link

    Exactly, my i5-4690k has served me well for just under 6 years (brought Nov. 14), I tend to buy a new CPU and Mobo every 5ish years. Reply
  • althaz - Saturday, May 2, 2020 - link

    The point is though, that you need to buy a new motherboard, which means you'll probably consider AMD's Ryzen 3000 line-up (generally, AMD will give you better productivity performance, upgradability and lower power, but worse gaming performance, which is why I went Intel last year). If Intel weren't such dicks in forcing people to buy new motherboards, maybe you would be able to just drop in a new CPU (actually in your case it really is irrelevant, a new motherboard was *actually* needed for 6th gen, everything since then would work on the same boards if Intel weren't dicks, but the point stands in general). Reply
  • Tabalan - Sunday, May 3, 2020 - link

    Intel i5 3570k was released 8 years ago, while i5 4690k is 6 years old. Wanting to upgrade build after 6 years with 3 years of mobo backward compatibility (like with AMD, Ryzen 1000 to 4000) means that you either buy 3 years old CPU or buy new mobo + new CPU. In latter case, it doesn't matter if you go with Intel or AMD, because it's down to same thing. Reply
  • bronan - Saturday, May 16, 2020 - link

    Indeed my point exactly every year new stuff gets launched and loads of people jump onto the newest toys just because the cpu is maybe 0.1 Ghz faster if your lucky.
    Because that boost does not work constant at all, i saw that with several friends who bought the 8700k which claims to boost to 4.7 Ghz. Reality is that only 3 out of 28 of these cpu did boost up to 4.7 the rest only gets between 4.4 and 4.6 at the highest and to be honest only in certain tasks.
    So if you follow the baseline of the cpu usage you see during some tasks a few spikes but most of the time it hangs around the baseclock speed.
    I actually still was using my 6700k till 2 months ago on a z170 motherboard then i saw somebody selling his 8700k for a nice price and i switch over.
    The performance increase is close to 0 in almost every task besides when i am packing and unpacking rar and zip files. In the games i do i see hardly any performance gains as well.
    The only thing i am planning to update now is my graphics card, so i am kinda waiting for a very cheap AMD VII or if AMD releases the new big navy.
    But the people who own the AMD VII tend to want to keep them because there had not been one for sale in many months for a reasonable price. The only one i saw was sold at a price above the release price when they came to market.....
    So those who bought the cards seem to be content enough to not sell them at all.
    So i am still stuck at my gtx 1070 and have no plans to pay a premium price for a next gen GPU.
    @Orange_Swan i tend to buy only when i see a huge improvement for the tasks i do, if its below 3% increase i will not buy anything at all. So i sometimes keep running the same stuff sometimes even up to 12 years.
    I got a huge amount of people who i help with their pc hardware and problems and almost everyone of them relies on my expertise to give them proper advise when they want some kinda upgrade.
    Often i can asure them that even though the bragging bonus can be fun, they often will see no improvement at all if they buy a new system. So they wait till i tell them their system can be upgraded or replaced. In almost any case its the gpu which gets replaced by a second hand one in very rare situations i have to ask them to order a new one.
    What i am saying is that even though they keep releasing new stuff, most people do not have a need to upgrade/update anything.
    Actually for now there is absolute no need to have something faster at all for any game at all in the near future, because all will run fine with your current stuff.
    I actually have several who have at least a titan from recent generation and still can not run their games at highest settings in 4K.
    Reply
  • RealBeast - Friday, May 1, 2020 - link

    All of my builds since my Athlon have been Intel, but no way they'll suck me in on this Z490 1200 pin build, when their next decent CPUs will require something like a Z491 with 1201 pins. ;) Reply
  • Andrew LB - Saturday, May 9, 2020 - link

    Intel has already said the next gen will still use LGA 1200 socket. Reply
  • WaltC - Friday, May 1, 2020 - link

    Can't see much "exciting" about this...;) Reply
  • Oxford Guy - Tuesday, May 5, 2020 - link

    It seems like a poster child for a Powerpoint on the inefficiencies of capitalism.

    Literally making another iteration of products "just because".
    Reply

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