Compute

Along with our usual gaming results, we’ll also take a cursory look at compute performance for the GTX 1650 Super. This is one area where NVIDIA has developed an unusual advantage, at least for the moment, as AMD’s OpenCL driver for the Radeon RX 5000 series cards is currently broken and unfit for production use. I don’t expect anyone to be using a GTX 1650 Super for any serious compute work – generally if you need GPU compute, you’re after higher-end GPUs to really push performance – but if you do find yourself buying a $160 card for compute purposes, among modern cards NVIDIA is currently the only game in town for both OpenCL and CUDA.

Compute: LuxMark 3.1 - Hotel

Compute: CompuBench 2.0 - Level Set Segmentation 256

Compute: CompuBench 2.0 - N-Body Simulation 1024K

Compute: CompuBench 2.0 - Optical Flow

Compute: V-Ray Next Benchmark (CUDA)

Compute: Folding @ Home Single Precision

The Division 2, Grant Theft Auto V, & Forza Horizon 4 Synthetics
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  • Korguz - Sunday, December 22, 2019 - link

    why do you think the games will target ps4 ?? is this just your own opinion?? Reply
  • Kangal - Sunday, December 22, 2019 - link

    Because there's a lot of PS4 units hooked up to TVs right now, there will still be hooked up until 2022. When the PS4 launched, the PS3 was slightly ahead of the Xbox 360, yet sales were nothing like the PS4's. And the PS3 was very outdated back in 2014, whereas in 2020, the PS4 is not nearly as outdated... so there's more longevity in there.

    So with all those factors and history, there's a high probability (certainty?) that Game Publishers will still target the PS4 as their baseline. This is good news for Gaming PC's with only 8GB RAM and 4GB VRAM, and performance below that of a RX 5700. Regardless, it's always easier to upgrade a PC's GPU than it is to upgrade the entire console.

    ...that's why Ryan is not quite right
    Reply
  • Korguz - Sunday, December 22, 2019 - link

    um yea ok sure... and you have numbers to confirm this ?? seems plausible, but also, just personal opinion Reply
  • Kangal - Monday, December 23, 2019 - link

    During the launch of the PS4 back in 2014, the older PS3 was 8 YEARS OLD at the time, and hadn't aged well, but it did a commendable sales of 85 Million consoles.

    I was surprised by the Xbox 360 which was 9.5 YEARS OLD, which understandably was more outdated, and it did a surprising sales of 75 Million consoles.

    Because both consoles weren't very modern/quite outdated, and marketing was strong, the initial sales of the PS4 and Xbox One were very strong in 2014. Despite this there was about another, 5 Million PS3 and Xbox 360, budget sales made in this period. And it took until Early-2016 for Game Publishers to ditch the PS3 and Xbox 360. So about 1.5 Years, and about 40 Million sales (PS4) or 25 Million sales (Xbox 360) later. During this period people using 2GB VRAM Graphic Cards (GTX 960, AMD R9 370X) were in the clear. Only after 2016 were they really outdated, but it was a simple GPU Swap for most people.

    So that's what happened, that's our history.
    Now let's examine the current/upcoming events!
    The PS4 has sold a whopping 105 Million consoles, and the Xbox One has a commendable 50 Million units sold. These consoles should probably reach 110 Million and 55 Million respectively when the PS5 and Xbox X release. And within 2 years they will probably settle on a total of 120 Million and 60 Million sales total. That's a huge player base for companies to ignore, and is actually better than the previous generation. However, this current gen will have both consoles much less outdated than the previous gen, and it's understandable since both consoles will only be 6 YEARS OLD. So by the end of 2022, it should (will !!) be viable to use a lower-end card, something that "only" has 4GB VRAM such as the RX 5500XT or the GTX 1650-Super. And after that, it's a simple GPU Swap to fix that problem anyway so it's no big deal.

    Ryan thinks these 4GB VRAM cards will be obsolete within 6 Months. He's wrong about the timing. It should take 2 Years, or about x4 as much time. If he or you disagree, that's fine, but I'm going off past behavior and other factors. I will see Ryan in 6 Months and see if he was right or wrong.... if I remember to revisit this article/comment that is : )
    Reply
  • Korguz - Monday, December 23, 2019 - link

    and yet... i know some friends that sold their playstations.. and got xboxes... go figure....
    for game makers to make a game for a console to port it to a comp = a crappy game for the most part.. supreme commander 2, is a prime example of this....
    Reply
  • flyingpants265 - Sunday, December 22, 2019 - link

    Most benchmarks on this site are pretty bad and missing a lot of cards.

    Bench is OK but the recent charts are missing a lot of cards and a lot of tests.

    Pcpartpicker is working on a better version of bench, they've got dozens of PCs running benchmarks, 24/7 year-round, to test every possible combination of hardware and create a comprehensive benchmark list. Kind of an obvious solution, and I'm surprised nobody has bothered to do this for... 20-30 years or longer..
    Reply
  • Korguz - Sunday, December 22, 2019 - link

    hmmmmmm could it be because of, oh, let me guess... cost ????????????????? Reply
  • sheh - Saturday, December 21, 2019 - link

    In the buffer compression tests the 1650S fares worse than both the non-S cards and the 1050 Ti.
    How come?

    Curiously, the 1660S is even worse than the 1650S.
    Reply
  • catavalon21 - Saturday, December 21, 2019 - link

    Guessing it's ratio differences not rated to absolute performance. A more comprehensive chart in BENCH of the INT8 Buffer Compression test shows the 2080Ti with a far lower score than any of the recent mid-range offerings.

    https://www.anandtech.com/bench/GPU19/2690
    Reply
  • catavalon21 - Sunday, December 22, 2019 - link

    * not related to Reply

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